JOL Sunday Flickr #31

As many times as I write this post, I always see something new in the material.  I love sharing these works with the world.  Do you ever check out the JimOnLight Flickr Group?

SVO Always Near

Sortidor d'aigüa

Sometimes nature needs no filter. #nofilter

Shooting Star

Lake Alexandrina Sunrise

Untitled

Dead Sea & Holy Light

Light up the dark!

Light and shadow

Light and Shadow

chamsys

The Mudhouse

Sunrise at Taylors Mistake

---Go.es B.efore O.ptics---

---swefog - live t26 evo2---

light

light trails

Lollapalooza 2011

the beauty in layers

I hope one of these motivates you somehow creatively.  Have an amazing remainder of your Sunday.

Shuttle Challenger Exploded Thirty Years Ago Today

Today is the 30th anniversary of the failed STS-51-L mission of the Challenger.  It was her tenth mission.  All seven crew members were killed in the failure — this wasn’t quite our finest hour, as America and the world discovered during the Rogers Commission report, a huge part in thanks to the hard-ass stylings of Dr. Richard Feynman.

Commander Francis R. Scobee – Second spaceflight
Pilot Michael J. Smith – First spaceflight
Mission Specialist 1 Ellison S. Onizuka – Second spaceflight
Mission Specialist 2 Judith A. Resnik – Second spaceflight
Mission Specialist 3 Ronald E. McNair – Second spaceflight
Payload Specialist 1 Gregory B. Jarvis – First spaceflight
Payload Specialist 2 S. Christa McAuliffe – First spaceflight

Video of the incident — many of us reading this probably sat at a grade school library table and watched this happen.  I remember I sure did.  Mrs. Wilton was so upset, I will never forget that for some reason.

 

what-happened-to-challenger

Here’s some pretty interesting video, this is NASA mission video of the Challenger launch and failure:

Some interesting facts that many people never knew about this mission:

  • Challenger lasted 73 seconds off the pad that day.
  • Four of the astronauts enabled their own secondary oxygen packs, which can only be done manually.  This was discovered after the capsule was recovered; that means that they were not killed by the explosion.  It is likely they were alive, but decidedly unconscious when they hit the water.  If the explosion had not caused their deaths, NASA believes that the water impact would have.
  • As part of the Rogers Commission, famed scientist and mathematical bad ass (and 1965 Nobel Prize winner in Theoretical Physics) Richard Feynman deduced that there was a failure of the rubber o-rings sealing the rocket booster motors; on the day that the Challenger exploded, aerospace/military/chemical engineering contractor Morton Thiokol had only certified the o-rings for 53 degrees Fahrenheit, and the launch was predicted to have the o-ring ambient temperature at 29 degrees Fahrenheit.  The rubber o-ring seal on the solid rocket boosters literally were pinched and cold and didn’t bounce back like a normal piece of malleable rubber would.  This was the overall cause of the failure.  Dr. Feynman actually demonstrated this on television live in a glass of ice water and a c-clamp, funny enough.  The scientific pwnage that took place during that press conference was actually pretty fantastic, because the NASA managers involved had been playing and hiding things during the investigation:
  • The o-ring failure actually killed the Challenger crew twice in a way, as there was evidence between 0.678 seconds and 2.30 seconds on the mission clock that the o-rings had a few points of failure noticed in the re-observation of the video during investigation.  Instantly though, these holes were sealed back up with aluminum oxides as the fuel burned — these oxides are of a very glassy, fragile nature, and in an almost fate-sealed string of events, the worst wind-shear NASA had ever experienced on a mission also happened that morning, slapping the SRBs around so hard that the oxides plugging those holes just became no more, allowing 5,000-degree gasses to escape at the seal point, melting the strut into the fuel tank, and destroying the vehicle.
    SRB-o-rings
  • You know how big that gap was in the rubber o-ring seal that caused the failure?  0.004four one thousandths of an inch.  Essentially what happened was that the seal location was not a round shape, and since the air was so cold the night before and day of the launch that the rubber seals compressed and stayed that shape.  NASA was counting on the seals to be springy, malleable, able to withstand the pressure.

