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The Switch LED A-Lamp – Definitely the Most Unique LED A-Lamp I’ve Seen!

You know, for the most part, I’ve been pretty unimpressed with the designs of the A-lamp “replacement” LED lamps.  I’m not shooting my mouth off saying I have a much better design, but there is something about that diffused white globe atop the heat sink, which looks like a handful of fins.  I actually kinda like the heat sink design, the fins are neat.  If you’ve held one of those suckers when it’s been on for a while, that heat sink is HOT!  Not Jennifer Lopez hot, we’re talking George Bush’s ears while telling the nation that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction hot.  That is HOT!

I just turned onto a new design for the LED A-lamp from a company called the Switch Bulb Company – they are promoting an LED replacement A-lamp with a high CRI, a warm feel, and a pretty decent output.  The difference?  A lens-type “ball” atop the heat sink that shows each element and the heat dissipation gear inside.  It’s actually quite a beautiful design!  Check it out:

Pretty interesting design, huh!  Switch is offering three models right now – the Switch40, Switch60 (PDF spec link), and Switch75 (PDF spec link).  As you can probably guess, these 40, 60, 75 ratings are the replacement quantity of light per power consumption hint-hint to sell the “incandescent replacement” idea.  The Switch40 doesn’t have specifications online yet, but the Switch60 claims 830 lumens at 13 watts, and the Switch75 claims 1150 lumens at 16 watts.  Pretty decent!  That 830 lumens figure is pretty close to an 850 lumen incandescent at 60 watts in terms of efficacy – if you look at an 850 lumen 60W incandescent, the efficacy is about 14.2 lm/W, but the Switch lamp is putting out nearly the same output at 13W, giving a near 64% efficacy!

Switch is showing two general colors – a “warm” at around 2750 Kelvin, and a “Neutral” colored lamp, more than likely a bit higher in color temperature. I’ve requested to get my hands on one of these, let’s see if that happens or not!  I would love to see one up close!

Check out this quick little video:

Cree’s LMR-4 Modular LED

I have been so busy and accumulated so much content lately that I find myself playing catch up with some pretty great footage and images!

One such bunch of stuff is from LightFair 2010 in Las Vegas.  Tom Roberts gave me a pretty great introduction to Cree’s LMR-4 modular LED product.  I finally got the video cut together – check it out!  What a cool product!

And an update – Ginny from Cree made the following video about the LMR-4, which I recommend watching!

Luxim’s Light Emitting Plasma + A Hydrogen Fuel Cell = Win

More news out of our favorite high output lamp technology from Luxim – a hydrogen fuel cell paired with Luxim’s Light-Emitting Plasma technology made its appearance at a celebrity gathering lately, debuting the first mobile fuel cell powered entertainment lighting application.

Check out the press release:

FUEL CELL-POWERED MOBILE LIGHTING SYSTEM FEATURING LUXIM’S LIGHT EMITTING PLASMA TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYED AT ACADEMY AWARDS®

SUNNYVALE, Calif., Mar. 23, 2010—At the Academy Awards® ceremony held earlier this month, a new mobile lighting system incorporating Light Emitting Plasma™ (LEP) from LUXIM and a clean hydrogen fuel cell was deployed at the celebrity gathering, infusing the festivities with a brighter, cleaner sparkle.  The novel mobile unit was recently developed by a team of collaborators as a more efficient alternative to traditional technologies powered by diesel fuel generators.  In addition to LUXIM, the team consisted of Sandia National LaboratoriesThe Boeing Company, the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), Altergy SystemsMultiquip Inc., and others.

The use of the new system marks a major departure for this kind of high-intensity entertainment lighting application.  Up to now, mobile lighting units were powered by diesel fuel generators that produce carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides and soot, making them less than ideal for the environment.  Before this technology arrived, mobile lighting units typically consumed 4.4 kilowatts.  The LEP system consumes only about 2.3 kilowatts for the same light output, a reduced power requirement that saves energy and increases the system duration (operational time between refills).

Said Geoff Browne, LUXIM’s Vice President of Sales, “It’s a thrill to see our technology deployed at such a high-profile venue.  The fuel cell mobile system featuring LEP is an especially good fit for the entertainment industry.  It meets film production sound levels, maintains zero exhaust emissions and can be used for indoor and outdoor film shoots.  But beyond the novelty of deployment at a highly visible Hollywood entertainment event, LEP is gaining steady adoption in multiple other important commercial venues like street and area, and general lighting.   It’s simply the most powerful, efficient and cleanest light source for new-generation high-intensity applications.”

LUXIM is the world leader in Light Emitting Plasma technology, having shipped more than 50,000 products under its LiFi™ brand.  These products are used in applications as varied as projection display, medical instruments and entertainment lighting.  In each application the technology has brought dramatic improvements in efficiency, life and color quality.  LUXIM is now bringing the benefits of Light Emitting Plasma technology to the area lighting market with the goal of playing a meaningful role in reducing the planet’s energy consumption and abating climate change.

LIFI and LEP are trademarks of LUXIM.  Other names used in this press release are trademarks of the parties indicated.

To learn more about LUXIM and LiFi, please visit www.luxim.com.

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How High Output Lamps are Made

I hope you are enjoying these “How It’s Made” posts, because I am really enjoying searching for the information!

I found a video displaying how certain high output lamps are manufactured – what really surprised me is how much human interaction there is in the manufacturing process!  I thought this was something that would be fully automated.  Wrong again!

Start this video at around 1:30 unless you want to know how peanut butter is filled into jars and sealed.