Posts

It’s Official, High End Systems is an ETC Company Now

Just heard the news — ETC has officially acquired High End Systems, so now High End Systems is an ETC company.  I’ve heard lots of rumors and speculation about the future, but none of it is bad, all of it is good for High End Systems.  Richard Belliveau and his team have innovated our industry very far, and I would argue that we have him to thank, among others of course, for what we have to call an industry today.

From the news room at ETC:

High End Systems, an ETC Company

ETC acquires High End Systems

Middleton, WI (31 March 2017) – ETC and High End Systems announce today they are joining forces as ETC completes the acquisition of the Austin, TX based company from Barco Inc. “We welcome the High End team to the ETC family. ETC will provide a strong support structure for High End to continue to innovate and make great products for the industry,” says ETC CEO Fred Foster.

High End is known for dynamic products such as the Sola family of all-LED automated fixtures, and Wholehog consoles. David Lincecum, VP of Marketing at ETC says, “We value the High End products and plan to expand work on their portfolio. We want customers to know that ETC will protect your investment in High End products through strengthened service, support, and development.”

The addition of High End enables ETC, a current market leader in the theatrical, broadcast and architectural markets, to broaden its strategic focus and pursue additional desired areas of technology growth. High End gains the oversight of an experienced lighting industry management team to help the company better realize its full potential as a market leader in event lighting.

ETC will operate High End as a separate company located in its current Austin, TX facility. High End customers will continue to contact the Austin office for sales and service, and sales distribution channels worldwide remain the same for the foreseeable future.

And there we have it!

Merges and Acquisitions – Lighting Industry Business Happening Now

2017 has already been stupid busy for the lighting industries.  There are more than a handfuls of deals going on right now that I know about, and I’m sure another two handfuls after that I don’t know.  Business is moving upwards in this Trumpian economy for some reason.  Seriously, look at the gentle climb under Obama, then look at the rise in business stocks since Trump:

Look under November 2016…  See the huge dip and then ENORMOUS rise, right around the middle of November?  Business stocks picked up MAJOR steam right about then!  I wonder why that was…  hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmTrump.  When businesses are in control of their financial growth for the next however many years this is going to go on, you will see more of a rise and steady growth in the dow and NASDAQ numbers.  Businesses will make more money.  The real test, especially in our industries, is if that growth will translate down into the foot soldiers of lighting, its men and women infantry of photon superiority out there stringing cable and programming fixtures to make the shows great for people.  This is and always will be the test; watch which companies put back in when they get something out, as arbitrage business opportunities can really show a company’s strength, or lack.

In 2017 so far, and forgive me if I’ve missed any, there has been news of three major business decisions that have been or are close to being finalized:

  • Samsung acquired Harman, who recently bought Martin Lighting
  • Electronic Theatre Controls (ETC) is working out acquiring High End Systems, who has been a BARCO company
  • Chauvet and Sons just acquired Chamsys, the lighting control manufacturer

That’s a whole heck of a lot of movement!  It’s like the early 2000’s when Vari*Lite was sold to Genlyte Thomas and all of those VLPS offices closed across the country, and then Genlyte Thomas was purchased by Philips, which then made Vari*Lite a Philips Entertainment company.  Maybe this stuff is only interesting to me, but I love watching how companies behave when they don’t have to behave a specific way, if you know what I mean.  Companies get to operate as people, legally, and if we act like crappy people, we get labeled as a crappy person.  I think the same goes for companies — watch how companies behave, it is literally your responsibility, like it is mine, to police our industry.  The same goes for policing your own reputation, but there are a series of posts dedicated to that particular subject coming out very soon, and they are going to be epic.