If you’ve never read any of the Rogers Commission Report on the Challenger disaster and you are so inclined, I highly recommend it — the researcher/science nerd part of me totally digs on that stuff.  Here, for example, is the Condition’s Cause Findings from the Commission, published here, at NASA — this particular page is Chapter 4Chapter 5 is even more scathing, rightfully so.

Chapter 4 – THE CAUSE OF THE ACCIDENT

The consensus of the Commission and participating investigative agencies is that the loss of the Space Shuttle Challenger was caused by a failure in the joint between the two lower segments of the right Solid Rocket Motor. The specific failure was the destruction of the seals that are intended to prevent hot gases from leaking through the joint during the propellant burn of the rocket motor. The evidence assembled by the Commission indicates that no other element of the Space Shuttle system contributed to this failure.

In arriving at this conclusion, the Commission reviewed in detail all available data, reports and records; directed and supervised numerous tests, analyses, and experiments by NASA, civilian contractors and various government agencies; and then developed specific scenarios and the range of most probable causative factors.

FINDINGS

1. A combustion gas leak through the right Solid Rocket Motor aft field joint initiated at or shortly after ignition eventually weakened and/or penetrated the External Tank initiating vehicle structural breakup and loss of the Space Shuttle Challenger during STS Mission 51-L.

2. The evidence shows that no other STS 51-L Shuttle element or the payload contributed to the causes of the right Solid Rocket Motor aft field joint combustion gas leak. Sabotage was not a factor.

3. Evidence examined in the review of Space Shuttle material, manufacturing, assembly, quality control, and processing on non-conformance reports found no flight hardware shipped to the launch
site that fell outside the limits of Shuttle design specifications.

4. Launch site activities, including assembly and preparation, from receipt of the flight hardware to launch were generally in accord with established procedures and were not considered a factor in the accident.

5. Launch site records show that the right Solid Rocket Motor segments were assembled using approved procedures. However, significant out-of-round conditions existed between the two segments joined at the right Solid Rocket Motor aft field joint (the joint that failed).

a. While the assembly conditions had the potential of generating debris or damage that could cause O-ring seal failure, these were not considered factors in this accident.
b. The diameters of the two Solid Rocket Motor segments had grown as a result of prior use.
c. The growth resulted in a condition at time of launch wherein the maximum gap between the tang and clevis in the region of the joint’s O-rings was no more than .008 inches and the average
gap would have been .004 inches.
d. With a tang-to-clevis gap of .004 inches, the O-ring in the joint would be compressed to the extent that it pressed against all three walls of the O-ring retaining channel.
e. The lack of roundness of the segments was such that the smallest tang-to-clevis clearance occurred at the initiation of the assembly operation at positions of 120 degrees and 300 degrees around the circumference of the aft field joint. It is uncertain if this tight condition and the resultant greater compression of the O-rings at these points persisted to the time of launch.

6. The ambient temperature at time of launch was 36 degrees Fahrenheit, or 15 degrees lower than the next coldest previous launch.

a. The temperature at the 300 degree position on the right aft field joint circumference was estimated to be 28 degrees plus or minus 5 degrees Fahrenheit. This was the coldest point on the joint.
b. Temperature on the opposite side of the right Solid Rocket Booster facing the sun was estimated to be about 50 degrees Fahrenheit.

7. Other joints on the left and right Solid Rocket Boosters experienced similar combinations of tang-to-clevis gap clearance and temperature. It is not known whether these joints experienced distress during the flight of 51-L.

8. Experimental evidence indicates that due to several effects associated with the Solid Rocket Booster’s ignition and combustion pressures and associated vehicle motions, the gap between the tang and the clevis will open as much as .017 and .029 inches at the secondary and primary O-rings, respectively.

a. This opening begins upon ignition, reaches its maximum rate of opening at about 200-300 milliseconds, and is essentially complete at 600 milliseconds when the Solid Rocket Booster reaches its
operating pressure.
b. The External Tank and right Solid Rocket Booster are connected by several struts, including one at 310 degrees near the aft field joint that failed. This strut’s effect on the joint dynamics is to enhance the opening of the gap between the tang and clevis by about 10-20 percent in the region of 300-320 degrees.

