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Midnight Sun

Our sun is absolutely astounding, and that’s no news, especially for JOL readers. However, the grand winner of a National Geographic exploration trip through X Prize, Joe Capra, entered with a stunning video about our home star’s polar seasonal effects so delightfully, I had to share.

In areas north of the arctic circle or south of the antarctic circle, in summer months the sun can be visible for up to twenty-four hours of the day, sinking but never dropping below the horizon line. This is similar to the effect of “white nights” where latitudes as low as sixty degrees experience midnight twilight, though in white nights the sun does go below the horizon line. In his film’s narration, Mr. Capra speaks about how because of the midnight sun effect, he had almost six hours between sunset and sunrise of low-level light to shoot.

Check out Mr. Capra’s video, “Land of the Midnight Sun” (RSS readers, please click through!):

A beautiful video on the opposite effect, polar night, Jim shared here.

6:30 am Never Looked So Good

Taking the same exact photograph each day would get boring, right? HELL NO, thanks to that most spectacular lighting designer–nature. Robert Weingarten did just that, and the results are something to marvel at. It is SO important to appreciate the root of all lighting design, our sun, and these photographs prove that that star’s still got it!

Each exposure would be made at precisely the same time of day – 6:30 am – measured by one quartz clock. All exposures would be made with the lens focused on infinity and at the same aperture of f/22. Just two variables were allowed into this disciplined scheme: the shutter speed of the lens, which would be adjusted faster or slower depending on the quantity and quality of light available at 6:30 a.m. each day; and, the most variable element of all, changes in the scene that were introduced by the forces of nature.

– Weston Naef, Curator of Photographs, The J. Paul Getty Museum.

6:30 am from Malibu, CA looking across the Pacific Ocean to Santa Monica: