OMICRON. High Speed Architainment.

I’m not really sure that I have words for the excellence that this contains.

O (Omicron) from Romain Tardy (AntiVJ) on Vimeo.

Romain Tardy and Thomas Vaquié are the creating artists on this one — from the AntiVJ Blog:

Last year, we were approached to create our first permanent installation for the new museum of architecture of Hala Stulecia, in Wroclaw, Poland. The piece – that we called O (Omicron), is actually the last part of the visit, and a way to create a link between the rich history of the building and the present times, by turning this massive concrete structure into a lively architecture.

When opened, Hala Stulecia was the largest reinforced concrete structure in the world. With a diameter of 65m it was home to the largest dome built since the Pantheon in Rome eighteen centuries earlier.
The Centennial Hall was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2006.

It is reasonable to think that when Hala Stulecia was built in 1913 Max Berg’s ambition for his construction was to pass the test of time. What could have been his vision of the monument in the distant future? How did he imagine the olding of the materials? The evolution of the surrounding urbanism and populations?

The piece proposed for the Centennial Hall of Wroclaw is based around the notion of timelessness in architecture, and the idea of what future has meant throughout the 20th century.

Taking the 1910’s as a starting point (the dome was erected in 1913), historical and artistic references were used to reveal the architecture of the space, its timeless and, more surprisingly, very modern dimension.

This building is called the Hala Stulecia (Centennial Hall); it’s a Max Berg structure, built when the German Empire was still owner of the city of WrocÅ‚aw.  Here’s the structure in a way that makes us lighting designers more comfortable, with truss and chain motors in it:

This building is amazing:

When opened, Hala Stulecia was the largest reinforced concrete structure in the world. With a diameter of 65m it was home to the largest dome built since the Pantheon in Rome eighteen centuries earlier. The Centennial Hall was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2006. Taking the 1910’s as a starting point (the dome was erected in 1913), historical and artistic references were used to reveal the architecture of the space, its timeless and, more surprisingly, very modern dimension.

A deliberately minimalist visual aesthetic allowed to highlight the very architecture of Hala Stulecia’s dome and re-affirm its place at the core of the piece.

Check out the “Making Of” video, too — below:

O (Omicron) / Making of from Romain Tardy (AntiVJ) on Vimeo.

Thanks, We Waste Time!  You guys are one of my favorite blogs lately!

Sunday JimOnLight Flickr Group Photo Pool

This is a pretty good Sunday, if I do say so myself.  I’m working on something awesome that is going to hit the web Wednesday morning — I’m going to be vague, but it has to do with this (and yes, I’m sorry it’s been more than two weeks, life’s been kinda high speed lately):

Yeah, it’s coming, finally.  JimOnLight TV Episode 1 in its various parts will be hitting the web on Wednesday morning, June 27, 2012!  Starring Jeff Waful and Umphrey’s McGee, Chauvet’s COLORado Batten 144 Tour are going to be the stars of Episode 1, and I’m excited to put this out there!  I’m about to release Vivien 2012 with CAST and we’re also banging away on wysiwyg R29, which has kept be unbelievably busy since I moved up here at the end of February.  I’m finally figuring out how to balance my career with my passion, and I am feeling pretty f*cking good about it!  Now if I can just get outside once in a while and get some sun, life will be even more sweet!

Check out a great Sunday’s worth of photographer’s contributions to our acceptance of beauty and art — have an amazing day, everybody!  Stop by the JimOnLight Flickr Group and join up, it’s completely free!

Bursting Out

quietly

B96 Summer Bash

REO Speedwagon

B96 Summer Bash

I miss you, little boy:
lumen on glowstick night

The Vortex

IMG_1069

2012mar4_2

Peace Face

Crazy Friday Science: Earth’s Magnetosphere

Direct from NASA — meet our Magnetosphere!

Ever see that movie with Nick Cage called Knowing?  Earth’s magnetosphere is the main premise of that movie, and its failure is the cause of the world’s destruction.  It’s not really that good when you realize that the aliens came to save the planet, which really turns the movie from a disaster movie (that I love) to something that has aliens saving us from ourselves.  Come on, aliens.  You really want Mitt Romney and John Boehner in your civilization?

Ha haa, I kid.  Nobody wants Mitt Romney and John Boehner in their civilizations…

From the video site:

Watch as this NASA animation shows the sun blasting out a giant explosion of magnetic energy called a coronal mass ejection and the Earth being shielded from this by its powerful magnetic field. The sun also continuously showers the Earth with light and radiation energy. Much of this solar energy is deflected by the Earth’s atmosphere or reflected back into space by clouds, ice and snow. What gets through becomes the energy that drives the Earth system, powering a remarkable planetary engine — the climate.

