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Random High End Systems Lighting Demo Porn. WHAT ELSE are You Doing?!

Ha haa, yes, it’s time again for another installment of Random Lighting Porn, and for you fellow Parliament Funkadelic fans out there, “brought to you by the makers of Mr. Prolong – better known as Urge Overkill.”

(The pimping of the Pleasure Principle…)

I took a few of my best lighting students down to Austin at the beginning of the summer with the fantabulous but never nebulous Mr. Rick Hutton to see the factory and High End Systems HQ.  Taylor Knight, Jeremy Fisher, and Katherine Mitchell all got to meet Brad Schiller, Richard Belliveau, Craig Burross, and a lot of the rest of the team at HES, including one of my favorite teams, the developer team – always making that software work!

Here’s a video that I made from some clips of the demo Brad gave us, and some images of the trip in Gallery format.  Enjoy!

Random High End Systems Lighting Porn – WHAT ELSE Have You Got to Do? from Jim Hutchison on Vimeo.

Horrifying Statistics About Our United States Classroom Experiences

This is barely lighting related, but in my current state of mind, I had to share this with you.  Please join me in making this horrifying group of statistics go away.  Does it surprise you that American students rank among the lowest in the world?

This makes me want to f%$#ing puke.  If you imagine this is the case for general education, can you imagine what these stats must be for lighting education?  Holy crap.

Ugh.  Make it better.

STUDENTS. I’m Giving Away $500 for Books. You Just Have to Make A Video.

Lighting Students, listen up.

I posted the competition rules a while ago for the contest that I am holding for a FIVE HUNDRED DOLLAR PRIZE for books and supplies (which, hey, kinda rhymes!) and the cutoff time is MIDNIGHT TONIGHT.  So far, we have two entries.  TWO.

Does no one want $500 free dollars for books? I gotta believe that this ain’t true.

The two entries that are currently in the running for $500 for books and supplies – Daphne Mir, whom we all know affectionately as @lekogirl, and Zac Weigand’s video.  Zack and Daphne are both lighting design students.  Check out Daphne‘s first:

and Zack Weigand‘s video:

The original contest video and rules:

JimOnLight.com’s Fall 2010 Student Book Money Contest from Jim Hutchison on Vimeo.

The JimOnLight.com Fall 2010 Student Contest RULES:

  1. Make a video telling the world how you feel about the best thing ever – LIGHT!
  2. Upload the video somewhere like Youtube, Vimeo, Viddler, or somewhere else public before September 15, 2010 at midnight CST.
  3. Email Jim with the link to the video:  either jim AT jimonlight DOTCOM or jimonlight.com/contact

Guidelines:

  • There is no time limit or minimum on your video.  Make it as short or as long as you like.  Just make your case.
  • Please, no naked anything.  It doesn’t help your case, and if you make it public, you better believe people are going to see it.
  • Be nice.  The world would be so much more awesome if everyone was nice and treated each other how they’d love to be treated.
  • Light Associated Media LLC and JimOnLight.com cannot be held responsible for anything you do that upsets people.  I just want to help a student.  Don’t put me in a situation where I have to make defensive decisions.  By entering the contest with your video you agree not to act like a fool and do stupid things.
  • I make final decisions on who ultimately gets my $500.

JimOnLight.com Wants A Student in the World to Have $500 for Books

Books and supplies for lighting students are expensive.  Watch this video:

JimOnLight.com’s Fall 2010 Student Book Money Contest from Jim Hutchison on Vimeo.

The JimOnLight.com Fall 2010 Student Contest RULES:

  1. Make a video telling the world how you feel about the best thing ever – LIGHT!
  2. Upload the video somewhere like Youtube, Vimeo, Viddler, or somewhere else public before September 15, 2010 at midnight CST.
  3. Email Jim with the link to the video:  either jim AT jimonlight DOTCOM or jimonlight.com/contact

Guidelines:

  • There is no time limit or minimum on your video.  Make it as short or as long as you like.  Just make your case.
  • Please, no naked anything.  It doesn’t help your case, and if you make it public, you better believe people are going to see it.
  • Be nice.  The world would be so much more awesome if everyone was nice and treated each other how they’d love to be treated.
  • Light Associated Media LLC and JimOnLight.com cannot be held responsible for anything you do that upsets people.  I just want to help a student.  Don’t put me in a situation where I have to make defensive decisions.  By entering the contest with your video you agree not to act like a fool and do stupid things.
  • I make final decisions on who ultimately gets my $500.

