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.PSLAB Beirut and MYBAR

Wow, good morning world.  I have to apologize for the last week of relative dead space – I put in about 90 hours last week and toured my design of The Light in the Piazza to a theatre in Arkansas.  It’s been a crazy week!

But to welcome the little bit of sanity I am holding onto right now, I want to post about a new project that PSLAB in Beirut has done.  I got this from my pal Ramsey at the .PSLAB Beirut offices – I have to say that any time I get info from .PSLAB, I have been so impressed.  I get a lot of images from lighting firms all over the world, and .PSLAB produces some of my favorite works.  Their designs are just so worldly and original.

Check out the design for MYBAR, a new bar/restaurant in Beirut.  Some info from .PSLAB:

A bar/restaurant whose space is functionally divided into 3 areas; an entrance corridor, a drinking area, and a dining area. The entrance corridor leads to the drinking area which is separated from the dining area by an irregular shaped staircase extending from a rugged wall starting at the end of the corridor.

We used a line of uplights to light the entrance pathway and connect it to the drinking area.
The uplights continue parallel to the rugged wall and stairs producing a play of shadows created by the different layers in the wall.
The drinking area features floor to ceiling poles carrying small cups’ stands.
To accentuate the curvature of these poles, we set downlights at the top end of each creating a vertical beam of light detached from the rod.

The dining area is characterized by visible white ducts covering the ceiling and maintained over a two-level bar connecting the dining area to the drinking area. The furniture layout in this area follows the layout of those ducts.
We chose to use the visible ducts in order to create a lighting system unifying the two main sections of the space (drinking/dining). Hence, we developed lighting fixtures in white finish, fixed to the ceiling on the sides of the ducts. To have a rectangular horizontal beam of light centered over the tables, a gap created by the circular opening of the duct defines the shapes of the objects.
Continuing over the bar, the light objects are set on one side of the duct and in opposite directions in order to light the path behind the bar. Similarly for the sushi bar in the other end of the space.

Click on each of the images, they open into a gallery!

Beautiful.

Burgundy – A New .PSLAB Beiruit Lighting Design Project

My favorite Lebanese lighting design firm, .PSLAB out of Beirut, has just finished another interesting project – a wine bar/restaurant called Burgundy.  I just heard from my pal Ramsi at the firm this morning, and I am excited to share the project images!

From the .PSLAB press release:

A lighting project for a wine bar/restaurant having a substructure of wooden arched beams cutting through a wire mesh covering the ceiling. The setting of the space underneath the substructure is functionally divided into two sections: a bar area and a dining area.

Highlighting the dual function, the lighting objects are set on two parallel axes over these two sections.

Suspended from the arcs, each light object is a set of conical tubes conceived to fill a circular-shaped area. Clustering in the circle, the tubes start at the center; moving radially, they begin to deviate at an angle of 25 degrees to reach an angle of 45 degrees. This deviation renders a chandelier-like object, with a bottom curved outline opposite to that of the ceiling. The cluster of the tubes housing the bulbs creates an effect of a singular light source being filtered.

The entrance is lit by a set of black projectors also using the arched beams for fixation; the groove in the beams encloses the technical parts box, while the head of the projector is left loose to rotate shedding light in different directions.

A lighting project for a wine bar/restaurant having a substructure of wooden arched beams cutting through a wire mesh covering the ceiling.The setting of the space underneath the substructure is functionally divided into two sections: a bar area and a dining area.Highlighting the dual function, the lighting objects are set on two parallel axes over these two sections.Suspended from the arcs, each light object is a set of conical tubes conceived to fill a circular-shaped area. Clustering in the circle, the tubes start at the center; moving radially, they begin to deviate at an angle of 25 degrees to reach an angle of 45 degrees. This deviation renders a chandelier-like object, with a bottom curved outline opposite to that of the ceiling.

The cluster of the tubes housing the bulbs creates an effect of a singular light source being filtered.The entrance is lit by a set of black projectors also using the arched beams for fixation; the groove in the beams encloses the technical parts box, while the head of the projector is left loose to rotate shedding light in different directions.

Cool!  My other favorite type of lighting design is architectural and interior – so these kinds of projects always thrill me to write about whenever they come across the desk!

Check out some images – and make SURE to check out .PSLAB’s website!

Thanks, Ramsi!

PSLAB Beirut Lights Al Dente, Now It’s Well Done

Ha haaa, pardon the wordplay there, sometimes I just cannot help myself.  I just got word from my pal Ramsey at .PSLAB Beirut that the firm has just completed another concept project!  PSLAB is one of my top five favorite lighting design firms on the planet – they’re like my Chicago Blackhawks of the architectural lighting design world.

