Posts

Burgundy – A New .PSLAB Beiruit Lighting Design Project

My favorite Lebanese lighting design firm, .PSLAB out of Beirut, has just finished another interesting project – a wine bar/restaurant called Burgundy.  I just heard from my pal Ramsi at the firm this morning, and I am excited to share the project images!

From the .PSLAB press release:

A lighting project for a wine bar/restaurant having a substructure of wooden arched beams cutting through a wire mesh covering the ceiling. The setting of the space underneath the substructure is functionally divided into two sections: a bar area and a dining area.

Highlighting the dual function, the lighting objects are set on two parallel axes over these two sections.

Suspended from the arcs, each light object is a set of conical tubes conceived to fill a circular-shaped area. Clustering in the circle, the tubes start at the center; moving radially, they begin to deviate at an angle of 25 degrees to reach an angle of 45 degrees. This deviation renders a chandelier-like object, with a bottom curved outline opposite to that of the ceiling. The cluster of the tubes housing the bulbs creates an effect of a singular light source being filtered.

The entrance is lit by a set of black projectors also using the arched beams for fixation; the groove in the beams encloses the technical parts box, while the head of the projector is left loose to rotate shedding light in different directions.

A lighting project for a wine bar/restaurant having a substructure of wooden arched beams cutting through a wire mesh covering the ceiling.The setting of the space underneath the substructure is functionally divided into two sections: a bar area and a dining area.Highlighting the dual function, the lighting objects are set on two parallel axes over these two sections.Suspended from the arcs, each light object is a set of conical tubes conceived to fill a circular-shaped area. Clustering in the circle, the tubes start at the center; moving radially, they begin to deviate at an angle of 25 degrees to reach an angle of 45 degrees. This deviation renders a chandelier-like object, with a bottom curved outline opposite to that of the ceiling.

The cluster of the tubes housing the bulbs creates an effect of a singular light source being filtered.The entrance is lit by a set of black projectors also using the arched beams for fixation; the groove in the beams encloses the technical parts box, while the head of the projector is left loose to rotate shedding light in different directions.

Cool!  My other favorite type of lighting design is architectural and interior – so these kinds of projects always thrill me to write about whenever they come across the desk!

Check out some images – and make SURE to check out .PSLAB’s website!

Thanks, Ramsi!

SevenUp – Tim Baute’s Chandelier-Esque Fixture

Tim Baute‘s “SevenUp” fixture is a modern fixture with the form and structure of a grand chandelier.  The beauty and function of his fixture is quite striking, as the structure leaves nothing to the imagination.  Yatzer wrote an article about this fixture, and the text that they posted is great.  Yatzer, I hope it’s okay that I reposted this paragraph:

Tim Baute of INTERROR.BE is a Belgian designer and creator of the chandelier “SevenUp.”  Chandeliers have always been very romantic design pieces in every space…but according to Baute they’ve also been extremely massive!  I guess no one can actually disagree!  With this in mind Baute designed a chandelier which would keep the nostalgia, but give it a lighter touch.  In order to get rid of the bulkiness and the grandeur of this object, Baute used the deconstruction method and literally stuck to the essence of the chandelier.  He used the electricity cables as the central structure. When they bundle up, they form the central core that descends from the ceiling. They then branch off into seven arms. At each end they hold five watt light bulbs mounted on fittings. Fine steel cables attached to a light structure lift the arms, giving them the typical form of the classic chandelier as they hang from the ceiling.  The construction of this chandelier is so light that it moves when there is a breeze in the house, thus creating an interesting shadow play.

Check out the SevenUp:

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timbaute-sevenup

Paperclip Lamp – An Icon That Microsoft Tried to Kill

paperclipconcept

Ha, I kid.  We Windows users loooove that freaking little paperclip, don’t we…

David Wykes and Benoît Colette have produced the Paperclip Lamp – a design that takes the ol’ humble paperclip and turns it into something we don’t rush to click off with our mouse whenever we open Microsoft products.  The Paperclip Lamp is LED sourced, and works on the concept that people like me pick up paperclips and bent the bejeebus out of them without thinking.

Well, that might be stretching the truth a bit – about the concept part.  It’s totally true about every time I pick up a paperclip I mangle it into something otherworldly.

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Thanks, Fubiz!

Diego Chilò’s Granduca Light Sculpture

Diego Chilò‘s very large illuminated statue, the Granduca, was unveiled for the italian glass and lighting manufacturer Venini at EuroLuce 2009.  It can be up to nine meters tall, and is covered with little opalescent glass plates. I am dying to know A) how many lamps are in the Granduca, and B) how on EARTH you change them when they go out!

granduca

granduca

Thanks, Contemporist!

Sputnik, Dude. Except Not In Space, In Your Living Room.

Well, at least in the prototype/concept phase right now – Shane Crozier‘s Sputnik lamp design is an LED fixture-slash-art piece-slash storage container.  It looks like it stands about six feet tall.  Where the heck am I going to put that thing?  According to Shane’s page on the Sputnik fixture, the four LED antennae do fold in a bit, so you could stick it in a corner if you’re like us, in a one-bedroom apartment.  Check out some pictures:

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Thanks, Crunchgear!

Torn Lighting

One of the writers for the Yanko Design blog, Billy May, created a series of sort-of wall-integrated LED lighting fixtures – referred to as “torn lighting,” they blur the edge between structure and fixture.  I love the description on the siteAnyone who has spent a significant period of time either living in a
small windowless apartment or tripping through the galaxy on a mind
bender may have at one point felt the urge to tear a hole in the wall
to let some light in.

Torn Lighting


Adam Frank – The “Reveal” Fixture

My wife pointed me to a post by Not Martha about the latest fixture from Adam Frank Incorporated – the “Reveal” fixture.

Essentially, it’s a projector, casting a multi-focus image onto whatever surface you desire.  The fixture boasts steel templates, and small waves in the projected image creates a feeling of a light breeze moving through the tree scene.

The “first edition” of Adam Frank’s fixture is limited to 1000 units – at $380.00 a pop.  It looks like a pretty interesting fixture, undoubtedly, but thank God I’m a lighting designer.

Adam Frank also uses light as his medium as an artist – check out some of the galleries I found here.