Now go out there and make the best video about your love of light that you possibly can!

Richard Cadena Needs Our Help to Help Someone in Need

I am kicking myself in the face about this one, which is a very interesting sight (because I’m wearing my Teva sandals).  I scheduled this post at LightFair last week, but I did something that made it not post.  I am rectifying that right now.

I posted last week about Richard Cadena’s South African student friend Titus.  Ogunyemi “Titus” Oladimeji (the audio student at SAE in Capetown, South Africa), needs help with a laptop, and Richard is having a fundraiser to raise some money to buy him a used laptop.  Richard is trying to raise $1500 bucks for this project by May 28.  I’m reaching out to the JimOnLight.com Community – can you help?

Check out the widget below – anything is appreciated!

An Alternative to Production Photo Display

I have taught students how to format photos and put together portfolios of their work for several years, and one thing that has always gotten me about the way the industry views the work is the weird lack of creativity that comes with production photo exhibition.  You have your portfolio with your name, and all that stuff, your resume, some photos, and maybe some references.  Right?

I think that the advent of things like the iPad and web-based apps is changing the way that students will be able to display their portfolios.  You also have to understand that there will always be those sticklers who will literally just toss out portfolios that come on DVDs, CDs, or other media just because they don’t follow “the standard.”  I’m here right now to call BS on “the standard.”

I got bored this weekend (which is amazing with the amount of work on my plate right now) and I wanted to write about this very subject, so I put together this quick little minute-plus video of some Alive Lighting production shots in a little video.  I just tried to show an alternative method of displaying the work.  Quite frankly, I want to see someone show some creativity when displaying their work – remember, the production photos don’t talk.  If you can do anything to help enhance the display of the work, you’re doing yourself a favor.

Just remember – and this is important – do not alter your work in Photoshop!  Don’t change colors, adjust intensities, or generally alter the capture of the work.  None of these photos were altered beyond size adjustments.  That’s just not cool!  If you didn’t light it right the first time, don’t lie!  All you have to do is get caught doing that once, and you’re done.

Check out this quick little video – I did block out the logo of the client in this video to meet non-disclosure:

Production Photos Don’t Have To Be Just Photos! from Jim Hutchison on Vimeo.

What? Unpaid Internships Could Be Illegal? Ya Think?

I just read an awesome article at the New York Times about unpaid internships, and how it’s looking like this kind of thing is illegal.  The first time I read the headline, I thought to myself:

“Self, well DUH unpaid internships should be illegal.  Free work for “credit?”  Come on.  I may have been born at night, but it wasn’t LAST night.”

Then I read the article and saw that the unpaid internship positions that exist in the USA are being investigated.  I think that this is a good thing.

I have disagreed with colleagues over the years for HOURS about this very thing – exchanging “credit” and “experience” for what can sometimes be a 23-hour-a-day slave labor experience, day in and day out.  I think that it is absolute horse hockey (that’s poop, kids) that this still goes on.  I know that there are unpaid internships in the lighting industries, which is why this is relevant JimOnLight.com material.  I also know that people get taken advantage of in these situations.  It doesn’t take a genius to figure this out.

From the article:

No one keeps official count of how many paid and unpaid internships there are, but Lance Choy, director of the Career Development Center at Stanford University, sees definitive evidence that the number of unpaid internships is mushrooming — fueled by employers’ desire to hold down costs and students’ eagerness to gain experience for their résumés. Employers posted 643 unpaid internships on Stanford’s job board this academic year, more than triple the 174 posted two years ago.

In 2008, the National Association of Colleges and Employers found that 83 percent of graduating students had held internships, up from 9 percent in 1992. This means hundreds of thousands of students hold internships each year; some experts estimate that one-fourth to one-half are unpaid.

Come on.  A quarter to a HALF of internships are unpaid?  I think that this has a lot to do with the things that people tell students that they need to do when they’re trying to get a degree.  It was no different for me when I was in school - I was told on several occasions that an unpaid internship helps you have a better chance of getting a job.  I’m here to call BS on this, people.  I wasn’t having that crap when I was in school – I looked for a summer gig to do in place of an internship for credit in undergrad, where an internship was a requirement for graduation in my program.  So instead of getting abused, I went out as a master electrician on an opera tour and learned something new every day, AND got enough money to buy myself food (and cigarettes at that time, bad bad habit).

More from the NYT article – notice that the examples noted are all entertainment industry internships:

In California, officials have issued guidance letters advising employers whether they are breaking the law, while Oregon regulators have unearthed numerous abuses.

