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The NIN/JA Tour and the Chamsis MagicQ

chamsis magicq

I just got a press release from PRG about the latest Nine Inch Nails and Jane’s Addiction tour – yes, they’re calling it the NIN/JA tour. Roy Bennet and Jason Bullock have decided to give the Chamsis MagicQ lighting console a go on the show – this is a console that I haven’t had a chance to get my hands on quite yet, but every single person who has had their hands on it says it’s fantastic. Check out the press release below, and check out the Chamsis products here.

ChamSys MagicQ takes control of the Nine Inch Nails and Jane’s Addiction summer tour

Las Vegas, NV—July 30, 2009—For the current Nine Inch Nails and Jane’s Addiction tour, NIN|JA Summer Tour 2009, lighting designer Roy Bennet and co-designer Jason Bullock, who is also the lighting director/programmer, chose the increasingly popular ChamSys MagicQ console.

“Both shows were originally written on a single desk,” said Bullock. “It was around 900 cue stacks before they were separated.” Bullock had used other consoles on previous NIN tours but this was his first experience with the ChamSys. “I’d been looking for a new console that could combine the attributes of other desks. After some investigating, the ChamSys looked the most promising. I downloaded the offline version and got a general feel for syntax. The intuitive way the syntax is constructed made me confident that this was a risk I felt comfortable taking.”

PRG Distribution North America sold the two ChamSys MagicQ+300 consoles and wings to Upstaging, Inc., who provided the lighting for the tour. “When I opened the road case at the shop and actually was able to map out all of the things that I had created in the MagicQ offline editor, I knew that I had made a good decision,” commented Bullock. “Within an hour I had built new fixture profiles, patched the desk and begun to build palettes. For a system with 1,850 different heads, that was impressive.”

The MagicQ console continues to find favor with Bullock. “I still find new things I like about this desk everyday. Just a few of my favorites include Live Timing when using the programmer; Live FX manipulation, I can’t state how great this feature is, you are able to tweak all functions of FX during show without entering into edit mode. Plus the familiar cue structure let’s you walk up to this desk and immediately begin to work in a style you are accustomed to.”

For Bullock the pixel mapper in the MagicQ is one of its key features. “This console is a generation ahead of all the others in dealing with the growing amount of media that lighting is now controlling. This includes media servers and large configurations of LED fixtures. I really like the fact that the desk can create an entire media server-type control interface for any fixture in the system, while still retaining the light as a light. The two don’t interfere.”

Chuck Spector, tour support for Upstaging, believes the ChamSys is an ideal touring console, especially for Bullock. “Jason is very cue intensive; he puts a lot of information into the desks,” Spector said. “Also, his style often puts a lot of wear and tear on a desk because of the way he programs. He runs through so many cues—that for a desk to keep up with the way he runs a show—it’s really put through its paces.”

Spector is pleased with the addition of the ChamSys consoles to the shop noting, “The product is pretty damn solid so far. And the support from PRG Distribution was great, particularly product specialist Esteban Caracciolo. It’s a pleasure to be doing business with people who understand the importance of supporting shows.”

For more information on PRG Distribution, please visit www.prgdistribution.com.

Series 400 Makes U2’s 360 Tour Work

I just got an email from Kirsten at PRG about their Series 400 data and power distro system, which is being used on the massive mondoginormous U2 360° Tour.  Check it out!

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PRG’s Series 400 System Powers U2’s 360° Tour

New Windsor, NY—July 20, 2009—The unprecedented scale of U2’s 360° Tour required a power and data network that would handle long distances; be quick and efficient to install; provide high network speed; and be rock-solid. Systems Crew Chief Craig Hancock worked with Show Director/Designer Willie Williams from the early design phase of the production to engineer a network that would satisfy all of these requirements.

The backbone of Hancock’s network design is the PRG Series 400™ Power and Data Distribution System. Describing his approach to laying out the system, Hancock said, “I started working on the lighting system and layout of the power and data network about seven months ago with Willie and Jeremy Lloyd and Nick Evans of Mark Fisher’s Studio Fisher. I then worked with PRG, especially Chris Conti, to get where we are now. I knew what I wanted and how I wanted it and Chris made it into reality with Series 400.”

