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Vintage Power and Light: The Coolest Thing to Happen to Tungsten Since Edison!

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If you’ve been to an architectural lighting, entertainment lighting, or decorative lighting trade show lately, you should notice an interesting trend:  the lack of attention to incandescent light sources.  The light emitting diode has overtaken the world, and like myself, I miss the days of the warm tungsten filament in a room, bathing everything in its reach with a wider spectrum of color than its LED counterparts.  Tungsten filaments, at least decoratively, have become the fine wine of our lighting generation – only those with the intelligence and artistic knowledge in using tungsten and other incandescent sources have continued to do so.  The rest of the world is convinced, at the behest of excellent marketing and often regardless of price, that LED illumination is not only the way of the future but also today’s only way to appropriately design lighting.

It’s a fact that in many applications, including modern high bay methodologies and architectural applications, LED light sources are winning hearts and minds over their higher-energy-consuming incandescent cousins.  Sooner than later we’re going to see higher output automated fixtures giving their HID counterparts a run for their money, too.  ETC’s LED Source Four ellipsoidal, Chauvet’s Ovation LED ellipsoidal, Altman Lighting’s ME3 ellipsoidal, and Robert Juliat’s Tibo and Zep LED profiles have taken the market by storm – and have begun pushing back on the use of tungsten-halogen sources, arc sources, and even halogen sources!

On the whole, energy costs when dealing with a large facility or venue are where LED and non-incandescent sources make a monster difference in energy costs.  But what about where energy costs are negligible, like in your home?  If saving comparatively a few dollars here and there in your home is less important than the feeling and artistic appreciation that something like an incandescent lamp brings to you, can you put a price on your happiness?  I’ve owned many a compact fluorescent lamp-based fixture in my home, and frankly I replace every single CFL with its halogen or incandescent counterpart.  It’s my decision, and I do what makes my eyes and my brain happy.

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On that thought, I introduce to you the work of Vintage Power and Light out of Austin, Texas – creator Lowell Fowler (of High End Systems fame) has started a new hobby art venture based on utilizing the beauty and intrigue of vintage lighting and electrical equipment tied with the warm glow of incandescent sources.  Even better than just the sexiness of a glowing filament structure, Vintage Power and Light takes the beauty of an Edison filament wrap source and melds it to gorgeous finished old-world wood components, then adds stunning copper and brass connections and controls.  My favorite parts of Vintage Power and Light’s work are their use of Consolidated Design glass insulators – there is nothing quite like a multi-petticoat glass insulator on a fixture with an artistic incandescent filament turning that glass into a mystical piece of glowing jewelry.  GAH!  This stuff is amazing!!!

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Lowell and York Fowler have put an interesting new spin on the idea of Steampunk-esque design by bringing old-world components and combining them with early 20th century incandescence.  The result is a stunning and refreshing take on using incandescence as not only an artistic statement, but a comfortable, familiar, and heartwarming addition to your house, office, or anywhere else that LEDs just don’t cut it.

Check out a series of gallery images below, click on any image for a light box of that gallery for your perusal!
Just make sure that you give credit where credit is due, and all of these photos are courtesy of Vintage Power and Light with photography by Tim Grivas.

First things first, Vintage Power and Light’s Table Lamps:

Vintage Power and Light’s Chandelier and Pendant series:

Got a Steampunk jones?  Vintage Power and Light does that too!

Last but not least, a gorgeous offering of sconces for your collection:

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JimOnLight says HELL YES to Vintage Power and LightAwesome offerings, guys!  We hope that the whole world sees your work and loves it as much as we do!

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The Daily Lamp: Terrence Seah’s Cloudline Lamp – Sleek, Slim Uplight

Today’s Daily Lamp is a really minimalist but inventive take on uplighting in the home. Meet Terrence Seah’s Cloudline Lamp — a true uplighter with a sleek design and nice lines:

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Cloudline, designed by Terrence Seah for seller Livdin, comes in white and red, and both are $239 bucks.  From the Livdin page on the Cloudline:

Enhance your room with warm diffuse light and set the mood with touch-sensitive dimming. The Cloudline lamp is simple to wall-mount, and takes up no floor space. Pleasing illumination in an equally pleasing package.

