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.PSLAB Beirut and MYBAR

Wow, good morning world.  I have to apologize for the last week of relative dead space – I put in about 90 hours last week and toured my design of The Light in the Piazza to a theatre in Arkansas.  It’s been a crazy week!

But to welcome the little bit of sanity I am holding onto right now, I want to post about a new project that PSLAB in Beirut has done.  I got this from my pal Ramsey at the .PSLAB Beirut offices – I have to say that any time I get info from .PSLAB, I have been so impressed.  I get a lot of images from lighting firms all over the world, and .PSLAB produces some of my favorite works.  Their designs are just so worldly and original.

Check out the design for MYBAR, a new bar/restaurant in Beirut.  Some info from .PSLAB:

A bar/restaurant whose space is functionally divided into 3 areas; an entrance corridor, a drinking area, and a dining area. The entrance corridor leads to the drinking area which is separated from the dining area by an irregular shaped staircase extending from a rugged wall starting at the end of the corridor.

We used a line of uplights to light the entrance pathway and connect it to the drinking area.
The uplights continue parallel to the rugged wall and stairs producing a play of shadows created by the different layers in the wall.
The drinking area features floor to ceiling poles carrying small cups’ stands.
To accentuate the curvature of these poles, we set downlights at the top end of each creating a vertical beam of light detached from the rod.

The dining area is characterized by visible white ducts covering the ceiling and maintained over a two-level bar connecting the dining area to the drinking area. The furniture layout in this area follows the layout of those ducts.
We chose to use the visible ducts in order to create a lighting system unifying the two main sections of the space (drinking/dining). Hence, we developed lighting fixtures in white finish, fixed to the ceiling on the sides of the ducts. To have a rectangular horizontal beam of light centered over the tables, a gap created by the circular opening of the duct defines the shapes of the objects.
Continuing over the bar, the light objects are set on one side of the duct and in opposite directions in order to light the path behind the bar. Similarly for the sushi bar in the other end of the space.

Click on each of the images, they open into a gallery!

Beautiful.

Burgundy – A New .PSLAB Beiruit Lighting Design Project

My favorite Lebanese lighting design firm, .PSLAB out of Beirut, has just finished another interesting project – a wine bar/restaurant called Burgundy.  I just heard from my pal Ramsi at the firm this morning, and I am excited to share the project images!

From the .PSLAB press release:

A lighting project for a wine bar/restaurant having a substructure of wooden arched beams cutting through a wire mesh covering the ceiling. The setting of the space underneath the substructure is functionally divided into two sections: a bar area and a dining area.

Highlighting the dual function, the lighting objects are set on two parallel axes over these two sections.

Suspended from the arcs, each light object is a set of conical tubes conceived to fill a circular-shaped area. Clustering in the circle, the tubes start at the center; moving radially, they begin to deviate at an angle of 25 degrees to reach an angle of 45 degrees. This deviation renders a chandelier-like object, with a bottom curved outline opposite to that of the ceiling. The cluster of the tubes housing the bulbs creates an effect of a singular light source being filtered.

The entrance is lit by a set of black projectors also using the arched beams for fixation; the groove in the beams encloses the technical parts box, while the head of the projector is left loose to rotate shedding light in different directions.

A lighting project for a wine bar/restaurant having a substructure of wooden arched beams cutting through a wire mesh covering the ceiling.The setting of the space underneath the substructure is functionally divided into two sections: a bar area and a dining area.Highlighting the dual function, the lighting objects are set on two parallel axes over these two sections.Suspended from the arcs, each light object is a set of conical tubes conceived to fill a circular-shaped area. Clustering in the circle, the tubes start at the center; moving radially, they begin to deviate at an angle of 25 degrees to reach an angle of 45 degrees. This deviation renders a chandelier-like object, with a bottom curved outline opposite to that of the ceiling.

The cluster of the tubes housing the bulbs creates an effect of a singular light source being filtered.The entrance is lit by a set of black projectors also using the arched beams for fixation; the groove in the beams encloses the technical parts box, while the head of the projector is left loose to rotate shedding light in different directions.

Cool!  My other favorite type of lighting design is architectural and interior – so these kinds of projects always thrill me to write about whenever they come across the desk!

Check out some images – and make SURE to check out .PSLAB’s website!

Thanks, Ramsi!

PSLAB Beirut Lights Al Dente, Now It’s Well Done

Ha haaa, pardon the wordplay there, sometimes I just cannot help myself.  I just got word from my pal Ramsey at .PSLAB Beirut that the firm has just completed another concept project!  PSLAB is one of my top five favorite lighting design firms on the planet – they’re like my Chicago Blackhawks of the architectural lighting design world.

Press release below, then awesome imagery.  Ramsey, tell everybody I said excellent work!

Al Dente Restaurant, Beirut- Lebanon

.PSLAB BEIRUT was asked to develop a lighting concept for al dente restaurant in beirut–lebanon.
The high ceiling restaurant is divided into 3 areas: the main central area containing the entrance and the main hall, a secondary hall and a bar area.
We developed twig-like metallic fixtures to be mounted in clusters at the center axis connecting the entrance to the main hall.
For the secondary hall and bar area, we developed superposed brass discs carrying the light source and fixed to the ceiling by means of a metallic rod. The linear layout of the fixtures and the continuity of the line of light defines the depth of the spaces.

Check ‘em out:

Thanks, Ramsey!