Starting with Samsung acquiring Harman/Martin, from the Samsung Newsroom:

Samsung Electronics and Harman International Industries, Incorporated today announced that they have entered into a definitive agreement under which Samsung will acquire HARMAN for $112.00 per share in cash, or total equity value of approximately $8.0 billion.  Upon closing, the transaction will immediately give Samsung a significant presence in the large and rapidly growing market for connected technologies, particularly automotive electronics, which has been a strategic priority for Samsung, and is expected to grow to more than $100 billion by 2025¹ . HARMAN is the market leader in connected car solutions, with more than 30 million vehicles currently equipped with its connected car and audio systems, including embedded infotainment, telematics, connected safety and security. Approximately 65% of HARMAN’s $7.0 billion of reported sales during the 12 months ended September 30, 2016 are automotive-related, and its order backlog for this market at June 30, 2016 was approximately $24 billion.

HARMAN’s experience designing and integrating sophisticated in-vehicle technologies, as well as its long-term relationships with most of the world’s largest automakers, will create significant growth opportunities for the combined business by enabling it to leverage Samsung’s expertise in connected mobility, semiconductors, user experience, displays and its global distribution channels. In addition, the combination of HARMAN’s brands and audio capabilities and Samsung’s expertise in consumer electronics will deliver enhanced customer benefits and elevate user experiences across Samsung’s complete portfolio of consumer and professional products and systems.

“HARMAN perfectly complements Samsung in terms of technologies, products and solutions, and joining forces is a natural extension of the automotive strategy we have been pursuing for some time,” said Oh-Hyun Kwon, Vice Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Samsung Electronics.  “As a Tier 1 automotive supplier with deep customer relationships, strong brands, leading technology and a recognized portfolio of best-in-class products, HARMAN immediately establishes a strong foundation for Samsung to grow our automotive platform. Dinesh Paliwal is a proven global leader and, in our extensive discussions, we have developed deep respect for him, his strong senior leadership team and HARMAN’s talented employees.  HARMAN’s sustained track record of rapid growth fueled by technology leadership and an unmatched automotive order pipeline reflects its commitment to innovation and customers.”

“The vehicle of tomorrow will be transformed by smart technology and connectivity in the same way that simple feature phones have become sophisticated smart devices over the past decade,” added Young Sohn, President and Chief Strategy Officer of Samsung Electronics. “We see substantial long-term growth opportunities in the auto technology market as demand for Samsung’s specialized electronic components and solutions continues to grow.  Working together, we are confident that HARMAN can become a new kind of Tier 1 provider to the OEMs by delivering end-to-end solutions across the connected ecosystem.”

Dinesh Paliwal, HARMAN Chairman, President and CEO, stated, “This compelling all-cash transaction will deliver significant and immediate value to our shareholders and provide new opportunities for our employees as part of a larger, more diversified company.  Today’s announcement is a testament to what we have achieved and the value that we have created for shareholders.  Samsung is an ideal partner for HARMAN and this transaction will provide tremendous benefits to our automotive customers and consumers around the world.  Combining Samsung’s strengths in leading-edge displays, connectivity and processing solutions with HARMAN’s technology leadership and long-standing customer relationships will enable OEMs to provide new offerings for their customers.  Partnerships and scale are essential to winning over the long term in automotive as demand for robust connected car and autonomous driving solutions increases at a rapid pace.  This transaction will bring HARMAN and Samsung’s complementary strengths together to accelerate innovation in this space. More broadly, this investment underscores the strength of HARMAN’s employees, as well as our success and leadership across our markets.  We look forward to working together with Samsung to elevate experiences for consumers worldwide.”

Customer Benefits and Significant Growth Opportunities

Samsung expects the combination to deliver significant growth opportunities and benefits to customers by leveraging Samsung’s and HARMAN’s complementary technologies, resulting in increased market penetration across important end markets.

• Automotive:  Combining HARMAN’s leadership in new connected car technologies, including its top positions in infotainment, cyber security, over-the-air updates and telematics, with Samsung’s significant expertise and experience in connectivity technologies, including 5G, UX/UI, display technology and security solutions, will enhance HARMAN’s automotive and connected services businesses to drive greater sales and provide significant benefits as automakers speed the adoption of next-generation connected cars.