The unevenness of this solar heating, the cycles of day and night, and our seasons are part of what cause wind currents to circulate around the word. These winds drive surface ocean currents and in this animation you can view these currents flowing off the coast of Florida.

This animation connects for the first time a series of computer models. The view of the sun and the Earth’s magnetic field comes from the Luhmann-Friesen magnetic field model and two models that incorporated data from a real coronal mass ejection from the sun on December 2006.

NASA’s Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at Goddard Space Flight Center, a multi-agency partnership that provides information on space weather to the international research community, generated these two models. The ENLIL model is a time-dependent 3-D magnetohydrodynamic model of the heliosphere and shows changes in the particles flows and magnetic fields.
The BATS-R-US model is also a magnetohydrodynamic model of plasma from solar wind moving through the Earth’s magnetic dipole field. It uses measurements of solar wind density, velocity, temperature and magnetic field by NASA’s Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite, which launched in August of 1997 and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO), two satellites that view the structure and evolution of solar storms.

I hope this finds you well, world!  Happy Friday!

Wanna Whine about Wind Turbines? This Company Put Them Underwater

In a world where there are so many people who just whine about wind power because it’s fun to whine — a company, a power broker, and a country put together their collectively separate thinking caps and turned the problem upside down.  Meet the Andritz Hydro Hammerfest’s 1 Megawatt HS1000 Underwater Tidal Turbine, capable of powering 500 homes per single unit:

Right now in Scotland, a power broker called ScottishPower Renewables (which is a part of an even bigger conglomerate, Iberdrola, claiming a portfolio of over 14,000 megawatts of wind power generation) just put in the first one of ten 1 Megawatt units in Orkney, Scotland.  It’s generating power and is doing fine apparently, and between 2013 and 2015, that part of Scotland will have 10 Megawatts of tidal power.  That’s 10 million watts.  10,000,000 watts of completely renewable power.  Way to go, Scotland!

Some info about ANDRITZ HYDRO Hammerfest:

  • Hammerfest Strøm was established in 1997 in Hammerfest in Norway. The company’s main business is development of tidal stream turbines and the installation of tidal power arrays.
  • The subsidiary company Hammerfest Strøm UK established in Glasgow, Scotland is responsible for developing the British and Irish energy markets. Hammerfest Strøm UK also has a joint venture with ScottishPower Renewables.
  • ScottishPower Renewables is part of Iberdrola Renovables, the largest wind energy company in the world with an installed capacity of close to 11,000 MW at the end of 2009, and a pipeline of over 57,400 MW. ScottishPower Renewables had over 800 MW of installed capacity at the end of 2009, and a pipeline of 5,115 MW.

Also, a minute+ long piece from BBC News on the actual installation of the first HS1000, which was a pretty crappy day in seaman’s land:

Suck on that, complainers.  This is an awesome solution that will no doubt make some progress while we have to figure out how to appease the whiners who want to favor coal and oil over completely free wind power that is ever-present and never-ending.  Seems like a real waste of time, doesn’t it?  You know, to have to convince people that their vanity is less important than the collective progression of humanity?  Ah, the things I’ll never understand…

Editor’s note:

I’m sure that you’ve heard news out there from people who just don’t wanna see those dreadful wind turbines from the back deck of their house, and those whiners who don’t want wind turbines offshore because they are more expensive than their onshore counterparts.  I’ve also seen a complaint about “interfering with shipping routes.”  COME ON.  How can you make a grand claim like “offshore wind turbines will interfere with offshore shipping routes” without having first completely done every permutation and calculation of such a statement without the understanding that things like shipping routes can be re-arranged?

Maybe it needs to be said out loud:  we’re going to hit peak oil if we haven’t already, we’re going to either run out of coal or poison our atmosphere, and nuclear power is what it is — controlled chaos with no safe way to store the waste.  We’ve had three major nuclear accidents on this planet with respect to nuclear power generation, and each event (Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima) have already caused enough destruction for hundreds of years.  If we don’t get a grip on the actual problem and not let the big oil and coal companies continue to bank on future destruction, we will all be gone.  We have all we need, provided here on our planet, for everyone to have free power (and consequently free food, but that’s another post).  All we have to do is make it happen.

Thanks to DVICE, Inhabitat, BBC News, STV, and ScottishPower Renewables!