“The networking system for the U2 360° tour is daunting when you first look at it, but it is actually fairly simple, just on a very large scale,” noted Conti, PRG’s S400 Product Manager. “There is an S400 trunk cable run to the FOH control position, providing the power for the consoles as well as running the DMX from the consoles to the S400 system. Then fiber optic cable distributes the data around the system, a total of eight 350’ runs.” There are a total of 24 universes of DMX with custom dimmer carts at the bottom of each leg of the structure. There are a total of four carts up on the catwalk in the roof structure that handle the power and data for the lights in the roof as well as in the pylon (the central vertical element of the set). DMX is sent from the top of the pylon out to the seven satellite lighting positions that are in the seats around the top of the stadium.

Hancock, who had previously used the S400 system on Madonna’s Sticky and Sweet tour, knew the abilities of the system. “The great thing about having the PRG Node Plusses and the S400 Fiber Switches is that they all work in line with the Series 400 system; it allows so much flexibility. I can use external equipment like dimmer racks and other gear with no headaches at all.” Cue reaction time was also critical to Williams and Hancock. “With the sheer scale of the structure and having the satellite lighting positions around the stadium, we were very concerned about the network speed and the reaction time. The Series 400 system moves Art-Net around which allowed us to have no delays in cue reaction time,” Hancock said.

The final piece of the system was the inclusion of City Theatrical’s SHoW DMX wireless DMX explained Hancock, “When Chris came onboard in March it was invaluable because he brought in the SHoW DMX. I think that the wireless DMX solved a big issue and has worked well. I didn’t really see how we were going to run cabling through the crowd every night.” For Hancock the final network system has overall ease of use and is reliable. It is what he wanted, a power and data network that is the backbone of the lighting system for Williams’ sophisticated design.

For more information on PRG, please visit www.prg.com.

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PRG’s Bad Boy Is Hitting the Road with U2

u2 bad boy prg

Willie Williams is going to be rocking a hundred and ninety six of PRG’s Bad Boy fixture!  I just got a press release from Anne over at PRG – check it out!

Media Contact:
Anne Johnston
845-567-5871
ajohnston@prg.com
PRG’s Bad Boy surrounds U2

New Windsor, NY—July 10, 2009—Immediately upon entering the venue, audiences attending U2’s 360° Tour will realize that they are about to experience a truly unique event. “The goal always for me is when the fans come into the stadium they see something the like of which they have never seen before,” explained Willie Williams, Show Designer & Director. Working closely with Architect Mark Fisher and Production Director Jake Berry, Williams has realized that goal and created a structure that is the largest ever designed for a concert tour. The sheer size of the set created a challenge, in that the fixture positions were a significant distance from the stage. So, Williams turned to the PRG Bad Boy™.

“The throw distances that we are dealing with are much longer then you would normally ever deal with for all the lighting positions, never mind the lights around the stadium,” said Williams. “Even the closest lights to the stage are an 80-foot throw and the ones on the legs are nearer a 100-foot throw. There is no way you could use old school moving lights, plus I needed a light that would not just reach and wash but would be able to have texture.”

In December, PRG arranged a fixture demonstration at Wembley Stadium so that Williams could evaluate the Bad Boy and other lights in a real world environment. “What I found interesting about the light is that PRG started with the application in their fixture design, which was to create a light for large scale shows, arenas, stadiums,” said Williams. “That has been their master stroke, to start with what the light is intended to do and really work towards that particular goal. When you are at the back of Wembley Stadium, you need a light with the gas to get to the stage.”

Williams decided to use the Bad Boy as his only automated light for illumination, with his final design calling for 196 fixtures. The Bad Boy easily handles distances from 80-feet to 400-feet. It was a bold choice to base an entire design around only the Bad Boy and Williams had to wait until the lighting system was powered up for the first time at the Barcelona rehearsal venue to know for certain that his idea would work. “Even when I got here, we still had a few days before the system was turned on where I was biding my time. I was a little antsy waiting to see what these things would do under show conditions. I think it is fair to say they are absolutely remarkable.”

Lighting Director Ethan Weber understood Williams’ initial concern. “There is nothing else—spot, wash lights—everything you do is with the Bad Boy and coming into rehearsals it was a light none of us had ever used before,” said Weber. “When we turned them on it was pretty obvious it was the right way to go. We have all been very impressed. Many of the fixtures are a few hundred feet from the stage and not only are they very bright but their zoom allow us to go from pinspotting the band to lighting a stadium audience with relatively few fixtures. I don’t know of any other light that can do this. So far they’ve been very reliable—impressive, considering we’ve had them on for long hours in the Barcelona sun.”