• Audio:  HARMAN’s leading brands and cutting-edge audio systems include JBL®, Harman Kardon®, Mark Levinson®, AKG®, Lexicon®, Infinity®, and Revel®.  The company also licenses Bowers & Wilkins® and Bang & Olufsen® brands for automotive.  All of these brands will greatly enhance the competitiveness of Samsung’s mobile, display, virtual reality and wearable products to deliver a fully differentiated audio and visual experience for customers.

• Professional:  The combination will also expand the combined company’s business-to-business platform through its ability to deliver integrated, large-scale audio and visual professional solutions at stadiums, concert facilities and other performance centers such as The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and STAPLES Center – home of the GRAMMY Awards®.

• Connected Services:  Samsung will gain access to HARMAN’s 8,000 software designers and engineers who are unlocking the potential of the IoT market.  This collaboration will deliver the next generation of cloud-based consumer and enterprise experiences, as well as end-to-end services for the automotive market through the convergence of design, data and devices.

Operating Structure and Leadership

Upon closing, HARMAN will operate as a standalone Samsung subsidiary, and continue to be led by Dinesh Paliwal and HARMAN’s current management team.  Samsung is pursuing a long-term growth strategy in automotive electronics, and plans to retain HARMAN’s work force, headquarters and facilities, as well as all of its consumer and professional audio brands.  Samsung believes the combination will increase career development and advancement opportunities for the employees of both companies.

Samsung’s Automotive Electronics Business Team, which was established in December of 2015 to identify opportunities for Samsung in the automotive sector, will work closely with the HARMAN management team to realize the full growth potential of the combination.

Terms of the Transaction

The purchase price represents a premium of 28% based on HARMAN’s closing stock price on November 11, 2016 and a 37% premium to HARMAN’s 30-calendar day volume weighted average price ending November 11, 2016.  Samsung expects to use cash on hand to fund the transaction.  The agreement has been unanimously approved by the boards of directors of both companies.

The transaction, which is subject to approval by HARMAN shareholders, regulatory approvals and other customary closing conditions, is expected to close in mid-2017.

Advisors

Evercore is serving as financial advisor to Samsung and Paul Hastings LLP is acting as legal counsel.  J.P. Morgan and Lazard are serving as financial advisors to HARMAN and Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz is acting as legal counsel.

Next up is the acquisition of High End Systems by ETC from BARCO — so many letters!!  From a post here at JimOnLight:

Middleton, WI (01, March, 2017) – ETC and Barco announced today that they are in the midst of serious discussions wherein ETC would acquire High End Systems. While the timeline for the completion of this acquisition is still unknown, both parties are committed to moving forward with a successful transaction.

Wim Buyens, senior vice president of Barco’s Entertainment division, commented, “For Barco, the divestment of its lighting activities is in line with its strategy to sharpen the focus on its core activities. We believe joining forces with ETC would enable High End Systems to realize its full business potential while providing ongoing support and opportunity development for its customers, and we appreciate ETC’s commitment to maintain High End’s operations in Austin and fully support the development of High End’s products.”

Fred Foster, ETC CEO commented today, “ETC has been executing a strategy to grow our company. We want to offer our employee-owners opportunities for greater personal success and continue to give our customers innovative products and services. We see adding HES to the ETC family as an opportunity for both of those things. Our plan is to continue High End operations from their current location in Austin, TX. High End products like the Sola family of LED automated fixtures, Wholehog consoles, and Axon media servers are innovative tools for the live-events industry. Our intention is to make the investments needed in order to restore these products and the High End brand to market-leader status.”

Foster continues, “We place a high value in not only the High End products, but also the employees that will join our ETC family with the completion of this acquisition. Both companies have similar core values when it comes to innovation and I know working together will be a great success.”

More information will be announced in the coming weeks, once the acquisition reaches final stages.