FEATURES

  • Bright light equivalent to a 60W incandescent light bulb
  • Energy efficient 13W power consumption
  • Long lasting 20-year lifespan LED bulb
  • Aluminum construction with glossy powder-coated finish
  • Oiled walnut accent
  • Long braided power cord

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Lamp, 21.5″(L) x 2″(W) x 3.25″(H)
  • Dimmer Switch, 5.5″(L) x 1.75″(W) x 0.75″(H)
  • Power Cord, 6′ plug-to-switch, 8′ switch-to-lamp

It sure is beautiful!  Can you imagine five or six of these around a large room?

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 Thanks, Uwofo!

The Daily Lamp – Flank Light, from Sonja Tonev (Which is AWESOME)

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Today’s Daily Lamp is absolutely excellent; I was pretty excited to look into its background, design, and ideas!  Sonja Tonev, a Serbian designer, has created an atypical lamp form that works in any configuration you can imagine, including hanging it from something.  Or standing it on its side or end.  Or laying it horizontally.

You get the idea.

From Sonja’s Archinect page on Flank Light:

I came up with an idea of lamp’s shape while I was exploring different linear forms. I discovered an applicable form for a multi functional lamp which can primary be used as a floor lamp, but also as a pendant.

The Flank lamp allows consumers to place it on the floor both horizontally or vertically. It is stable in any position because of it’s simple shape. Such shape lets consumers manipulate visual perspectives by changing their view angle of the lamp.

The lamp is made by bending a steel tube at particular angles and by placing two neon lights on the inner side. On the ends of each neon there are special “push” systems placed inside the tube which make it easy to replace the neons. There is a weight inside the tube, located at the curve from which the cable is coming out. This way the stability of the lamp is improved when standing vertically.

Sexy!  I’m a fan of the bi-directionally focused light sources — a true 90+ degree spread!

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The Daily Lamp – Light Forest, from Ontwerpduo

Today’s Daily Lamp just blows my mind — meet Light Forest from Ontwerpduo, which consists of Tineke Beunders and Nathan Wierink of the Netherlands.

From Tineke and Nathan’s catalogue page for Light Forest (ps, it’s a PDF link):

On the ceiling or on the wall,
Light Forest grows where other lights will not go.
As a climbing plant the system spreads itself through
the space, to give light with its calyxes.
Using obstacles, height differences, beams,
 flat walls and ceilings, the lighting system is installed.
Small and geometrical or large and chaotic.
Custom made for each space.

So Ontwerpduo comes in and does each of these installations to fit the space that they’re going to live within — I call that some excellent design!  Check out this beauty — or at least some examples of it, as each one is customized:

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Something I find kind of awesome — the designers posted their prices online too for this custom install:

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I also adore the text they add in the catalogue that explains the install process:

1.  Ontwerpduo makes a composition of Light Forest directly in the designated space. Together with the customer we discuss possibilities and wishes, and we will make a layout of Light Forest in the space with tape. In this way it will be clear how the lamp will be positioned in the space. After approval this composition will be measured. In the workshop of Ontwerpduo the lamp is made. Then we visit again to place Light Forest permanently onthe wall and/or ceiling.

2. Ontwerpduo receives the customer’s dimensions of the space, possibl y supplemented by photographs.  Based on these measurements and the wishes of the customer we make a visualization of Light Forest. This composition is discussed and may be adjusted.  After approval, the lamp is made in the workshop of Ontwerpduo. Then we come with Light Forest to the space, and we will place the lamp to the wall and/ or ceiling.

3. Starts with the same procedure as No 2. but we don’t place the final lamp ourselves. Light Forest will be shipped with instructions, and the client assembles Light Forest himself in the space.

Lovely, Ontwerpduo.  I am a huge fan of this piece!

The Daily Lamp – LogLamp from Jari Nyman and Olli Mustikainen

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Talk about minimalist, this must be the week of minimalist brain waves in the designer department!  This is a lamp based on a log in a fireplace; you push down on it to turn it on, it lights up.  Push down on it again, off it goes.

Meet LogLamp, from Finn designers Jari Nyman and Olli Mustikainen:

LogLamp from Jussi Peso on Vimeo.

From the websites of Jari Nyman and Olli Mustikainen:

LOG lamp. Inspiration has come from a burning log in a fireplace. Press the wood block down and it pops up to expose the light. Press it again and it switches the light off.
Materials: various types of wood
Finishing: wood wax

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Pretty cool!