Press release below, then awesome imagery.  Ramsey, tell everybody I said excellent work!

Al Dente Restaurant, Beirut- Lebanon

.PSLAB BEIRUT was asked to develop a lighting concept for al dente restaurant in beirut–lebanon.
The high ceiling restaurant is divided into 3 areas: the main central area containing the entrance and the main hall, a secondary hall and a bar area.
We developed twig-like metallic fixtures to be mounted in clusters at the center axis connecting the entrance to the main hall.
For the secondary hall and bar area, we developed superposed brass discs carrying the light source and fixed to the ceiling by means of a metallic rod. The linear layout of the fixtures and the continuity of the line of light defines the depth of the spaces.

Check ‘em out:

Thanks, Ramsey!

WORKS.PSLAB and the Monte Carlo Beach Hotel

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I just got an email from Ramsay at PSLAB in Beiruit just a little bit ago – PSLAB’s work continues to impress me.  Check out this press release and images below:

WORKS.PSLAB was approached by Paris-based architect India Mahdavi in order to develop a lighting concept for a typical room setting and lobby areas for the renovated Monte-Carlo Beach Hotel, Monte-Carlo S.B.M.

The main lobby area is characterized by a very high ceiling topped with a dome-like recess, as if bringing together a cycloidal transition of the space walls.  Ceiling mounted fixtures are conceived to light the space and accentuate the ceiling pit.  Having different axes heights, the fixtures are set to cluster around the tallest-axis fitting moving to the shortest-axis fitting in a radial manner, creating an inverted cone-shaped light source.  The fixtures are made from metal sheets laser-cut into leaf-like shapes with a ring for fixation. The hammering technique used to achieve the curvature of the sheets gives each its unique texture. The overlapping of multiple leaves gives a rotational impression resulting in a diffused light effect. A system of superimposed short discs combines the sheets allowing them to rotate around its axis in two directions, hence allowing multiple settings.  The lamp is enclosed inside the fixation system and the glossy finish of the leaves reflects the light coming out from differently positioned slits on the discs.  These fittings are then adapted to be wall mounted in single or double units to light the restaurant and staircases.

The typical room features a short entrance corridor leading to a sleeping area with a curved corner containing the sitting area. The length of the corridor is highlighted by inserting narrow recessed down lights in the ceiling along its path. The corner space, not visible from the entrance door, is emphasized by tailor-made white on white metal cylinders developed for installation in groups of two of different size. Each houses an off-centered fluorescent light source that is sunken and concealed within the body in order to provide a glare-free ambient light. A third element is set in the corridor as a hint for the lighting objects inside.

The layout of the three objects is then reworked to conform with the settings of the different room types.

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PSLAB’s JAR

I could not wait to post this!  I just got an email from Ramzi, the spokesman at .PSLAB (you know, PSLAB), who sent me the details for “Jar,” a lamp using the efficient G28d lamp.  From Ramzi at .PSLAB:

Brief was to develop a light fixture using the G28d energy saving lamp. Proposal is a commonly used jar that can be purchased from any store off the shelf. When closed, it is sealed from outside hazards such as water. The jar is the package. The lamp within it becomes an IP rated fixture.

These images are cool – this is a great idea!  I use a few of these types of jars in our home, and in addition to being pretty airtight, they’re also very strong – I bounced my pint jar off of the tile floor in the kitchen, and the darned thing bounced!

WORKS.PLSAB and Cynthia Zahar Do MAKAR

My pal Jules sent me this great link – Interior designer Cynthia Zahar approached the Beirut firm WORKS.PSLAB about developing a lighting concept for the MAKAM Art Gallery – the fixtures are functional art within themselves.  .PSLAB spokesman Ramzi Haddad said, when discussing the concept:

“Our proposal was to develop a custom made projector that was placed on the center line between the I beams on a base-plate that can take a bracket with one or two heads. Some plates work as individual points ready for additional projectors while avoiding overloading the ceiling with pre-fixed ones.”

I wrote an article about PSLAB a little while ago, with their project for DOS Architects.  As I was digging around for this article, I discovered in addition to MoCoLoco‘s article that Yatzer also had an article about PSLAB’s work on this project.  Regarding the interior:

The 4.5m ceiling high is transversally cut by a set of I beams. The entire space is painted white except for the stone arcade that appears twice, mid-way and towards the end. The space reads as one when looking at it from the outside. “Our aim was to preserve that reading while providing the owner with the required flexibility of light depending on the painting exhibited. Our proposal was to develop a custom made projector that was placed on the centerline between the I beams on a base-plate that can take a bracket with one or two heads. Some plates work as individual points ready for additional projectors while avoiding overloading the ceiling with pre-fixed ones.”

Beautiful work, PSLAB!