9. O-ring resiliency is directly related to its temperature.

a. A warm O-ring that has been compressed will return to its original shape much quicker than will a cold O-ring when compression is relieved. Thus, a warm O-ring will follow the opening of the
tang-to-clevis gap. A cold O-ring may not.
b. A compressed O-ring at 75 degrees Fahrenheit is five times more responsive in returning to its uncompressed shape than a cold O-ring at 30 degrees Fahrenheit.
c. As a result it is probable that the O-rings in the right solid booster aft field joint were not following the opening of the gap between the tang and cleavis at time of ignition.

10. Experiments indicate that the primary mechanism that actuates O-ring sealing is the application of gas pressure to the upstream (high-pressure) side of the O-ring as it sits in its groove or
channel.

a. For this pressure actuation to work most effectively, a space between the O-ring and its upstream channel wall should exist during pressurization.
b. A tang-to-clevis gap of .004 inches, as probably existed in the failed joint, would have initially compressed the O-ring to the degreethat no clearance existed between the O-ring and its upstream channel wall and the other two surfaces of the channel.
c. At the cold launch temperature experienced, the O-ring would be very slow in returning to its normal rounded shape. It would not follow the opening of the tang-to-clevis gap. It would remain in its compressed position in the O-ring channel and not provide a space between itself and the upstream channel wall. Thus, it is probable the O-ring would not be pressure actuated to seal the gap in time to preclude joint failure due to blow-by and erosion from hot combustion gases.

11. The sealing characteristics of the Solid Rocket Booster O-rings are enhanced by timely application of motor pressure.

a. Ideally, motor pressure should be applied to actuate the O-ring and seal the joint prior to significant opening of the tang-to-clevis gap (100 to 200 milliseconds after motor ignition).
b. Experimental evidence indicates that temperature, humidity and other variables in the putty compound used to seal the joint can delay pressure application to the joint by 500 milliseconds or more.
c. This delay in pressure could be a factor in initial joint failure.

12. Of 21 launches with ambient temperatures of 61 degrees Fahrenheit or greater, only four showed signs of O-ring thermal distress; i.e., erosion or blow-by and soot. Each of the launches below 61 degrees Fahrenheit resulted in one or more O-rings showing signs of thermal distress.

a. Of these improper joint sealing actions, one-half occurred in the aft field joints, 20 percent in the center field joints, and 30 percent in the upper field joints. The division between left and right Solid Rocket Boosters was roughly equal.
b. Each instance of thermal O-ring distress was accompanied by a leak path in the insulating putty. The leak path connects the rocket’s combustion chamber with the O-ring region of the tang and clevis. Joints that actuated without incident may also have had these leak paths.

13. There is a possibility that there was water in the clevis of the STS 51-L joints since water was found in the STS-9 joints during a destack operation after exposure to less rainfall than STS 51-L. At
time of launch, it was cold enough that water present in the joint would freeze. Tests show that ice in the joint can inhibit proper secondary seal performance.

14. A series of puffs of smoke were observed emanating from the 51-L aft field joint area of the right Solid Rocket Booster between 0.678 and 2.500 seconds after ignition of the Shuttle Solid Rocket Motors.

a. The puffs appeared at a frequency of about three puffs per second. This roughly matches the natural structural frequency of the solids at lift off and is reflected in slight cyclic changes of the tang-to-clevis gap opening.
b. The puffs were seen to be moving upward along the surface of the booster above the aft field joint.
c. The smoke was estimated to originate at a circumferential position of between 270 degrees and 315 degrees on the booster aft field joint, emerging from the top of the joint.

15. This smoke from the aft field joint at Shuttle lift off was the first sign of the failure of the Solid Rocket Booster O-ring seals on STS 51-L.

16. The leak was again clearly evident as a flame at approximately 58 seconds into the flight. It is possible that the leak was continuous but unobservable or non-existent in portions of the intervening
period. It is possible in either case that thrust vectoring and normal vehicle response to wind shear as well as planned maneuvers reinitiated or magnified the leakage from a degraded seal in the
period preceding the observed flames. The estimated position of the flame, centered at a point 307 degrees around the circumference of the aft field joint, was confirmed by the recovery of two fragments of the right Solid Rocket Booster.

a. A small leak could have been present that may have grown to breach the joint in flame at a time on the order of 58 to 60 seconds after lift off.
b. Alternatively, the O-ring gap could have been resealed by deposition of a fragile buildup of aluminum oxide and other combustion debris. This resealed section of the joint could have been disturbed by thrust vectoring, Space Shuttle motion and flight loads inducted by changing winds aloft.
c. The winds aloft caused control actions in the time interval of 32 seconds to 62 seconds into the flight that were typical of the largest values experienced on previous missions.