Then Chauvet comes out and BOOM!  They acquired Chamsys.  From the Chauvet newsroom:

SUNRISE, FL, USA – Chauvet & Sons LLC has announced that it completed the acquisition of ChamSys Ltd., the Southampton, UK-based designer and manufacturer of lighting controllers. ChamSys provides Chauvet a strong presence in the controller market that complements its CHAUVET Professional lighting fixtures and LED video panels.

“We are very excited about the opportunity to join forces with ChamSys,” said Albert Chauvet, CEO of Chauvet & Sons LLC. “ChamSys has a well-deserved reputation for innovation, quality and value, the same principles that are at the heart of our own Chauvet brands. Together ChamSys and Chauvet are now in a position to better cover and serve worldwide markets.”

ChamSys will continue to operate as an independent business unit from its facility in Southampton, UK. ChamSys founders Chris Kennedy and George McDuff will remain as Managing Directors of the company and, together with Sales Director Tony Cameron, will continue to lead its current staff of software and hardware engineers, operations, sales and support teams.

The ChamSys industry standard MagicQ series of lighting control products will continue to be sold by the company’s current network of distributors, except in the USA, where Chauvet will sell and support ChamSys products from its Sunrise, Florida headquarters. The CHAUVET Professional sales team will assume responsibility for ChamSys sales in the USA. They will have the full-time support of Phil Watson, former CEO of ChamSys, Inc. who has been named ChamSys USA Director.

“We’re committed to maintaining the ChamSys brand and its reputation for excellence by supporting the vision and culture of its management team,” added Albert Chauvet. “At the same time, we’re also looking forward to building ChamSys in the USA and making this outstanding line of controllers available to an even larger market.”

ChamSys Managing Director Chris Kennedy echoed this enthusiasm. “Chauvet and ChamSys share similar cultures, a strong sense of respect for our customers, an appreciation of our staffs and a powerful drive to be the best in our markets,” he said. “This partnership is clearly a logical step for both companies. We deeply appreciate that Chauvet is committed to building on our 14-year heritage so that ChamSys becomes even stronger in the future.”

 

A major congratulations to all of the people and companies involved here, I look forward to seeing what happens next this year in our beloved industry!

Company links:

Samsung // HARMAN / MARTIN

ETC // High End Systems

Chauvet and Sons // Chamsys

BARCO’s Talking to ETC About Buying High End Systems

Well, we’ve all been wondering who was sniffing, now we know — BARCO is in talks with Electronic Theatre Controls (yes, THAT ETC) about putting High End Systems somewhere within the ETC line.  It’s not a secret that the Revolution didn’t quite hit the rental market like they liked (although it is a fine moving head for its application), and this is a brilliant move for a manufacturer already in a good place with the conventional market, high quality LED markets, and theatrical lighting control market.

We here at JimOnLight.com always have a place in our heart for the High End brand, and I personally am always glad for people to get to continue to reap the creations that come from Richard Belliveau’s big ol’ brain.  Awesome, ETC and High End!

From an email from High End’s marketing department:

Barco and ETC announced today that they are in the midst of serious discussions wherein ETC would acquire High End Systems, Barco’s lighting activities, part of the Entertainment division. While the timeline for the completion of this acquisition is still unknown, both parties are committed to moving forward with a successful transaction.

Wim Buyens, senior vice president of Barco’s Entertainment division, commented, “For Barco, the envisioned divestment of its lighting activities is in line with its strategy to sharpen the focus on its core activities. We believe joining forces with ETC would enable High End Systems to realize its full business potential, while providing ongoing support and opportunity development for its customers, and we appreciate ETC’s commitment to maintain High End’s operations in Austin and fully support the development of High End’s products.”

Fred Foster, ETC CEO commented today, “ETC has been executing a strategy to grow our company. We want to offer our employee-owners opportunities for greater personal success and continue to give our customers innovative products and services. We see adding HES to the ETC family as an opportunity for both of those things. Our plan is to continue High End operations from their current location in Austin, TX. High End products like the Sola family of LED automated fixtures, Wholehog consoles, and Axon media servers are innovative tools for the live-events industry. Our intention is to make the investments needed in order to restore these products and the High End brand to market-leader status.”