Williams’ lighting design is fairly straightforward, considering the complexity of the overall production design. While Weber handles all the automated fixtures, lighting associate Alex Murphy calls all the followspot cues for the 25 spots, and controls the LEDs in the set with the PRG Mbox™ Extreme Media Server. PRG’s Concert Touring group supplied the entire lighting package for the tour, which also included the PRG Series 400™ Power and Data Distribution System. The S400 combines power, DMX and Ethernet data through a single custom-designed trunk cable. The data system includes Ethernet switches with the ability to route any DMX universe to any DMX output connector in the system, along with complete electrical isolation. As a result, lighting systems can better accommodate the growing need for data and use less cable and technicians can re-route signals from the user menus without making physical changes to the system.

The power and data system for the U2 Tour was designed by System Crew Chief Craig Hancock, who worked closely with Jeremy Lloyd and Nick Evans of Fisher’s Stufish studio integrating the lighting system into the actual structural system. Chris Conti, PRG product manager, also worked closely with Hancock on the layout. Conti explained, “All together we have a total of 24 universes of DMX. We have S400 racks at the bottom of each leg of the structure, which are in custom dimmer carts that Craig designed. They also contain S400 main breaker racks, dimmer and relay racks, strobe distribution racks, communications, etc. There are two carts of S400 and two dimmer carts up on catwalks in the roof structure that handle the power and data for the pylon.”

That balance between complexity and simplicity is the key to Williams’ sophisticated designs success. To maintain that balance, everyone needed to be on the same page, working towards the same result. Tim Murch, PRG account executive, noted, “They really have brought together wonderfully qualified people, starting with the incredible Jake Berry and of course Willie and Mark. It is incredibly well organized; thanks in large part to them. It is a very heads up situation with coordination between every single department.”

Williams is very pleased with PRGs efforts on behalf of the tour. “At the end of the day it is about people and if you don’t have the right people it is just not going to happen,” he stated. “I am absolutely delighted. They have been really good. Both Tim Murch and Robin Wain (PRG account executive) have been fantastic. You can’t do this by second guessing; I just have to have complete faith that people are doing what they are supposed to be doing. You really have to trust.”

For more information on PRG, please visit www.prg.com.

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I’m Sorry to Hear About Michael Jackson, Patrick Woodroffe and Crew

Yes, Michael Jackson passed away this last week.  The CNN gang refused to let us know about that little fact (I’m a CNN watcher, it’s true) and by day three I was pretty sure that Michael Jackson had still departed this Earth.

What no one is talking about, however, is the fact that in addition to the rental costs that the supply companies (PRG) are going to lose, the MJ crew and designers are now out of work.  Don’t get me wrong, they’re all seasoned professionals, and I bet they will still all have work.  What I am most bummed about is that now we don’t get to see the wonderment, high production and design values, and overall art that the team had almost created.  Unless the “King of Pop” is planning a publicity stunt and we’re all about to be totally duped, these folks are out of a gig – and we all miss out on the excellent work, reviews, trade publications, and other cool stuff that happens when a huge show hits the papers.  Patrick Woodroffe, I was looking forward to reviewing your work.  I’ll just catch the next one.

I really hope that the networks at least spend 15 seconds talking about the production.  From what I am hearing, it was huge, and pretty beautiful.  I’m sorry to Michael Jackson’s family, friends, and fans about his passing, as it blows to lose a friend – but I’m also sorry that the people who make him look and sound so good are now out of work.  I hope you folks all find new work, and in short order.

BAD BOY Goes Out With CMT Music Awards

I just got a press release from Anne over at PRG about the Country Music Television Music Awards show, and Allen Branton’s lighting design for the show – using my current favorite fixture, the BAD BOY from PRG.  Check out the press release:

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PRG’s Bad Boy goes country on the CMT Music Awards

New Windsor, NY-June 29, 2009-When viewers tuned into this year’s CMT Music Awards, televised live on June 16th from the Sommet Center in Nashville, they were treated to more than thank you speeches and some of the hottest acts in country music. Production Designer Anne Brahic and Lighting Designer Allen Branton, whose team also handled the video content, provided a video and lighting driven alternative to traditional scenery while embracing the idea of negative space. Branton turned to the PRG Bad BoyTM luminaire for strong beam effects and to delineate the performers in this unique visual environment.

Branton had previously used the Bad Boys in his design for the MTV Movie Awards. There they played the role of Hollywood searchlights on the glamorous film-inspired set. “The Bad Boys worked really nicely on the MTV awards because of their smaller size but great intensity,” said Branton. “We used five of them on the floor to emulate movie premiere searchlights. They needed to be in scale with the set and there aren’t many smaller lights that have enough intensity to do that job.”