CONCLUSION

In view of the findings, the Commission concluded that the cause of the Challenger accident was the failure of the pressure seal in the aft field joint of the right Solid Rocket Booster. The failure was
due to a faulty design unacceptably sensitive to a number of factors. These factors were the effects of temperature, physical dimensions, the character of materials, the effects of reusability, processing and the reaction of the joint to dynamic loading.

(Source: The Presidential Commission on the Space Shuttle Challenger Accident Report, June 6, 1986 p.40, p.70-81)

Rest in peace, you seven steely-eyed missile people.

Pre- and Post-Accident Designs for the Solid Rocket Booster Seals

Pre- and Post-Accident Designs for the Solid Rocket Booster Seals

Link thanks:

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/news/researchernews/rn_Colloquium1012.html
https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/Solid-Rocket-Motor-Cross-Section-with-O-Ring-Locations
http://www.spacesafetymagazine.com/space-disasters/challenger-disaster/
http://blog.cleveland.com/metro/2011/01/we_remember_the_challenger_shu.html

This link right here, a f*cking nerd’s wet dream:
http://datavirtualizer.com/critical-importance-of-data-visualization/

http://www.history.com/topics/challenger-disaster
http://www.engineering.com/Library/ArticlesPage/tabid/85/ArticleID/170/categoryId/7/The-Space-Shuttle-Challenger-Disaster.aspx

 

Andre Huff Breaks Boards with His Face, Offers $2500 Trade Ins on Classic Avo Desks Towards the Arena

Limelite-logo

avolites_arena

Ok, so this is only partly true, because I get to see Andre in a few days and I am going to hit him in the face with a 1X4 to see if he can truly withstand the poplar POWER!!!

What is truly important here is that Andre Huff of Limelight Design Services, an Avolites Dealer and Service Center kind of place that also designs badass rigs, etcetera etcetera, is offering anyone who will listen a $2500 trade in on your old classic Pearl towards the purchase of an Avolites Arena.  Nobody paid me jack shit to post this, I think it is bad ass.  Trade in your classic Avolites and get Arena and the power of Titan!

limelight_andre

So:  Andre is taking a $2500 trade in allowance off the price of a new Arena for these desks:

Pearl Classic
Pearl 2000
Pearl 2004
Pearl 2008
Pearl 2010
Sapphire 2000

 

 

 

That crazy bastard!  So, take advantage.  Call Limelight, call Andre, wake him up, tell him to make you eggs.

Are You Teaching Relevant Lighting?

Teaching is not just fundamental, it’s imperative to our industry.
If you get pissed off reading this, it’s meant for you.
What your anger means is that you’re guilty.
This can be fixed though, you CAN be an efficient modern lighting teaching instrument.  You just have to want it.


I spend a lot of time on the road, as is obvious from my Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter accounts.  When I am on the road talking to people, I often ask them a few questions, especially the younger guys and gals — I just met a super cool girl named Victoria that has no collegiate schooling at all; she was working Merchandise on the road before making her inrow as a lighting intern.  I asked her these questions:

  1. “Where did you go to school/Who did you study with?”
  2. “Was there anything that you found you learned better on the job?”
  3. “If you had the option, what would you rather have learned in the school setting?”

Now obviously she didn’t go to college, so a few of those didn’t qualify for her.  But one thing that is a constant throb in my f*cking head is the fact that a lot of teachers I speak to, especially the tenured ones, have pretty much the same tired ass fundamental excuse for why their kids don’t know about things that are very relevant in today’s working industry:

“But college is about teaching the fundamentals, not showing them about technology.”

BULL-F*CKING-SHIT.