Super Mario Mushroom Lamp!

HAHA!  Ok, I played so much Super Mario and Super Mario 2 when I was a kid.  It was always fun playing with my sister (Mario 1 of course) when we were kids, but I’m sure I was a complete gamehog too.  Sorry, sis.

Check out the SUPER MARIO MUSHROOM LAMP!  These little gems are only twenty bucks!

GAAAAAA!  “Memories….”

The person selling them on Etsy is Emma Burges.  Twenty bucks, people!  She’ll make a green or red capped one for you, so you can either have your Super Mario “viagara mushroom” (thanks KP) or a 1UP mushroom!

Awesome.

Thanks Trendhunter, Waylou, and NerdApproved!

Sunday JimOnLight Flickr Group Photo Post

This is a particularly sad weekend in world events.  I find solace in the fact that tomorrow we will wake up and have another day on this planet — or we won’t.  My hope is always that JimOnLight.com reach way out of the mainstream and deep into the realm of the Third World, as it is so pitifully called; unfortunately, if you’re reading this today, you’re probably having first world problems.  Something not to forget in our own country is that we have lots of Third World sections of America — I always wonder how we can live in a world where some people have cutlery made from gold, and others don’t even have a certainty of a meal today.

Another stage collapse this weekend — this time in Toronto for a Radiohead show.  One dead, three wounded.

UN monitors have been pulled out of the Syrian state this weekend.  This is a huge deal if you’re not watching the news lately.  Bashar Al Assad has increasingly being accused of ethnic cleansing in his country.  Now that the monitors from the United Nations have been recalled from the country, let’s hope that we don’t see another situation like we’ve seen over the last few decades like we did in Rwanda.  Let’s hope that this doesn’t take the turn of what General Dallaire saw in Rwanda — when the UN was pulled out of Rwanda, 800,000 people died.  That’s right, I said 800,000 people were murdered.  It might be impossible to get an accurate figure of those killed since the uprising in Syria started, but the gist of the figures are near the 30,000 dead mark.  Almost 182,000 refugees have been made from people having to leave the fighting in Syria.

We may call ourselves a civilization, but we’re nowhere near civilized.  Make a loud noise — if it’s loud enough, others will make noise too.  We can stop this if we’re loud enough.

LIGHTS

Lighting

Light Painting Tools - Illuminated

Lights

A touch of light from the moon ° Series

Light in The Subway - Canyoneering in Zion National Park

Quality of Light

Lights

Light & Shadow

DSC_4125

Radiohead Stage Collapse in Toronto — 1 Dead, 3 Wounded

Scroll down for updates, please.

Oh no, not again.

My buddy Elie sent me this link from CBC News.  Radiohead‘s stage collapsed this afternoon — CBC News reports that a person is dead and at least 3 others are injured.  Toronto Star is reporting that it’s one dead and one injured critically.  It’s nice and calm here in Toronto today, I doubt this was weather-related.  From CBC News:

A stage at Toronto’s Downsview Park has collapsed in advance of a scheduled Radiohead concert, killing one person and injuring at least three, according to Toronto EMS.

Calls came in to emergency crews at about 4 p.m. ET. One person was transported to Sunnybrook Hospital in serious condition while two others assessed at the scene have minor injuries.

CBC’s Maria Nunes was driving by the park when she noticed the commotion. From her vantage point. she could see five ambulances, two police cars and a firetruck.

The 7:30 p.m. concert is cancelled. Gates had been scheduled to open at 5 p.m.

Some people at the park ahead of the show are saying on Twitter that the area has been cleared by emergency crews.

Police say the park wasn’t full but there was a considerable crowd of people already waiting for the show, and they are now leaving the area. The park is a frequent site of concerts, and 40,000 people were expected for tonight’s sold-out show by the hugely popular English band. The opener was to be Canadian act Caribou.

The weather in Toronto at the time of the accident was seemingly calm, with temperatures in the high 20s and the forecast calling for light winds.

More as it develops.  Radiohead was playing at Downsview Park near downtown for the North by Northeast Festival.  They’ve since cancelled the show.

Somebody taped the news broadcast below:

Update, Saturday, 7:13pm Eastern:

Most reports are saying that one person was killed, and the consensus is either three wounded or “several” wounded.  I spoke with a friend who was heading down early to see the Flaming Lips show later in the evening, and she said that there are lots of folks heading away from the Downsview Park area.  Police are asking people not to head to the area so that everything can be secured and investigated.