For the CMT Music Awards, Branton worked closely with Brahic on the ‘no set’ design consisting of video tile ribbons and a visual forest of Versa® Tubes floating in dark space. “We really tried to place the lights in a very surgical, restrained manner so as not to have the lighting and the video elements in competition with each other,” noted Branton. “The Bad Boys were a great tool because they had enough brightness to compete with the video even in vivid colors. We only needed three fixtures as backlight to define the performers against the video background.”

Felix Peralta, Lighting Director/Programmer for the CMT awards, agreed, saying, “They provided a big, hard-edge light that could cut through the video. Allen and I really like the 8″ aperture of the Bad Boy, it is a nice fat beam that comes out of the light; the output is tremendous. It really provides what Allen likes to call the ‘shock and awe’.”

PRG also provided the large quantity of VersaTubes, a primary feature of the design, along with five Mbox ExtremeTM media servers, which were programmed by Jason Rudolph. Rudolph used two servers for the Versa Tubes and three for the XL Video F-LED video tiles. “I have used the Mbox many times in the past and there are a lot of things I like about it,” said Rudolph. “The new version 3 hardware is a vast improvement. It is a good server with a lot of nice functions and it is pretty damn reliable.”

Branton, who worked closely with PRG well in advance of the event commented, “Everything came in and was ready to go, which was great because our time was limited. Everything was handled beautifully. It is really one of the most important things to me, getting people in the boat with you that you can trust and I trust PRG.”

PRG’s Bad Boy is Rocking Eurovision

Joan Lyman Melzig

I just got a press release from PRG – Bad Boy is rocking the crap out of the Eurovision Song Contest 2009.  Check out the press release:

PRG Bad BoyTM boasts biggest show to date on Eurovision Song Contest 2009

New Windsor, New York – May 16, 2009 – The annual Eurovision Song Contest, now in its 54th year, is one of the most-watched television productions in the world, with estimates of some 200 million viewers. The format began simply enough back in 1954 – a live broadcast of the members of the European Broadcast Union competing to win the title of Best Song in Europe, with the winner bestowed the honor of hosting the contest the next year in their home country. The production has since reached astounding proportions, now with 42 countries competing in three live broadcasts – two Semi-Finals and one Final.

When Russia won Eurovision in Belgrade, Serbia last year, Russian show producers were immediately driven to make the 2009 production in Moscow the biggest and most breathtaking in Eurovision history. The live broadcasts for the Semi-Finals were held on May 12 and 14 and the Finals on May 16, with viewer numbers skyrocketing to new heights, thanks to a live feed online via www.eurovision.tv.

The equipment list is impressive to say the least, with an astounding 2,000 square meters of LED, but the real talk of the show has been the 72 PRG Bad BoyTM luminaires. Since the fixture hit the shelves at the beginning of this year, it has been seen on major tours from Oasis to Britney Spears and on television productions such as the Grammy Awards and The Celebrity Apprentice.

The fixtures are installed around the entire rig and positioned directly over the stage. Rich Gorrod, lighting gaffer, who has been on-site in Moscow since March 31 said, “They’re absolutely spectacular. They’re bright as hell, giving the Syncrolites a run for their money, with lightning snap color and gobo change. Plus the zoom is unbelievable, from pencil beam to super wide, and most of all they’re incredibly reliable. They’ve been running 18 hours a day for the last four weeks – which says a lot for such a new light. They just do everything that it says on the tin – fantastically well. We’ve brought two techs to Moscow just for the Bad Boys and they’ve been bored to tears!”

Lighting Designer Al Gurdon (MTV Europe Awards, Robbie Williams) is equally as pleased, citing, “They’re simply a dream come true. We have loads of LED, and these still stand out with no problem whatsoever. They look amazing on camera and deliver these vibrant, saturated colors that I want with incredibly smooth and fast precision. A show of this magnitude demands quite a lot from its equipment, and the Bad Boy has proven itself to be a champion.”

The Bad Boy is a hybrid luminaire that combines the qualities of a traditional automated fixture light with a large-venue fixture.  “It was one of the first things specified for this production,” said Eruovision Production Manager Ola Melzig.  “I first saw it at PLASA last year, and I could immediately tell that it was designed with today’s shows, which often involve high-brightness LED screens, in mind.”