I'm a water surfing elephant, bitch

Of COURSE teaching lighting fundamentals is important.  OF COURSE learning how to draft by hand is important, I teach it that way too.  In order for a student to know what the task is like on a computer means showing them how to do it when their computer is dead as shit.  To that effect, also important is operating a two-to-five scene preset desk so that they understand just what a blessing it is to have access to write a stack playlist somewhere, maybe trigger OTHER playlists from that single stack.  All modern console companies allow for this, it’s your responsibility to learn it well enough to teach it back to your kids.

College isn’t cheap.  At all.  For anyone.  Your old out-of-date lectures aren’t going to cut it anymore, and it makes your institution look lazy.

If you were on quarters for example and had ten weeks per class for four years, your excuse still blows, but at least you have a somewhat terrible excuse for your tenure review committee.  If you’re on semesters and have lighting students for four years, it’s time to start servicing the industry today.  USITT wants you to do it, I want you to do it, PLASA wants you to do it, LDI offers classes SO you can do it and the rest of the people in the industry who have to deal with your mediocre teaching methods want you to do it too.

Tenure Review Committees, pay attention.  You need to start judging your people harder.  Shouldn’t tenure mean more than “hell, I put up with this shit for four years and kissed enough asses?”  This industry is so chock full of technical equipment and necessary know-how that you need to start being a bit more hard on your lighting design professors and their success rate at placing kids in gigs in the real world industry.  Having a BA or BFA student leave your place without having at least SOME know-how on how to set up a lighting network, or how to operate something newer than your Express 250 or Strand 520i, is imperative.

Since so many people in this business get their panties in an uproar whenever their shit is mentioned, understand this — those two desks just referenced are absolutely awesome desks, and frankly I would play on one if they were still spec’d in the industry on the kinds of shows your students are going to find themselves in, especially if they journey outside of community theatre.  As a matter of fact, I’ve probably forgotten more about those two desks than a lot of you will be able to teach your students, and this is a problem.

I can't be bothered to learn more, I HAVE my degree!

Let’s take a look at some of the professor excuses I get to these comments:

  • “I have a lot of University meetings I am required to attend.”
  • “I just got into the Union!  That helps my students.”
  • “I’m preparing for my Tenure Committee review.”
  • “My students had rehearsal last night so I didn’t want to push them that hard.”
  • “Half of these students have NO future in our industry.”  [REALLY?!]
  • “These are [actors/dancers/singers] who have no interest in what I’m teaching.”  [WTMF?!!!]

Well, GUESS WHAT!  That’s all more bullshit that you can save your kids from by applying yourself.  I used to teach three courses of dancers in an intro lighting course.  What came out of my mouth frequently is that “this is relevant information for those times when you’re in between companies or auditions, so you can make rent.  And, this is WAY more fun than waiting tables.”

Was I a perfect teacher?  Most definitely not, I tried to maintain my career while I was teaching.  That causes a lot of jealousy and anger among non-supportive colleagues.  But I gave a shit about giving my students relevant, useful, and pertinent information they at least could use while they started their first gigs out there.  Perhaps my colleagues didn’t like me, but most of the students I taught are working, in their chosen field.  Suck on that.

schrodinger

“Oh but why aren’t you teaching anymore, Jim?  Can’t you handle it?”
Nope.  I got outta Shawshank.  In most places, the pay sucks – the administration either A) could give a shit about your little ‘Thee-Ate-‘Er plays’, B) has no money ever allocated to the furthering of your craft, or C) has no plans to allocate any more money than the couple of thousand a year Lighting gets for “lamps and gel.”  Besides, playing nice with people who feel like it’s their god-given right to be crusty and shitty is not my idea of a nurturing environment for professors.  I can’t even IMAGINE what the High School market is like.  I feel that I can frankly more effectively spread information across a wider group of people doing what I do right now than I ever could as a professor.  As a matter of fact, just recently an acquaintance of mine lost her job because the Tenured Boys Club at her specific institution didn’t think she fit in, regardless of the fact that she was a great prof and had more info for the students in the crack of her ass than most of them had combined.  It’s a crying shame that happens every day across the world.