Foster continues, “We place a high value in not only the High End products, but also the employees that will join our ETC family with the completion of this acquisition. Both companies have similar core values when it comes to innovation and I know working together will be a great success.”

More information will be announced in the coming weeks as it becomes available.

From the ETC Press Ninjas, Rachel Frederick in particular:

Middleton, WI (01, March, 2017) – ETC and Barco announced today that they are in the midst of serious discussions wherein ETC would acquire High End Systems. While the timeline for the completion of this acquisition is still unknown, both parties are committed to moving forward with a successful transaction.

Wim Buyens, senior vice president of Barco’s Entertainment division, commented, “For Barco, the divestment of its lighting activities is in line with its strategy to sharpen the focus on its core activities. We believe joining forces with ETC would enable High End Systems to realize its full business potential while providing ongoing support and opportunity development for its customers, and we appreciate ETC’s commitment to maintain High End’s operations in Austin and fully support the development of High End’s products.”

Fred Foster, ETC CEO commented today, “ETC has been executing a strategy to grow our company. We want to offer our employee-owners opportunities for greater personal success and continue to give our customers innovative products and services. We see adding HES to the ETC family as an opportunity for both of those things. Our plan is to continue High End operations from their current location in Austin, TX. High End products like the Sola family of LED automated fixtures, Wholehog consoles, and Axon media servers are innovative tools for the live-events industry. Our intention is to make the investments needed in order to restore these products and the High End brand to market-leader status.”

Foster continues, “We place a high value in not only the High End products, but also the employees that will join our ETC family with the completion of this acquisition. Both companies have similar core values when it comes to innovation and I know working together will be a great success.”

More information will be announced in the coming weeks, once the acquisition reaches final stages.

BARCO’s stock is kinda kicking some booty — here’s the last year to date:

BARCO’s one year stock performance

 

Keep kicking the photons, High End Systems!!  Nothing but love for you!!

Getting to Know the LED Ellipsoidal Generation – A JimOnLight Series Introduction

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I’ve done a lot of shows in my career so far. I’m lucky as hell, don’t get me wrong – but because of it, I feel like I have a real “bond” with incandescent and high-intensity discharge lamps (HIDs) that we use in this industry. It’s almost creepy sometimes – in my head, I know how a good ol’ no-color Source Four looks in a dark theatre. I know how an Altman 360Q looks in a theatre sitting next to it, too – and how it looks sitting with a Shakespeare, also uncorrected, next to a Source Four. As I close my eyes to write this, I can see how an old Strand 30-degree feels inside of a theatre or outside during an outdoor performance, and how a tried-and-true PAR64 can burns so beautifully bright and amber when it’s going through red shift during a nice slow fade-up during a song in an arena. Even awesome old Kliegl 6×8’s have a good beam still, as long as the optics are changed from those miserable step lenses!

As a side note, I listened to Vesa Honkonen tell a story when I was attending graduate study in Sweden about “trusting” the light from a certain type of reflector, and how that trust cost him time and money on a project.  So as a bit of an aside, with every statement is an equal anti-statement!

I have gotten to know the fixtures in our industry very well because I’ve been fortunate to use them in a real variety of performance situations and installations. When you get to know something like an ellipsoidal fixture with an incandescent lamp in it and you use it over and over and over again, you get to trust the fixture.  I can say with ease that I trust the light that comes from the business end of a Source Four; at the same time, I trust the light that comes out of an Altman 360Q as well, whether it has an HX601 lamp in it or an old FEL lamp.  As a designer, as an artist — I know what that light from an incandescent lamp in one of the “typical” variety of ellipsoidals is going to do for me in a scene on actors of any skin tone, or on a presenter during, or on film and video, and whether it has a chunk of R26 or L181HT in it.  I know that kind of light.  I trust that light.