The Bad Boy is definitely standing out on the Eurovision stage, with a powerful 48,000 lumens.  Its high definition optics work perfectly for television – yet another reason they were specified.  In addition to the optical clarity that comes with using high-quality lenses, the Bad Boy features also include smooth, fluid control of focus, zoom range of 8:1 (7° to 56°), and imaging thanks to high-speed servo motors and full-field 0 to 100% dimming.  The Quantum Color® system utilizes individual color filters providing variation in both saturation and hue, resulting in a much broader and vibrant range of saturated colors.  Plus, the Bad Boy was designed with energy efficiency and carbon footprint standards in mind.

“We at PRG are very pleased to play a supporting role for the Eurovision Song Contest,” says Anne Johnston, Vice President of Marketing for PRG.   “It is exciting to see this many Bad Boys on such a grand stage with a worldwide audience. We were thrilled to see the Bad Boy was enjoying so many rave reviews from the hard working crew and designers. The production is a massive undertaking and we are proud to play a role.”

For more information on PRG, please visit www.prg.com.

Oh, isn’t it beautiful?  BASQUE IN IT!


Gekko’s Keddo LED Fixture Wins at NAB 2009

prg_gekko_kedo_1hr

Have you seen the Gekko LED fixtures?  They’re primarily marketed towards stage and screen, but they’re pretty awesome – they have self-monitoring to make sure that the illumination level coming from them is consistent.  That’s my favorite thing about them – they’re also pretty brilliant in their saturated colors.  PRG has exclusive distribution rights for their stuff, and the keddo fixture just won  two big awards at NAB this year.  The press release is below, please check it out.

Gekko kedoTM Wins Two Awards at NAB 2009

New Windsor, New York-May 4, 2009-Production Resource Group, LLC (PRG), the exclusive rental and sales distributor for Gekko Technology Ltd. products in North America, is pleased to announce that the Gekko kedoTM won two awards at the recent 2009 NAB tradeshow in Las Vegas. The just-launched Gekko kedo, a focusable luminaire powered by an LED source, won two awards-the DV magazine 2009 Black Diamond Award and TV Technology magazine’s Mario Award for Innovation. The Black Diamond Award recognizes the best products making their debut at the NAB show, specifically those that will appeal to video professionals. A select panel of engineers and editors, as well as production and post professionals joined the DV magazine staff to judge the Black Diamond Awards. The Mario Awards, named after Mario Orazio, a pseudonym for a nameless engineer who pens the industry’s most widely read technology column The Masked Engineer, in TV Technology, were established to recognize products that represent significant technical breakthroughs and companies that demonstrate forward thinking and technical excellence in their products. Both DV magazine and TV Technology are a part of NewBay Media’s Broadcast & Video Group of products.

“At NAB this year, PRG again enjoyed introducing new technology to the industry,” comments Brian Edwards, General Manager of PRG’s Los Angeles depot. “The enthusiastic response was terrific. As always, we work very hard to supply the film and broadcast industries with the tools and services that will help support their creative efforts. It is always particularly gratifying to get the opportunity to introduce products like the Gekko kedo or the Nila Lighting System and see them so immediately embraced. I think it is evidence that PRG continuously works to source new technology with a true understanding of these industries.”

In addition to the kedo, UK-based Gekko Technology also manufactures kisslite, lenslite, kicklite and george. The new kedo is a focusable spotlight equivalent in output to a 1kW Fresnel that is powered by Gekko’s kleer colourTM light engine. Kleer colour is the world’s first adjustable, focusable single source multi-color light engine. It uses a single-array of high-power LED that can be tuned under software control to produce a wide array of different color temperatures and colors. The LED array can be tuned locally or remotely via DMX. The kedo can produce an extensive range of different colors and a range of high quality whites allowing it to match any color required to illuminate a specific scene. In addition to primary and intermediate colors, kedo can precisely emulate a high quality tungsten reference source. It can be switched quickly and easily to produce 2,900K, 3,200K, 4,300K, 5,600K and 6,500K as well as a wide range of virtual color filters, all of which remain stable throughout dimming.

“The kleer colour light engine represents something of a ‘Holy Grail’ in the lighting world,” explains Gekko Technology’s founder and Managing Director David Amphlett. “Designed specifically for the needs of image capture, it gives lighting directors and camera crews unprecedented control of color temperature and illumination level. Unlike multi-source RGB color-mixing devices, kleer colour delivers a broad spectrum of light that can be adjusted by the operator to match a vast array of hues across the visible range. Self-monitoring sensors ensure stable color across a range of output levels as well as correcting changes in performance caused by ambient temperature and component ageing. In addition to its unsurpassed creative versatility, the kleer colour engine delivers far higher color rendering than any other lighting technology powered by discontinuous sources, across all operating temperatures and illumination levels.” The kleer colour system provides consistent color quality from lamp to lamp, with tight calibration and sophisticated closed loop feedback.