Story at the Montreal Gazette
Story at the Globe and Mail
Story at the Guardian
Story at the Province
Story at Canada.com
Story at NowPublic

I’m so sorry to have to report of the injured and killed again.  That is my least favorite part of writing.

More as I find it.  I’m not sure if this is even the time to bring it up, but there’s a creep around the place that Radiohead is playing at Sneaky Pete’s tonight; something not a rumor is that all ticket holders are being refunded for the show.

From NowPublic:

Update, Sunday, June 17, 5:51pm:

CNN posted an aerial flyby and an article of the Toronto stage that came down yesterday.  See below:

Thanks, @mcpoley, for tweeting the link.

—————————————————————-
Update, Monday, June 18, 2012, 9:55am:

I have to report that the name of the one man killed has been released.  Radiohead (and Keane) drum tech Scott Johnson, 33, was killed by what investigators are calling “a heavy, crushing injury.”  I’m so sorry to have to report that.  Another industry veteran down.  Investigations are being called “fairly complex,” but none of the outside investigation parties are being named at this time.

From the Toronto Star:

The provincial Ministry of Labour remained tight-lipped Sunday on details surrounding a stage collapse at Downsview Park that killed a drum technician for Radiohead and forced the cancellation of a sold-out show.

A spokesperson for the British band identified the drum technician as Scott Johnson, 33, of Doncaster, England. Johnson also toured with another U.K. band Keane.

“He was a lovely man, always positive, supportive and funny; a highly skilled and valued member of our great road crew,” Radiohead wrote on its website. “We will miss him very much.”

As three inspectors and two engineers from the ministry scoured the scene Sunday, it remained unclear what caused the massive structure to crumble, crushing Johnson and injuring three others.

Johnson was pronounced dead at the scene after sustaining what police said was a “heavy, crushing injury.”

Ministry spokesperson Matt Blajer said the investigation is “fairly complex” but could not confirm the names of any involved companies.

Meanwhile, industry professionals are questioning the circumstances leading up to the fatal accident, which occurred on an otherwise bright and sunny day, with only light winds.

From Radiohead‘s website:

We have all been shattered by the loss of Scott Johnson, our friend and colleague. He was a lovely man, always positive, supportive and funny; a highly skilled and valued member of our great road crew. We will miss him very much. Our thoughts and love are with Scott’s family and all those close to him.

Rest in peace, Scott Johnson.  More as it develops.

Laser Tattoo Removal?! It’s Like A SKIN ERASER!

First — no, I’m never getting my tattoos removed, and yes, I plan on getting both sleeves!  A friend sent me a link, and boom — there was a dude getting his tattoos removed.  Take a moment and check this out, it is actually quite amazing:

Whoa.

This process of laser tattoo removal is called laser ablation, or even better — selective photothermolysis.  That’s certainly a five dollar word, isn’t it?  If you break it down it’s pretty simple:  photo means light, thermo means heat, and lysis means destruction.  So destruction using light and heat.  Can you dig it?  To put this into perspective of, say, the entertainment industry, laser ablation is used to make glass and/or metal gobos, and can be done with ridiculous precision.  Ridiculous.  Laser Ablation is something that typically uses a pulsed laser because of its high power; when something is laser ablated, the power and temperature is usually at such a magnitude that the material being removed is often plasma-fied or just vaporized altogether.

Wanna get really nerdy with me?  I also checked out a paper called Optimizing Outcomes of Laser Tattoo Removal, talking about different wavelengths and laser types.  Yes, it’s interesting!

Hey, did I mention that video above has a guy basically getting his tattoos erased?!

Thanks, LikeCool! 

LIDAR Helps Scientists Add Mass to Dinosaurs

…and all of it without having to use the strawberry milkshake protein powder that I got from Walmart.  That stuff was horrible!!!

One of my favorite laser publications, Optics.org, posted this awesome article — dinosaur skeletons, LIDAR, and imagining the mass of dinosaurs when they were alive.  The article is pretty cool, check it out here.

From the article:

A team at the University of Manchester has developed a new method for doing so that shows promise, by applying a lidar scanning technique to one of the largest mounted dinosaur skeletons in the world. The findings are published in Biology Letters.

Starting from the principle that the best estimates of dinosaur mass come from a volumetric approach, whereby a model of the animal is created and its mass then calculated via its density, the team scanned a complete skeleton using a lidar scanner supplied by Z+F, specialists in laser scanning and data capture.

