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Barco to Release Cyberlight 2.0

Updated!

Cyberlight2_500px

There’s been a lot of news out lately on the release of the new version of an older classic scanner (mirror luminaire), the Cyberlight 2.0, from High End Systems/Barco.  If you’ve done any lighting design for entertainment and used a scanner in the last decade, there is a good chance that you’ve used a Cyberlight – it is and was a popular mirror fixture in the industry.  High End Systems/Barco has re-engineered this classic, added some new stuff, and made some old stuff better.  iSquint posted the release on this a few days ago – I’ve been putting together some research on a comparison between the Cyberlight 2.0 and the older model, Cyberlight Turbo.

I was having a discussion with a buddy about the redesign of the Cyberlight, and he could not figure out why Barco made this move.  I frankly liked the Cyberlight, and I am excited to see the new version, and how it stacks up against the old version – I am assuming the new one will be at LDI, so hopefully we’ll get to see it (hint, hint, Barco, please).

There are some applications where a mirror luminaire is choice over a moving head – for example, if I am trying to get beams of light to move back and forth very fast (you know, like with the untz-untz-untz-untz of some Drum and Bass), a mirror fixture might be a good choice.  This is simple physics – the mirror servo can travel faster because it has less distance to go and less weight to propel than a moving head.  There are reasons each designer can tell for choosing one over another – I have my reasons, and other people have theirs.

I’ve been looking at the specs from the Cyberlight Turbo and the new Cyberlight 2.0, noting differences and additions.  From the specifications only, there are some similarities (this isn’t ALL similarities, just some):

  • both have 170 degree pan, 110 degree tilt
  • both have optical zoom (13-22 degrees or 16-26 degrees) and same 36 degree field angle
  • both have CMY color mixing
  • both have full optical dimming and fade to black
  • both have a dichroic static color wheel with seven colors and white
  • both have a seven position effects wheel, plus open
  • both have a static Litho pattern wheel (seven gobos) and a rotating Litho pattern wheel (four gobos)

The Cyberlight 2.0 version has some added features over the Cyberlight Turbo (again, some, not all):
UPDATE:  I got an email from Brad Schiller at High End with more information about the Cyberlight 2.0 changes.  Thank you, Brad!

  • Cyberlight 2.0 has a 2,000w short-arc MSR lamp at 30,000 lumens at 7,000 degrees Kelvin – the
    (Turbo has a 1,200w short-arc MSR lamp at 12,500 lumens at 5400 degrees Kelvin)
  • Cyberlight 2.0’s Litho patterns in the static wheel are all replaceable
  • Cyberlight 2.0 has 28 DMX channels, compared to Turbo’s 20 DMX channels (see chart below)
  • New software that allows the mirror and other parameters to move faster
  • 3 new effects on the effects wheel
  • 5-pin DMX connectors
  • New DMX protocol that fits current protocols better
  • New DMX controlled options such as TriColor, random strobes, macros, and more
  • RDM capabilities
  • Electronic power supply that dims the lamp when the shutter/dimmer is closed (saves electricity and reduces heat)
  • Electronic strobe capabilities
  • Taller base handles for better clearance of the DMX connectors
  • LED menu system instead of dipswitches
  • 2 pounds lighter
  • Cyberlight 2.0 has a fixed head that does not deviate – High End interviewed lighting designers about this feature, and discovered that while it was useful at times, it wasn’t really desired.

I’ve put together a few comparison images from the product data sheets on the Cyberlight Turbo and the Cyberlight 2.0.  I’m looking for some photometric data on the GE MSR 2000 SA/SE, which is the lamp designated for the new Cyberlight 2.0.  Anyone seen this?

First, a side-by-side on DMX assignments for the Cyberlight Turbo and the Cyberlight 2.0:

cyberlight-dmx-assignment

Next, a side-by-side comparison of the static Litho wheels in Cyberlight Turbo and Cyberlight 2.0:

cyberlight-wheel-comparison

Last but not least, and only last for right now, a side-by-side of the rotating Litho pattern wheels for Cyberlight Turbo and Cyberlight 2.0:

cyberlight-rotating-wheel-comparison

No More Cyberlight, No More Studio Beam

cyber studiobeam

I just read an article at iSquint about two more fatalities in the growth of technology:  the High End Systems Cyberlight and the High End Systems Studio Beam.  ETC stopped taking orders for the Express and Expression lines in the Fall of 2008 – I assume for promote the Congo, Eos, and Ion.  As technology advances, road warrior products like the Express console, Cyberlight and Studio Beam have to take a bow and have a seat.  High End will be continuing support on the fixtures indefinitely.

These products were essential to my proverbial “teeth cutting” into the industry.  Thanks for your service!

Thanks iSquint and High End!