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Does This LED Middle Finger Count as Road Rage?

I get a metric ton of emails from LED manufacturing companies located all over the world.  You know the ones – if you’ve ever done a search on Google for “lighting” or entered your email address into a subscription list, you’ve probably gotten spammed with something like this:

Dear Sir:

It has been long time for communication with you.  at the beginning of 2010, we have launched some new led bulb and lightings.

You can visit our website to download our 2010 catalogue, [website address redacted]

If you want to download, please contact me to get the account to download the files.

[name redacted]
Dreamy Lighting Co., LTD

Normally these come with some kind of PDF full of blatant copies of good brands like Martin’s Mac 2000, along with LED striplights, wall washers, and other inexpensive LED lighting.  It’s been this way with manufacturers in this area for many years – when white LED manufacturing made its debut, companies bombarded the world with cheap quality and cost white LED products.  When CFLs got huge, same thing.

Sometimes the products (and English translations) are absolutely ridiculous, and sometimes it is overwhelmingly hilarious.  I just got one from a company (that I shall not name because they CONSTANTLY SPAM ME) that had a pretty funny product being advertised – an LED sign for the inside of your car that sends visual messages to the car behind you, up to and including the middle finger.  Meet the “CAR Emotion Light”:

What a phenomenally hilarious idea.  Note the middle finger  icon that you can display in gleaming red LED light for your already late for dinner angry road raging Hummer driver you just cut off.

Epic win.

OH GOD, THEY TATTOOED THEIR EYEBALLS

So last night I was lying in bed looking at the news, and all of the sudden I click on something that to me read as “prison inmates tattoo eyeballs.”  What it actually was completely shocked me, so I figured, hey – I bet JimOnLight readers would LOVE this (or totally despise it), so I should certainly post about it.

The video below depicts nothing about the actual performing of the subject matter, just the results, but it’s still freaky.

These prison inmates tattooed the sclera of their eyeballs!  Can you believe that?!  How were they sure that they were only injecting that “ink” into their sclera only? I mean, under the right circumstances and on your skin tattoos can and usually do look pretty neat.  But your EYE?  Don’t they know how important that is?!  There is a reason that people who sustain damage to their eyes or even a single eye lose their vision – to my knowledge, we cannot manufacture or generate vitreous gel for the eye.  Once it’s gone, it’s gone.

Holy cow.  The second subject interviewed in the film is in prison for 73 years, so more than likely he doesn’t have to worry about ever having non-prison employment again – but the other guy (the one with the red eyes) is in for 4 years.  Both of these men are going to have disciplinary action taken against them.

The subject said that they have no color tint in their vision, and that they still see fine. For now. I wonder what was in that “ink” they used.

Watch the video:

What? Japanese Fluorescent Lamp Battle

WARNING:
This is really violent and pretty bloody.  I listed it here because of its complete lack of sanity.

Seriously, consider this a warning.

To be completely honest, I am really unsure as to what to say in this situation.  Apparently there are ring fights in Japan that are fought with fluorescent tubes.  What’s the point here – first man to get hydrargyria first wins?

I am at a loss for words.

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Holy cow!

Click the link for more nasty photos and even a gross video.
Read more

What? Ohio Public Utilities Commission and FirstEnergy’s $10.80 Stupidity

What?

Have you ever had a volunteer come to your door with a free compact fluorescent lamp?  When my wife and I lived in Oklahoma City,  a community program volunteer brought a free compact fluorescent lamp to our house for us to have and use in order to save energy.  How nice, right?  We thought so.  A public utility, FirstEnergy in Ohio, set up a program (that was approved by the Ohio Public Utilities Commission, by the way) that distributes compact fluorescent lamps to customers in Ohio.

Cool program, right?  Free fluorescent lamps for all.  Except they’re not free – FirstEnergy will be charging their customers $10.80 each for the lamps, automatically, with no opt-out program.  Hold on a minute – for $10 I can go down to Target, Home Depot, or Lowes’ and buy a half-dozen compact fluorescent lamps.  What’s with this $10.80 per lamp crap?