I had to know more about this LIDAR business — LIDAR means Light Detection and Ranging.  From the wikipedia:

In general there are two kinds of lidar detection schema: “incoherent” or direct energy detection (which is principally an amplitude measurement) and Coherent detection (which is best for doppler, or phase sensitive measurements). Coherent systems generally use Optical heterodyne detection which being more sensitive than direct detection allows them to operate a much lower power but at the expense of more complex transceiver requirements.

In both coherent and incoherent LIDAR, there are two types of pulse models: micropulse lidar systems and high energy systems. Micropulse systems have developed as a result of the ever increasing amount of computer power available combined with advances in laser technology. They use considerably less energy in the laser, typically on the order of one microjoule, and are often “eye-safe,” meaning they can be used without safety precautions. High-power systems are common in atmospheric research, where they are widely used for measuring many atmospheric parameters: the height, layering and densities of clouds, cloud particle properties (extinction coefficient, backscatter coefficient, depolarization), temperature, pressure, wind, humidity, trace gas concentration (ozone, methane, nitrous oxide, etc.).[1]

There are several major components to a LIDAR system:

  1. Laser — 600–1000 nm lasers are most common for non-scientific applications. They are inexpensive, but since they can be focused and easily absorbed by the eye, the maximum power is limited by the need to make them eye-safe. Eye-safety is often a requirement for most applications. A common alternative, 1550 nm lasers, are eye-safe at much higher power levels since this wavelength is not focused by the eye, but the detector technology is less advanced and so these wavelengths are generally used at longer ranges and lower accuracies. They are also used for military applications as 1550 nm is not visible in night vision goggles, unlike the shorter 1000 nm infrared laser. Airborne topographic mapping lidars generally use 1064 nm diode pumped YAG lasers, while bathymetric systems generally use 532 nm frequency doubled diode pumped YAG lasers because 532 nm penetrates water with much less attenuation than does 1064 nm. Laser settings include the laser repetition rate (which controls the data collection speed). Pulse length is generally an attribute of the laser cavity length, the number of passes required through the gain material (YAG, YLF, etc.), and Q-switch speed. Better target resolution is achieved with shorter pulses, provided the LIDAR receiver detectors and electronics have sufficient bandwidth.[1]
  2. Scanner and optics — How fast images can be developed is also affected by the speed at which they are scanned. There are several options to scan the azimuth and elevation, including dual oscillating plane mirrors, a combination with a polygon mirror, a dual axis scanner (see Laser scanning). Optic choices affect the angular resolution and range that can be detected. A hole mirror or a beam splitter are options to collect a return signal.
  3. Photodetector and receiver electronics — Two main photodetector technologies are used in lidars: solid state photodetectors, such as silicon avalanche photodiodes, or photomultipliers. The sensitivity of the receiver is another parameter that has to be balanced in a LIDAR design.
  4. Position and navigation systems — LIDAR sensors that are mounted on mobile platforms such as airplanes or satellites require instrumentation to determine the absolute position and orientation of the sensor. Such devices generally include a Global Positioning System receiver and an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU).

This scanning technology is actually pretty widely used all over the place — along with terrestrial map data from suppliers, the GPS companies’ travel vans are mostly fitted with LIDAR scanners.  These scanners are actually pretty cool – the company listed in the article, Z+F UK, has some particularly interesting looking devices!  Also, Radiohead apparently used lots of LIDAR capture to film their House of Cards video.  Here’s a bit of them doing some scanning work:

Crazy.  Also, if you’re one of those nerds like me who likes to comb through the images and content on places like NOAA and see the output from satellites at the various observation stations, check out the LIDAR stuff at the USGS (US Geological Survey) website.

The John Allen Lamp Project

Doesn’t that sound like a fusion jazz quartet starring some crazy bass player who has dreadlocks?  His bass is all paint-erroded from all of the years he spent playing bass in smoky little jazz clubs in groups with names like Steven Tyler PJs and Neil McKarren’s Big Fat Bootie.  But in the case of the John Allen Lamp Project, it’s nothing but smooth sailing for our imaginary bass player friend I just invented because I should get out more.

Check this out:

This is an animation of John Allen’s lamp — plywood, sturdy, taking the idea of using construction materials as the fore element to a new level.  That’s how I see it.  You can also go to John’s Instructables and make your own.  John Allen is just that awesome, as the best work should be.  Free for all to enjoy.  Thanks, John, this rocks!

Screenshots of the Instructables page from John’s Instructables project on the John Allen Lamp project.  Check it out.