Here’s a good place to start upping your game in the lighting classroom — if you can learn about these things, you will help your students all place in jobs and graduate schools once they leave your stead.  Do you understand how important this is?  Give your students the ability to actually speak and understand today’s lighting language.  Here’s eleven places to start, with another several thousand available:

  1. Artnet, Streaming ACN, and delivering DMX over something other than your stock 5-pin DMX cable, or even worse, your 3-pin MIC cable that is fed into some shitty 3-pin to 5-pin adaptor at your “tech booth.”  These things are what is running larger format shows anymore, and frankly, most shows in general.  Artnet is not quite as good as sACN, but you’ll learn why when you apply yourself.  I know money’s tight.  Rent something to expose the students to the same old DMX, but sent and received in a new way.  It really does blow minds.
  2. Get yourself in front of the budget committees, Dean, Provost, and anyone else who will listen about some kind of “rental budget.”  Maybe VL3500 spots are out of your price range to buy, but don’t you understand the importance of students just getting to take them out of the case and plug them in?  Patch them?  Learn why you TILT first and never PAN first?  Allow them to PLAY so that when they’re in the real world with people expecting them to deliver, they make good choices because you gave them the ability to play first.
  3. I understand you already have an ETC Express 24/48 or an Express 250, or maybe even something as lovely as a Leprechon LP-612.  Why not rent in a Hog 4, MA2 lite, Avolites Tiger Touch 2, or something larger format so that your students can understand why in the real world we use more than one playback for a reason?  While we’re on that subject, familiarize yourself with things like what TRACKING is and how to use it…  what a PART CUE is…  How to use Spreadsheet on an ETC desk you may have in your theatre… what split timings are…  inhibitive submasters and why they’re useful…installing profiles for multi-channel fixtures…  ALL of that stuff is included in your stack desk, it’s all basic programming.  All this costs you is time, and if you don’t have time for your students, you don’t deserve to be anywhere near them.  Sorry, that’s our industrial reality.
  4. Have you any idea how many free resources there are out there to get you at least somewhat more intelligent for your students than you are now?!  How about Control Booth, The Light Network, ESTA, Jim On Light, ProLightingSpace, and USITT just to name a few?  What the hell are you waiting for?
  5. Electrical — teach your kids how to read a meter.  Teach them about continuity checks, they’re not always gonna have a GamChek at their disposal.  Teach them how to meter power coming from a distro, SAFELY, and show them how it is to not get dead when doing something like that.  Ever handed a young stagehand a meter and watch them struggle to even plug their leads in?  Terrifying.  Teach them which holes NOT TO STICK THE PROBES IN, too.  Holy shit.
  6. Pay Richard Cadena to come to your school.  Take your happy ass over to the chair of your department and ask him or her to ask HIS or HER boss to find the small amount of money to do just that.  When he leaves, your students will know more about electricity than you’ve ever imagined.
  7. Start studying for the ETCP test, the NCQLP test, and anything that will help you have more learned information in your LD bag of tricks.  You don’t have to actually take or pass the tests if you’re not feeling confident, but just studying those exam prep guides will show you just what you DON’T know.
  8. Get your kids involved with USITT, ESTA, PLASA, and anything else that exposes them to people like me, like Richard Cadena, like Brad White, like Richard Belliveau, Berenice and Albert Chauvet, Ford Sellers, Matthias Hinricks, Rick Hutton, Eric Loader, and working LDs like Patrick Dierson, Sooner Routhier, Josh Schultz, BudRock, Benny Kirkham, Peter Morse, Anne McMills, Tharon Musser, Kevin Adams, Natasha Katz, Don Holder, Neil Austin, Jules Fisher and Peggy Eisenhower, Chris Ackerlind, and the other thousand and a half names that didn’t just pop in my head.  Get your kids around working people like Laura Frank, Sean Cagney, Loren Barton…  people who know what the f*ck they’re doing so that your students have positive role models.
  9. Have your students study modern lighting history.  Learning about 360Q’s and Strand Century 6X12’s is no longer applicable in today’s society of lighting, because they’re going to run into a Source Four ERS or Ovation LED ERS before they’re going to see a rental gig with 360Q’s on it.  Please do this.  It is so embarrassing for a student to ask how to run the barrel on a source four, for me, you, AND them…  because you bet your ass that information is going to get to someone you know that you don’t want to have know that your student had no clue.
  10. Do you know what RDM is?  Well, that’s a shame if you said no.  I’d learn it if you want students to be prepared.  OF COURSE they need to know what they are and where they came from, it’s our SM-58, essentially — they are used all over the world still.  But that’s also like saying that if you know how to use a hand saw, you’re good with a plasma cutter.
  11. Last but not least…  download some of the free MEDIA SERVER software available out there for use and abuse.  Teach your kids that we have these little computers that allow you to send console commands to them and play videos and images on video walls.  Can you believe that?!  If you’d have been keeping yourself relevant, you could.