In the world we live in now, incandescent lamps are slowly becoming forcefully shunned by a growing portion of the lighting industries as a whole (and politicians, sadly), with LED replacements becoming the forced norm by pretty much all of the companies that at one time were pushing an incandescent based fixture.  These companies are all now driving quickly on the road of a really good trend: to produce a fixture that provides the same kind of light or better than that of an incandescent lamp based fixture with a lot less power consumption and without losing any light quality.  Sounds easy enough, right?

There is a strange, edgy, “new car smell” feeling towards the new strains of LED fixtures making their births into the industry.  We are inundated with them at the trade shows in our business, just like we were with the incandescent conventionals.  Manufacturers, this is perfectly acceptable, and I think that it’s one of your biggest assets in this industry.  It’s your job to make us trust your fixtures, through hands-on videos and “shoot-outs” between incandescent and LED fixtures out there.  My informal surveying of conference attendees over the last three years has seen many responses like “TOO MANY LEDS” and “If I see another crappy wannabe LED fixture at another trade show, I’m going to die.”  Believe it or not, this is a really good thing — it provides an opportunity for the exceptional equipment to rise to the top of the Diode Ocean, as I like to call it.  Lately, these exceptions are overcoming their inferior rivals, much to my happiness.

Users, we have a job to do, too — we have to give the manufacturers the chance to trust LED light.  We have to learn how it is different than its incandescent counterparts.  We’ve had all of these decades to learn how to work with incandescent light (and HID light too, for what it’s worth), and we know it.  We trust it, and we love it.  But why is that?  It’s because it’s what we know, and it really is that simple.  Once we give the LED ellipsoidal generation a chance, you know we’re going to trust that too.  This isn’t to say that LEDs are done developing, this obviously isn’t true.  But I am noticing some unbelievably incredible advances in LED engines and output technology lately, especially after LDI in October 2012, and I have to say that I am finally ready to learn to trust LED conventional ellipsoidals.  It’s hard not to at this point to see that LED ellipsoidals are becoming the obvious choice, with the color temperature tuning we see now and the low power requirement that they provide — and to argue against energy consumption and power conservation is just not in my DNA.

Over the next 2 weeks I’m going to be comparing the LED conventional ellipsoidals we see in Entertainment to their incandescent counterparts over the next month, starting with ETC’s new Source Four LED line first, followed by Robert Juliat’s Zep and Tibo ranges, then moving on to the RevEAL Profile from Prism Projection, and so on.  In the mean time, let’s take a look at the characteristics I’ll be examining that I find important to applying trust, at least on paper – you can argue that there are more to see, but for the sake of argument, let’s start with:

  • Cost Comparison:
    What kinds of costs are we looking at over the course of an LED Ellipsoidal lifetime?  How different is it, really?
  • Light Output, or Perceived Brightness:
    How does it compare to a comparable incandescent conventional?
  • Spectral Analysis:
    What is the white light in the beam comprised of with respect to wavelength?
  • Power Consumption:
    When you put an LED ellipsoidal up against an incandescent lamp at 575W, how does it perform?
  • Weight:
    I have to stick these in a truck and on a truss at some point, so what is the difference I need to know?
  • Controllable Properties:
    Obviously I have only a few with an incandescent fixture, so what comes stock in an LED ellipsoidal that makes a difference?

Let’s go on this journey together.  When we work on something together as an industry, we get to make it how we want it to be, and manufacturers listen.  Once we started to get involved with the ways that incandescent lamps were developed and lighting designers started demanding better control over design and engineering of incandescent lamps, they improved.  All we have to do now is learn what the LED Ellipsoidal generation can do for us, and we can really make a difference.

