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8 MATH Talks That Will Blow Your MIND. Yes, MATH!

shaft-damn-right

Once more, hell yes I am talking about MATH!

[shut yo mouth]

No, no, it’s true, I am speaking of MATH.  As in AWESOME math.  As in TED TALKS MATH!

You have to see these speeches and TED Talks on Math.  You have to trust in me that these are not as boring as MATH may sound to you…  but to those of us who want to change the world, this stuff is essential!  There are eight talks on the TED Talks website, which YOU MUST SEE.  However, here’s a few of my favorites…  I hope they change your life!

Ron Eglash: Fractals at the Heart of African Designs

Arthur Benjamin Does “MatheMagic!”

Last but definitely not least or final — Benoit Mandelbrot – Fractals and the Art of Roughness

Go check out the rest of the TED Talks on Math!  Great, great stuff, people!  Nothing at all like high school calc, this is fun, beautiful, lovely math!

STOP WHAT YOU ARE DOING and Watch Olafur Eliasson at TED 2009

Okay, I know that you have five minutes to take your brain and expand it further than it is wide right this instant.

Stop what you’re doing.
Get comfortable so you can learn.
Press play on this video below.

It’s of Olafur Eliasson at Ted 2009 – he’s talking about using space, color, and light.  You need this right now.

David Gallo Talks Underwater Illumination at TED

Bio-luminescence in sea creatures is a phenomena that I have been interested in for some time – Mother Nature is an amazingly psychopathic mommy figure full of very interesting adaptations of human and animal behavior.  Things like bio-luminescence, Circadian Rhythm, and the body’s generation of Melatonin are all things that fall under this category.  Mother Nature,  you so crazy!

A scientist and underwater explorer named David Gallo talked at TED back in 2007 about this very phenomenon.  Check out the video below – you won’t be disappointed.  David says that we’ve discovered about 3% of our planet, and every time that we find a new place in the ocean, it is usually filled with exciting new discoveries.

SixthSense – Pranav Mistry’s Genius Idea

I hope that a billion times more people know about the TED Talks than know about JimOnLight.com.

The TED people have some of the most unbelievably intelligent people gravitating around them – or perhaps more accurately, they are revolving around a body of smarts to massive that I have not yet to this day been disappointed with.  So much, in fact, that I ended that sentence with a preposition just thinking about it’s awesomeness.

Okay, I’m not gonna say too much about what the subject in the video below is, but I want you all to just imagine having a small device on your person that could do everything you could think of, including making calls.  Oh wait, you’re thinking – I have an iPhone for that.  So do I, and I love it.  But imagine that, instead of interacting with your iPhone on it’s terms, the device interacted with your daily existence on your turf.

A few weeks ago one of my former Sweden colleagues (thanks, Kunal!) sent around  a TED video on something called “SixthSense” – a technology that basically takes the idea behind carrying around a display and turns it upside down and several angles of the meridian towards ridiculously awesome.  That all make sense?  The guy behind the mystery, Pranav Mistry, has created a device that has a high level of intellect, and projects data with light onto the surfaces in your life.

This idea is mindblowing.  I am turned upside down with this idea.  Thank you, Pranav.  Can I buy you a beer?

Check out this video, you owe it to yourself:

TED Talks – Pranav Mistry and the SixthSense Technology from Jim Hutchison on Vimeo.

TED Talks: Beau Lotto, The Eyes, and The Power of Reality

Have you ever heard of the TED Talks?  TED Talks are lectures from remarkable people in the world, and they’re all free.  The best thing about the TED talks is that not only are they free (like all helpful and inspiring ideas should be) but they are actually something that gives you insight into the mind of someone truly interested in improving the world.

As you can imagine, something that deals with light and that is inspiring is of great interest to me.  I just found a great TED talk – perfect for your Friday morning in the office or at home sipping that first (or second, I suppose, at least in my case) cup of coffee.  Meet Beau Lotto – he’s a guy who is shedding light onto the long time mystery of the brain’s complex visual system.  From TED’s website about why you should watch this video:

“Let there be perception,” was evolution’s proclamation, and so it was that all creatures, from honeybees to humans, came to see the world not as it is, but as was most useful. This uncomfortable place — where what an organism’s brain sees diverges from what is actually out there — is what Beau Lotto and his team at Lottolab are exploring through their dazzling art-sci experiments and public illusions. Their Bee Matrix installation, for example, places a live bee in a transparent enclosure where gallerygoers may watch it seek nectar in a virtual meadow of luminous Plexiglas flowers. (Bees, Lotto will tell you, see colors much like we humans do.) The data captured isn’t just discarded, either: it’s put to good use in probing scientific papers, and sometimes in more exhibits.

Outside the studio work, the brain-like (that is, multidisciplinary) organization is also branching out to bigger public engagement works. It’s holding regular “synesthetic workshops” where kids and adults make “color scores” — abstract paintings that computers interpret into music, as with scrolls fed to a player piano. And lately they’re planning an outdoor walkway of color-lit, pressure-sensitive John Conway-esque tiles that react and evolve according to foot traffic. These and Lotto’s other conjurings are slowly, charmingly bending the science of perception — and our perceptions of what science can be.

Lotto teaches at University College London.

“All his work attempts to understand the visual brain as a system defined, not by its essential properties, but by its past ecological interactions with the world. In this view, the brain evolved to see what proved useful to see, to continually redefine normality.”

British Science Association

Ok, the video is more than five minutes, but it is an investment in intelligence. Check it out:

Make sure to check out some of TED’s other lectures (well worth the time), and definitely check out Beau’s laboratory, Lotto Lab.