One more thing:  getting “tenure” doesn’t excuse you from doing your job.  At all.  If anything, it SHOULD mean that you’re trustworthy of doing something GOOD and being better at it than the others in your faculty.  I yet to see a place like that.  Tenure in today’s society means that you have a harder time getting a tenured prof terminated.

Ok, I’m done here.  Pissed off?  Good.  Start making yourself a better teacher.  You’re sending out kids into a very complicated and dangerous world unprepared.  It’s time to put on those adult lighting undies and start kicking ass.  I’m counting on you, so are the rest of us.  Remember this:  we are all ineffective if we all don’t give a shit.  This may not be rocket surgery as Kirby Roberts always says, but to us, it’s our life and love and most favorite thing to do.

Now go get ’em, tiger.

 

CAST Software Wins Another Emmy for WYSIWYG

Emmy_logo

CAST Software, makers of WYSIWYG, Vivien Designer, and the becoming-popular BlackTrax software have been awarded a second Technical Emmy for their WYSIWYG work.

From the blog post at CAST Software’s blog:

CAST Software’s wysiwyg was selected as a winner in the Pre-Production Visualization System category of the 2015 Technical / Engineering Achievement Awards for the 67th Annual Technology & Engineering Emmy® Awards. This is the second Emmy® that wysiwyg has received to date.

Organized by The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (NATAS), these awards were judged by a committee of experts and will be presented during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) at The Bellagio Hotel in Las Vegas, NV on Friday, January 8th, 2016.

wysiwyg’s previsualization and lighting design software is currently in its 35th edition and continuing. It is used globally, not only by lighting designers, but also many key players in video and scenic design to pre-visualize to test and prove viability in the 3D environment before any real money is spent, making the process much more efficient.

A team of really clever people are behind this software and an intensive beta testing program ensures that the features of wysiwyg all work properly and are constantly updated. wysiwyg is also available in a student edition and for education institutions.

“This award is a testament to our innovation over the years, the continual development of wysiwyg and to the creative customers who use it in their projects. We are really proud to be honored with this recognition,” said Gil Densham, President at CAST Group.

Committee Chairman, Robert P. Seidel, Vice President of CBS Engineering and Advanced Technology and Chairman, Engineering Achievement Committee, NATAS adds: “The judges selected wysiwyg from CAST Software for its innovation and vision that has materially affected the way the audience views television and have set the standard for technological excellence in the industry.”

It sure was my pleasure to create the features for the versions I worked on in 2012 and 2013.  Hopefully those features helped.  I’m really super proud of everyone still at CAST that I worked with every day, those were some of the best times of my life with some of THE best people I’ve ever worked with.  I still use the software today for previz.

Congratulations to Gil, Dino, Peter, Igor, Eli (and the awesome software dev team), Carl and William the genius graphics ninjas, and all involved obviously, everyone deserved it.  We all worked super hard to make that software kick ass.  I’m super proud to see something I managed win an Emmy.

Have a good day, world of light.  I hope you get everything you want today.

 

RDM2GO – A Badass Handheld RDM & DMX Magic Box

Ok, this is pretty awesome.  Nobody paid me shit to post this, CHAUVET Professional makes good gear that kicks most of the mid-range stuff’s ass.  I guess truth is hard to read.

 

RDM2GO_Chauvet

So, below, Ford Sellers, the Senior Product Manager for the PRO line fixtures and equipment, is gonna tell you about the RDM2GO unit.