Image

Fun Trivia: Hide and Seek Hopper in ETC’s HQ

Electronic Theatre Controls’ headquarters in Middleton, Wisconsin is generally accepted as unbelievably awesome. ETC won In Business Magazine’s “Commercial Designs of the Decade” award for best development in a large building. Amongst the tangle of storefronts, theaters, and towers; its own “town square” buzzing with inspiration and creation, is a replica of a very famous diner–American realist painter Edward Hopper’s “Nighthawks.” Some cool trivia many do not realize is–quite a few more of Edward Hopper’s paintings influenced ETC’s Town Square. The storefronts were influenced by “Early Sunday Morning” and the bank entrance at the headquarters which houses the finances department with “New York Pavements” and “Summertime.” Characters from Hopper paintings are also visible, including:

• From “Four Lane Road” an older man in a chair, located across from ETC’s deli

• Also from “Four Lane Road” the woman is seen leaning out a window above the Habberdashery (the clothing and swag shop) • “Girl at a Sewing Machine” is also across from the deli, but closer to Manufacturing

• The man from “Pennsylvania Coal Town” is seen by the Century Theatre’s ever-changing marquee

• From “New York Office,” a woman seen above the bank

• From “Room In Brooklyn” the girl sitting with her back to the window

Edward Hopper was a fabulous painter and printmaker. His works portray all the light our eyes harvest from the world magnificently, and it is really fantastic that Electronic Theatre Controls’ headquarters holds such clever tributes to Mr. Hopper. Without light, there is nothing for a painter to portray.

 

 

 

Nighthawks reception photo by John Jacobsen.

Happy Monday and Namaste to Everyone!

Lumen on Daddy's shoulder

I’m writing from the very, very hot state of Oklahoma, in a city hotter than Hell itself, Oklahoma City.  I think we’re on our 30+th day of 100 degrees or above in a row.  How awesome is that?!  I went outside the other day, saw a guy burst into flames – and OKC is in the Bible Belt!  Wackity schmackity doo!

Since I broke my toes last week, I won’t be attending ETC’s very excellent CUE Conference taking place in Middleton, Wisconsin this week.  From what I understand, it’s gonna be pretty awesome.  I’m pretty bummed that I’m gonna miss it.

As I sit here, I continue to work on some pretty amazing stuff myself – I have a handful of new lamps, both LED and non-LED incandescent replacements – that I am doing a lot of testing on for a big comparison post on JimOnLight.com.  What I find is that the only way to accurately report on these lamps is to put them in place in a situation that they would normally perform in and report on that situation.  Doesn’t that just seem like a no-brainer?

a storm and Greg

Ok, back to it. I hope this finds everyone doing great today on this hot Monday!

Bill Klages Teaches Television Lighting at ETC’s Summer Camp

I finally got through ALL of my Bill Klages shots – last week at ETC’s Summer Camp in Middleton (at the ETC Mothership!) I got to listen to Bill Klages talk about setting up shots for film and broadcast.  You know who Bill Klages is, right?  He’s only the father of modern television lighting and all.

It was pretty amazing to get to see him work and teach the audience.  The man knows light, and it is so obvious how much skill he has developed over the course of his career.  I snapped a ton of shots of Bill while he was giving his seminar, and I’ve listed a gallery view below.  Click on one, and you’re transported to a mystical gallery place of images, like MAGIC!

I just loved this shot – the model is Marina, who was a champ and a good sport for the demo.

Fred Foster, ETC‘s CEO, introducing Mr. Klages.

Fred Foster giving Bill Klages his “HD” hat.

Gallery below!

A Tour of ETC’s Amazing Factory – Also Known as “The Mothership”

While I was in Middleton this last weekend for the ETC Summer Camp, I was lucky enough to get a grand tour of the place where all Source Fours, Sensor dimmers, ETC consoles, and other ETC lighting lines are created, manufactured, and repaired when necessary.  This was a pretty cool experience, quite frankly!  I have a metric ton of images for you all here – along with some narration for most of them.

*Deep breath*

I’ve put these images into a gallery with descriptions and titles – click on the one on the top left below here and the gallery pages will load up, and you can step through each images by clicking on the icons underneath each large image.  Simplicity!