Last year, the Ohio state government passed a bill saying that utilities had to cut their customers’ usage 22% by the year 2025.  Apparently this is how FirstEnergy is going about reducing energy usage – by charging customers way, way too much for something that people can buy on their own for 1/6 the price.

An article from John Funk at the Plain Dealer in Cleveland states:

FirstEnergy bought Chinese-made bulbs from three distributors including TCP Inc. of Aurora, because it couldn’t find any made in the United States. A California company will deliver 3 million of them door-to-door to Illuminating Co., Ohio Edison and Toledo Edison customers. The rest will be mailed.

Passing out the bulbs is not the way to persuade people to use them, Migden-Ostrander said. The company should have given its customers discount coupons and let them shop for the best deal, she said.

The company’s lawyers resisted that, arguing that FirstEnergy had to begin cutting back power deliveries right away to meet the terms of the new law.

Hmm.  You know what really sucks about this?  If you have seen the letter from FirstEnergy VP of Customer Service John Paganie, it seems like they’re giving these lamps away for free:

We are pleased to provide you with two energy-efficient CFLs. When you install these bulbs in place of two 100-watt incandescent bulbs in your home, you could save about $30 over the life of each bulb.  Here’s how:

Traditional incandescent bulbs cost less to buy than CFLs, but they might only last 750 hours. Your new CFLs should last 10,000 hours, which is 10 times as long. This means you would need to buy more than 13 traditional bulbs to equal the lifespan of one CFL.

Also, your new CFLs will use 75 percent less electricity than a standard 100-watt incandescent bulb, and will produce the same amount of light. When you combine the longer life and decreased energy usage of the CFL, you can see significant, long-term savings for each bulb you replace.

FirstEnergy’s Ohio utility companies – The Illuminating Company, Ohio Edison and Toledo Edison – are providing these light bulbs to residential customers in Ohio.

We’re dedicated to helping our customers reduce the amount of electricity they use while increasing their energy efficiency. These CFLs are just one simple way you can improve energy efficiency in your home. We’ve also enclosed a booklet with more than 100 energy-saving tips.
For additional information, please visit firstenergycorp.com/energyefficiency.

Thanks, and enjoy your two compact fluorescent light bulbs!

Sincerely,
John Paganie
FirstEnergy Vice President of Energy Efficiency and Customer Service

What the hell.  Doesn’t this seem like a bit of a misleading statement?  I think it does, and apparently thousands of Ohioans also thought it did, because the Ohio Public Utilities Commission, who approved the program in the first place, has turned around and said that they have now asked FirstEnergy to postpone the start of the program until someone knows what on Earth it is going to cost, and what exactly is going on.  From the Consumerist website, a pro-consumer news site (I’m sure you know who they are), who posted the response from the PUCO on the FirstEnergy backlash:

“The PUCO has received a large volume of calls and emails in response to the compact fluorescent light bulb program approved last month for FirstEnergy. Today, I received a letter from Gov. Strickland asking that the PUCO postpone the program until such time as we can address several questions raised by the governor, members of the Ohio General Assembly and FirstEnergy customers related to program details and costs.

As a result, I have asked FirstEnergy to postpone deployment of its compact fluorescent light bulb program until the Commission can thoroughly assess the costs associated with this program. The PUCO approved the program following consensus reached during discussions among the company and other organizations including the Office of the Ohio Consumers’ Counsel and the Natural Resources Defense Council.

Although the PUCO allowed FirstEnergy to implement its program, we did not approve the charge that will appear on monthly bills as a result. Reports in the media place the cost to customers at sixty cents per month for three years, which equates to $21.60 over the life of the program. The PUCO has not approved these additional dollars nor have we received a request by the company to do so.

The PUCO will gather additional information regarding the program and its related costs. Until the PUCO has specific details regarding the program costs, FirstEnergy should not deploy its compact fluorescent light bulb program.”

I’ll be watching for more information on this ridiculance. If you have any more news about the program, please contact me via the contact form and I will get that info published right now.

A record of the legal case for this ridiculance is here – it’s a dry read, but interesting nonetheless.