Here’s the official hoo-haa:  http://www.chauvetprofessional.com/products/rdm2go/

The RDM2go is a multi-functional tool for working with fixtures over a DMX/RDM data line. The palm-sized controller performs a multitude of tasks including RDM functionality, DMX snapshot and test-scene record and playback, Ilumicode addressing for Iluminarc fixtures and DMX input and output monitoring. The RDM2go also features a built in DMX cable integrity checker, and an easy to ready OLED display. The unit easily recharges via a standard micro USB jack and comes with a convenient carry pouch and connector convertors.

SO:

  • It’s a handheld tool for managing fixtures and systems with DMX, RDM, AND Ilumicode based control, which is bad ass because the Iluminarc line has some pretty beefy, punchy LED architectural units in its line.  it was one of my favorite things when I worked for Chauvet.
  • RDM2GO allows you to easily address, locate and monitor RDM capable fixtures.
  • This thing makes it so you can check DMX addressing, cabling, and store/playback basic snapshots.
  • Address and set personalities of Ilumicode based architectural fixtures (AWESOME)

This thing is pretty cool!  It also comes with some accessories:

RDM2GO_kit

What’s in the bag?

  • the RDM2go unit
  • the RDM2GO Carry Pouch
  • 2 pieces, 3- to 5-pin converters
  • 5-pin male to bare wire adaptor
  • USB-A Male to Micro USB-B Male (3 ft)

Portraits of Photographers With/Without Cameras

This is such a cool article!  Fubiz posted this a few weeks ago, I’m still catching up from getting ready for this upcoming training season!

So generally, Rich Johnson (the photog behind the photos) wanted to catch the expressions behind the cameras for these photographers.  Some of these are absolutely great!!!

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THIS guy below!  AWESOME goof face!

behind_the_mask_rich_johnson_5

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behind_the_mask_rich_johnson_2

David Bowie Has Now Become StarMan. RIP

There’s a starman waiting in the sky;
He’d like to come and meet us,
But he thinks he’d blow our minds.
There’s a starman waiting in the sky;
He’s told us not to blow it
‘Cause he knows it’s all worthwhile.
He told me:
Let the children lose it;
Let the children use it.
Let all the children boogie!
david_bowie_live
This news sucked to me almost as much as Robin Williams’ passing did.  Different idols, I guess.
David Bowie has passed on from Earth this morning.  I know everyone knows already, but I wanted to give my sympathies the best way I know how.
In case you haven’t seen it…  Lazarus, the last video he published, just shortly before his death, is fucking beautiful.  Dark, as one would expect we’d all feel at that time knowing the news he probably knew at that time, but it is just amazing.  Take a peek:

From the BBC article:

Singer David Bowie, one of the most influential musicians of his era, has died of cancer at the age of 69.

A statement was issued on his social media accounts, saying he “died peacefully, surrounded by his family” after an “18-month battle with cancer”.

Tributes have been paid from around the world to the “extraordinary artist” whose last album was released days ago.

Sir Paul McCartney described him as a “great star” who “played a very strong part in British musical history”.

Bowie’s son Duncan Jones, who is a Bafta-winning film director, wrote on Twitter: “Very sorry and sad to say it’s true. I’ll be offline for a while. Love to all.”

Ah, shit.  I’m sorry to David Bowie’s family.  I hope more people use his passing to learn more about the music he wrote that literally changes lives.  It’s that good.

Some links:

Al Jazeera:
http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2016/01/british-music-legend-david-bowie-dies-aged-69-160111101638026.html

CNN:
http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/11/entertainment/david-bowie-death/

General Twitter trending:
http://twitter.com/search?q=david+bowie+died&ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Esearch

The Independent:
http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/music/news/david-bowie-dead-singer-dies-after-18-month-battle-with-cancer-a6805826.html

Reuters:
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-people-bowie-death-idUSKCN0UP0KD20160111

UK Daily Mail:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-3393470/David-Bowie-dies-18-month-battle-cancer.html

USA Today:
http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/music/2016/01/11/david-bowie-dies-69/78617530/

The Guardian:
http://www.theguardian.com/music/2016/jan/11/david-bowie-dies-at-the-age-of-69

The Hollywood Reporter:
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/david-bowie-dead-legendary-artist-854364

New York Times, an AWESOME slideshow:
http://nyti.ms/1JEOGTM