JimOnLight.com Covers ETC’s Dealer and Rep Summer Camp

I had a great time this last weekend at Electronic Theatre Controls‘ 2010 Summer Camp – the great folks at ETC had me up to experience their Dealer/Rep Summer Camp Conference, where ETC dealers and representatives across the world learn about new products, existing products, talk to people working in the major leagues with their products, and generally have a good time.  The first night I was there, I had a day of learning about Selador LEDs, Unison systems, Sensor dimming, and seeing a shootout of ETC products against other products in the industry.

I mean, who hasn’t ever used an ETC product?  I can say that it certainly isn’t me – my career started out on a Microvision FX, and ETC stuff has been in my career since then.  It was pretty great to meet everyone, see people I knew, and meet new people that I will know from now on.  The factory is pretty awesome – I’ve got a post all about that on its own, as well as a post with Bill Klages’ lecture about television and film lighting!

One of the absolute highlights for me at this conference was listening to Pete Weigland and Nick Gonsman give a demo on integrating wireless devices with the EOS console.  Nick and Pete gave so much information on wireless devices in general that my mind was absolutely full of information on wifi, and happy to be so full.  Thanks, Nick and Pete!

Check out some images, won’tcha?

Me and Lowell Olcott rocking a few bottles of the Spotted Cow…  YUM!

My favorite shot of John Kuehl, ETC’s web and social media genius

David Lincecum, Jim Hutchison, Bill Klages (the father of modern TV lighting), and ETC’s Pres, Fred Foster

David Hilton and Novella Smith talking about Selador LED fixtures

The Sons of Sunset jamming in front of the ETC Mothership!

Here’s a ton more shots – in gallery format!  Click one and flip through them all!

Thanks for having me, ETC!

RIP Jody Hanson from ETC

Oh wow.  What a bummer of a thing to read.

ETC‘s long time Promo and Ad Manager, Jody Hanson, passed away this last weekend.  I just found out about it.  That lady was awesome – a hard driving deal maker with a respect and knowledge of the lighting industry that we all call home.  Jody understood how important the world of blogging and Social Media was to the industry, and she was supportive of people like myself in the beginning of our careers.

We’ll miss you, Jody.

From ETC’s press release about Jody’s passing:

Middleton, WI (2 June 2010) — A mainstay of ETC’s Marketing department for over 13 years as the company’s Promotions and Advertising Manager, Jody Hanson passed away on Sunday, May 30, 2010. The global family of ETC grieves the loss.

From January 1997, when Jody started at ETC, she brought her passion for professionalism to the ETC Marketing team, locally and globally. Entrusted with ETC’s representation to the promotional media, Jody was well known and respected in the industry. She led countless successful promotional campaigns and projects for ETC — on every new product since the introduction of the Obsession® II lighting control console.

As Electronic Theatre Controls’ Chief Executive Officer Fred Foster reflects, “Jody gathered together a truly creative team of people who produced more than 100 trade shows, hundreds of media placements, and uncountable hits on our website. They all followed her professional lead to produce a precise and complete image for ETC. We all miss Jody, but her impact on our lives will never fade.”

ETC Vice President of Marketing Bill Gallinghouse concurs: “Jody had a unique ability to break down the largest and most complex objectives into manageable parts and guide them perfectly to fruition.”

Born on January 10th, 1954, Jody was a Wisconsinite who made the Madison area her home for the last 14 years. She is survived by her husband John, and her daughter Emily.

A memorial will take place for Jody on Saturday, June 5th, 2010, in her hometown of Columbus, Wisconsin, at St. Jerome’s Church, 1550 Farnham St., starting at 8:30 a.m., followed by a memorial mass of burial at 10:30 a.m.

In lieu of flowers, the family asks that people make donations to or volunteer time with their favorite charity.

Please use Cornerstone Funeral Services’ online guestbook to express condolences to the family:
www.meaningfulfunerals.net/fh/obituaries/tribute.cfm?o_id=626959&fh_id=11053&s_id=B7DF14561337816249238C23C057EAAB