If Duct Tape Could Slap Your Hand Before You Apply It…

Ok, I know we’ve seen stuff much worse than this in our lifetimes as professionals working with light – but this is pretty stupendously wrong.  My buddy Erich Friend, an engineer, safety consultant, and CEO of Teqniqal Systems writes a blog about Theatre Safety at – you guessed it – the Theatre Safety Blog!  Erich posted the monstrosity below as a quick reminder on what not to do, ever.  Never.

Can you count the things wrong in this picture?

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Check out The Theatre Safety Blog – Erich’s a knowledgeable dude!

The Nirvana LED Bathtub – Yes, A Bathtub With LEDs.

So, sometimes there are things that get marketed to people with lots and lots and lots of money.  There are also times when companies develop things that are only achievable by people of a very high income bracket.  This specific time might be both of those times together.  To be fair, there isn’t a price listed on the website, but my spidey-sense tells me that it’s probably not $250 dollars.

Meet the Nirvana LED Bathtub – a completely touch-controlled LED bathtub with 360 LEDs embedded into the surface:

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See that display in the lower right corner?  It’s upside down in that picture, but it’s an onboard readout of the temperature of the water – which can be changed with your hand motions.  A tub that boasts chromatherapy, digital readouts, complete control, and automatic-ness.  What else do you need, I guess?  I wonder how much this thing is going to retail for when it hits the market?  Like anything else that’s expensive, once you buy it, attractive women will flock to your bathroom.

Oh yeah, and this tub won a Red Dot award.

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Here’s one of the company’s other models – LEDs in a different configuration:

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Thanks, Born Rich!

What? “Alien” Light from Büro für Form

I am really curious as to what planet this Alien light comes from – the Alien Light from Büro für Form looks suspiciously like a sperm.  It’s certainly a statement – the fixture is wrapped around the power cable as if it were descending downward (or upward?) in all of its curly protozoa goodness.  The Alien fixture is currently retailing at $529 US (say whaaaaat?), and is part of the NEXT Home Collection.

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Thanks, Generate!

No Frosted Lamps in the EU Soon? Meet the Euro Condom!

In September the European Union will be implementing a ban on frosted incandescent lamps.  A ban – on frosted lamps.  I don’t really get this, do you?  The argument (well, not really an argument, it’s passed) is that clear lamps give off more lumens than frosted lamps.

Hold on, what? I’ll write a bit more about that soon, but in protest to this interesting ridiculous ban, artists are designing new and interesting ways to say go fornicate with yourself to the silly rule.  One of those ways is from Ingo Maurer, who has given the world the Euro Condom – a high temperature latex cover for clear incandescent lamps, which are going to still be legal:

eurocondom

Yeah, it’s a rubber for clear incandescent lamps.  An interesting commentary, yes?  I enjoy the statement, although I’d just rather have the frosted lamps back in service.  I mean, aren’t frosted lamps like one of the most purchased lamp types ever?

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euro_condom_ingo

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Thanks, DeZeen and Debate Europe!

Cellular Call Receiving Light-Up Dress 1, Cure for Cancer 0

cell dress

What?

I just read an article about a dress that lights up when a cell call is received.  Tennis pro Maria Sharapova recently unveiled the dress for reporters and other photographer-types in front of a store in London.  Honestly, I have to say I’m relieved – I was hoping someone would solve this problem as soon as possible.

That last bit of commentary was sarcasm, in case you missed it.  Here’s a snippet from the Reuters article on this story:

British fashion student Georgie Davies dreamed up the knee-length short-sleeved white dress as part of a school project with mobile phone-maker Sony Ericsson to figure out ways of incorporating new technology into fashion.

Davies said the dress is designed to eventually be connected to the wearer’s phone by Bluetooth wireless technology, so she can be alerted to a call even in noisiest of places.

“When you’re in a pub or a bar, you can never, ever hear your phone,” 20-year-old Davies told Reuters on Wednesday.

One shoulder of the dress down to the hip is embellished with translucent white scales that move and light up.

Society is so much better now that we can see every time someone gets a call.  It’s not enough that people’s cell phones are glued to the side of their faces.  It’s not that I think the technology is silly, I think it is great that we can incorporate such luxury things.  I’d just rather see a dress that can regulate blood sugar or dialysis or something of value.

Thanks, Dvice and Reuters!