“We’ve had cases where unpaid interns really were displacing workers and where they weren’t being supervised in an educational capacity,” said Bob Estabrook, spokesman for Oregon’s labor department. His department recently handled complaints involving two individuals at a solar panel company who received $3,350 in back pay after claiming that they were wrongly treated as unpaid interns.

Many students said they had held internships that involved noneducational menial work. To be sure, many internships involve some unskilled work, but when the jobs are mostly drudgery, regulators say, it is clearly illegal not to pay interns.

One Ivy League student said she spent an unpaid three-month internship at a magazine packaging and shipping 20 or 40 apparel samples a day back to fashion houses that had provided them for photo shoots.

At Little Airplane, a Manhattan children’s film company, an N.Y.U. student who hoped to work in animation during her unpaid internship said she was instead assigned to the facilities department and ordered to wipe the door handles each day to minimize the spread of swine flu.

People, you have to use your brains nowadays.  Try your hardest not to let people take advantage of you just because you’re a student.  It’s true, sometimes internships pay, and a LOT of time an internship is something that you’ll get to learn a ton while you’re doing it – if the organization providing the internship has their stuff together to make sure you’re being taught.  Also, you can plan on doing some scut work while you’re an internship, this is totally true.  In the lighting industries, for example, if you’re working in entertainment lighting doing an internship, you could expect, for example, to be hosing the body fluids and mud off of feeder cable coming back into the shop from an outdoor music festival.  We’ve all been there.  You do it and you learn about that skill.  You might also get to run a Hog or a grandMA or something else cool during your internship.

Just remember, you gotta take care of yourself too.  So if you decide to take an unpaid internship for whatever reason, research it.  Then research it again, and again, and then sleep, and do it one more time.  Make sure that your time is worth what you’ll be getting.

Check out the NYT article here – great read.  Read both pages, the whole article is a bit shocking.  Also, thanks to withmyba.com for the hilarious image!

ATTENTION LIGHTING STUDENTS: WYSIWYG Now Has A Student “Perform” Version

random-wysiwyg-jimonlight

I had a great conversation with Gil Densham from Cast Lighting yesterday.  We’ve been talking about the upcoming release of WYSIWYG R25 and some of the new features that will be implemented in R25, as well as all kinds of developments that the Black Box system is having.  Gil also informed me about a new Cast Software offering – a limited time WYSIWYG student version.  Normally the student versions of software are fairly limited, whether it is in features or a big watermark somewhere on the drawing or something equally as pervasive.  However, the student versions usually have a reduced price tag too, so the balance finds its way in there somehow.

The student pricing, also called Cast’s “Perform SSE,” is a full version of the Perform suite with visualization.  You will get a dongle which is your property – the dongle will come authorized for the student version of the suite, which includes everything but tech support and updates.  What I understand the details to be is as follows:

  • it’s the full version of Perform.  Viz, console connectivity, the works.
  • the student WYSIWYG suite is $499
  • the $499 that you pay as a student is fully applicable to a full version when you’ve graduated – essentially you’re getting the program for nothing if you plan on upgrading at the end of school.
  • you get a dongle that you can travel with, and you’re not limited to using a student version in the computer lab.
  • you do have to prove that you’re a student currently enrolled and taking classes.
  • It’s essentially a full version of R22, which has all of the great viz and beam stuff.
  • the student WYSIWYG will have a 1000 channel limit.

I love my WYSIWYG.  After my eyes, it is my number one lighting design tool.  If you’re a student, and you want to get in on this, email [email protected] and give them the hey-what’s-up.  If you ever have questions about WYSIWYG, please don’t hesitate to contact me through the JimOnLight contact form, just put WYSIWYG somewhere in the subject.

Cast also has some cool student pricing on a specially packaged student version of WYSIWYG Design, and their Event Planning and conceptual design package, Vivien.  I haven’t ever talked about Vivien much, but it is a cool product.  I’ll talk a bit more about this in the near future, but for $199 and a $30 “initiation fee” you get one year of the software as long as you’re a student.  The cool part of that money is that if you were to buy four years at $199 a year, at your graduation they will credit you every dime of that money towards upgrading to the full version.

You’re going to use a lot of software in your lives to design lighting – some of it is cool, some of it is a waste of your time.  WYSIWYG has taught me more, saved me more time, and saved my rear end more times than I can count.  That’s why I write these posts.

Have a great weekend, everyone!