PRG has represented the Gekko Technology products-including kisslite, lenslite, kicklite and george-since February 2009 and has been very encouraged by the industry’s enthusiastic response. Gekko film credits include Casino Royale, Quantum of Solace, Death Defying Acts, Mama Mia, The Golden Compass and television dramas including Waking the Dead, New Tricks and The Commander. The kedo will no doubt be in great demand with cinematographers and lighting directors for their toolboxes.

For more information on the award-winning Gekko Technology kedo as well as the whole Gekko product line, please visit http://www.prg.com/market/tv-film/gekko-technology-ltd.

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Bad Boy Debuts with Oasis

YEAH!  I wrote about PRG’s Bad Boy a few weeks before I saw it at LDI, but when I laid hands on it, I was hooked.  Bad Boy is bad ass.  I normally keep lowball swearing out of my blog, but I thought that was appropriate.

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Oasis Debuts Bad Boy to the World

New Windsor, New York-April 23, 2009- Production Resource Group, LLC, (PRG) celebrated the debut of its Bad BoyTM luminaire on the recently completed first leg of the Oasis Dig Out Your Soul tour. Of his fixture choice, lighting designer Rob Gawler said, “The Bad Boy was just what I had been looking for-a big bright large-format luminaire, that could be used as a narrow washlight with a couple of gobos as a bonus.”

From a Roman amphitheatre in Vienne near Lyon, France to stadiums in South America, with sold-out dates throughout Asia, Mexico, Western Europe, the US and the UK, Oasis has been literally touring the world with production support from PRG’s Concert Touring group. Oasis’ Dig Out Your Soul tour marks the largest tour the band has ever embarked on with stops in several countries for the first time, including dates in Lima, Peru and Taipei City, Taiwan. Gawler turned to PRG’s Concert Touring group knowing it could effectively handle the global aspect of the support as well as the wide range of venue types.

Providing 48,000 lumens with precision speed and control over color and gobo changing as well as spot to flood zoom and full-field dimming, the PRG Bad Boy was exactly the unit Gawler wanted. “The units worked great ‘out of the case’ and I was pleasantly surprised at how many different beam looks I could really get out of the unit. I was initially a bit unsure about the fixed color mixing but it is working out fine, in fact it is nice to see all eight lamps the same color rather than the three or four hues that you get with some of the ‘true’ color mixers.”

In addition to the accurately matched colors, several of the Bad Boy’s other features, including optical clarity and smooth fluid control of focus, zoom, dimming and imaging-thanks to high quality lenses and high-speed servo motors-have been ideal for Gawler’s Oasis design. “I wanted a design that would fit into a number of different venue formats and scale between them well, without compromising the overall look. I knew I wanted to use a selection of contemporary fixtures but to create a look that is reminiscent of a more progressive, psychedelic period.”

Gawler also points out, “I like that it’s relatively simple to hang and once it’s up there it is going to work. I especially like being able to zoom it down to an almost parallel intense spot beam, or when I drop a gobo in and zoom it out, it just keeps going, until you have a sharp image covering a surprisingly large area of stage, cyc, or even the back of the house. It may seem a bit big in the road case but the power consumption is reasonable.  And the status display on the fixture is intuitive to use, as well as informative. While the units we have out on Oasis have proven very reliable, it is clear that maintenance has been carefully considered.”

Gawler is enjoying the tour and working on the next leg. “The challenge is to put on a consistently good show, without being dependent on rigging capacity, load-in time and specific production elements. It has been an exciting design challenge and PRG’s Concert Touring group has been fantastic to work with-they have provided good kit, fantastic crew and great support.”

For more information on PRG, please visit www.prg.com.

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i-Pix BB-4 at the Brits

The i-Pix BB-4 is getting a lot of play lately – this time, at the Brit Awards at Earl’s Court.

Lighting designer Al Gurdon and programmer Ross WIlliams used 24 of the BB-4 wash units (they’re 4-lites) on custom brackets that allowed two of the units to be hung together, according to Lighting and Sound America.  Al and his crew used these for typical audience abuser-type effects in the Earls Court.

From the article:

“They are absolutely super-bright,” comments lighting supplier PRG’s crew chief Richard Gorrod, adding that they are far brighter than a conventional eight-lite and the tech time involved with BB4s is considerably less than with Molefays and scrollers.

Read the original article here at Lighting and Sound America.