Vanessa Hordies’ Night Night

I’ve really been digging getting back into researching fixtures, lighting systems, and interesting designs of lighting lately!  It feels good to be able to get back to the initial idea behind JimOnLight.com – sharing cool information about light.  WHAT A CONCEPT!

Check out this new fixture from designer Vanessa Hordies – it’s called Night Night:

Night Night is an interesting concept for a sleepy-time lamp – when you flip over the lamp itself, a timer for 15 minutes resets itself, giving the user about 15 minutes to fall asleep.  That’s about the perfect amount of time to fall asleep.  WAIT A MINUTE!  THIS MUST BE ON PURPOSE!

(that’s sarcasm.  oh yeah.)

Vanessa Hordies does have a website, but there’s not much there but an info email and a picture of the Night Night.

Thanks DesignBoom!

It’s Friday. Get Coffee, Then Check Out These Fixtures!

Happy Friday, everybody!

It’s been a crizizzaay week, has it not?  A lot has happened this week – all good stuff, no doubt, except for the fact that I have an ulcer, but I’m sucking it up and getting over that pronto.  When I pass, I’m half-tempted to donate my body to science so that they can all wear their hazmat suits as they dig through hundreds of productions and years of abuse living in and loving my industry.  Love it.

A good friend of mine – my favorite Mexico City resident, actually – Orquidea Vara sent me a link to these excellent lighting fixture images – all printed in 3D.  VERY cool.  I hope this gives you some inspiration on this very busy Friday!

Check out the whole set of drawings at the photostream of i.materialise.  Enjoy!

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Brain Games

The Creation lamp

Exploding cappuccino lamp

Clone lamp

Parametric design

Medical meets Design!

Muchas gracias, Orqui!

Martin Neuhaus’ Becherlicht – A Cup, Uh, Lamp?

This is an interesting project.  I am still not totally sure if I like it, but you can make your own decisions.

So, Martin Neuhaus’ lamp, Becherlicht, is a projection-type luminaire.  A source of light shines onto and through a transparent “cup” (I say that in quotes, but I think it’s really a cup” that projects onto a wall.  To me, the cup creates what looks like a shade shape onto the wall surface, which seems to be the point made by the designer, who wanted the “aha!” factor with the shade.  It attaches to the wall, as in the image below – but when it’s off, what exactly is it?

I like the idea of a projected “thing,” whether it be color, shape, whatever – but what I would hope is that I can put whatever the hell I want into that holder.  I want to stick a template in there, a colored glass, a plate, whatever I feel like.  It does come in a few colors.  I still want to put other stuff in that slot to create my own lamp.

Eh, to each his or her own.  I think it’s novel.  Make sure to check out Martin Neuhaus’ website.

Thanks, DesignBoom!

Ross Lovegrove’s 100% Lamp

Italian lighting manufacturer Danese has commissioned designer Ross Lovegrove for a fixture called the 100% Lamp – a simple, controllable fixture with an interesting design feature – the circuitry is on the outside of the lamp:

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The design is simple and elegant – bent aluminum sheet with a white paint coat, and the circuitboard/control affixed.  The control device is a screen-printed BAS plastic card that is also affixed to the unit, and control of intensity is via a sensor embedded within the card.  The orange circuitboard on the rear of the lamp is Kapton material, used in flexible printed circuits.

The LED source for the lamp is a cluster of 3 X 5W LEDs with an efficacy of 70 lumens per watt.

From the Danese Milan site:

The inclination of the head is dictated by a LED angle calculation so that an equilibrium between the correct illumination of a wide work area and the dazzling monitoring can be achieved. The challenge of a substantial technological innovation is faced by relying on overall “subtraction” principles. The body of the lamp is composed of a very light sheet of aluminium 5 mm thick, cut and softly bent. The base widens forming an area different from the worktop on which to store personal belongings.

On the front of the body of 100% Al light is integrated Danese’s technologically advanced switch. You insert a serigraphed ABS card into the aluminium body, which contains the sensor that regulates the turning on and the intensity of light emission. The feeding and the connection among the LEDs, the touch dimmers and the electronic components can only work in the flexible Kapton circuit. This combination of technology and innovative design rises in the Metadistretti project environment and it is developed by Danese in partnership with Micromac.

Check out more images:

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Thanks, DeZeen and DesignBoom!