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Tupac Martir’s Satore Studio is About to Rock Your Face

There are a very small group of people who live in our society who see things in the way that we all see things in our heads, but have the ability to take those brilliant, beautiful twilight thoughts and make them real for all to experience.  These people have the ability inside them to transform a location with art and light completely, or tell a story so vivid and so real that the lines between the production they design and the experience the audience has are blurred beyond reality.  My friend Ann Davis is one of those artists, Peter Morse and Jeff Waful are too; TJ Gerckens is one of those artists, as is Martin Kuhn from Moodbox in Switzerland.

This post is about one of those kinds of artists – the kind of person who sees a different color at night than most.  This post is about Tupac Martir of Satore Studio — so, JimOnLight readers, meet Tupac Martir — in this instance talking about one of his works, Nierka:

Now meet Tupac and his Satore Studio:

Show reel from Satore Studio on Vimeo.

It’s a rare occurrence when you meet someone whose ideas are so revolutionary, so different from mainstream thinking that they produce mainstream thinking.  It’s something that we all strive for, but you either have that talent or you do not have that talent.  No matter how much you pay on Yale, sometimes you just don’t have it.  Tupac has this talent; it always frankly just blows my mind when we talk about the projects he’s doing and the work that his firm is plotting.  An example of this would be one of his recent works, Nierka.  Or, if you happened to be at Coachella Music Festival this season back in April 2011, you would have seen Tupac’s work as well (in collaboration with another outstanding design firm, United Visual Artists):

Tupac does all kinds of design work with his firm all over the world.  His touch extends to artists like Beyonce, Elton John, Sting, Jon Bon Jovi — and to the fashion world, bringing his intimate knowledge of lighting to create overwhelmingly beautiful runway events during Fashion Week for designers from Vivienne Westwood to Alexander McQueen and everything in between.  Designers like Tupac Martir (in a small pool of creative visionaries of our day like Neil Austin, Ann Davis, definitely Kevin Adams) are what I see as the next round of Appia and Craig in our society — in other words, these are the kinds of people to bring about the next big change to the way we think about certain things in our lives.  And, if not everyone will see and experience these changes, at least those of us who see their works, experience their art, and perhaps get lucky enough to collaborate on a project can have that realization that comes with seeing the work of a committed visionary.  You have to get it how and while you can get it, right?  I mean, “eh?”

I met Tupac because Nierka is using the BlackTrax technology from CAST.  We met at the ProLight + Sound Show in Frankfurt, and became fast friends.  It’s the whole “brother from another mother” thing that happens in the Universe, you know how it goes.  The man has creativity falling out of his beard; it’s hard to tie it down to one or two brilliant things.  I recently gave a seminar at PLASA 2012 with Tupac on using the wysiwyg suite to solve production problems, and I’ll share some of that seminar soon — but it was a pleasure to share the stage with an artist who is as proficient technically as they are artistically.  That’s right — Satore Studio is known for having f%$#ing amazing production paperwork.  I’M IN LOVE!  Stage Managers across the world unite — an artist CAN have excellent paperwork AND create great designs!

You have to see the video of Nierka below — it shows what Tupac is doing with tracking, and it’s pretty cool:

More Tupac and Satore Studio eye porn:

If you’re trying to find out who’s hottest and who’s doing the most innovative work, make sure that Tupac Martir and Satore Studio is on the top of your list.  I’ll be posting more about Tupac Martir and Satore Studio’s work as the days grow on.  Have an awesome Monday, everyone!

Update, Monday, September 17, 2012 @ 0746:
New photos from Satore Studio’s lighting of London Fashion Week — Williamson, Westwood, and House of Holland!  Beautiful!  See below.

 

Singer Sewing Machines? Nope, Lighting Fixtures and Musical Instruments. Awesome.

Please tell me you have seen this:

Sewing Machine Orchestra from Martin Messier on Vimeo.

Have you seen any more of this guy’s work? “This guy” (and I imagine the thumbs up pointing back at himself for some reason) is Martin Messier. Martin’s an artist, obviously, and his work is pretty darned neat. Check it out!

From the Vimeo video site about the video:

Sewing machine orchestra is the first version of a performance created by martin messier. the basic sounds used in this performance consist entirely of the acoustic noises produced by 8 sewing machines, amplified by means of microcontacts and process by a computer.

the microcontroller system also enable to use the sewing machines to affect certain parameters of the acoustic sound. the wheel, for exemple, can be assigned to the output volume, etc. machine’s mechanism can be activated by remote, using microcontrollers and a computer, without the need for any other human intervention.

these old objects has the effect of taking the imagination further, primarily through their evocative power. whether they remind of specific incidents or recall the relationship to such objects, few people remain indifferent when they see them.

this creation was made possible with the support of the canada council for the arts.

audio, light, performance : martin messier
electronic: samuel st-aubin

320,000 Kilowatt Hours Wasted Per Minute

Chris Jordan, an artist from Seattle who produces a lot of commentary work on consumerism, has produced a series of work called Running the Numbers.  In this work is a painting called Light Bulbs, which makes commentary on the 320,000 kilowatt-hours wasted by the United States every minute through things most of us probably don’t think of often – computers in stand-by, poorly engineered wiring, leaving the lights on, etc.

The work is huge, as in size – 72″ X 96″ (six feet by nine feet), and includes 320,000 images of a light bulb to represent each wasted kWh.

Actual detail size:

running-the-numbers-chirs-jordan

A little zoomed out:

running_the_numbers

Zoomed out:

running_the_numbers_chris_jordan

The works in Running the Numbers are all along this theme of over-consumption.  Check out some of his current works here, and check out his portfolio here.  Running The Numbers is showing at the Kopeikin Gallery in Hollywood until October 17, 2009.

Ross Lovegrove’s Andromeda

andromeda

I love fixtures that use their shape to cast light texture into a room.  Hence, I love this fixture by Ross Lovegrove, called the Andromeda Light.  Ross made this fixture for Yamagiwa, and if you’ve seen the work on Ross’s website, you would see it as another extension of his style.

From Ross Lovegrove, via The Contemporist:

Andromeda is an artificial structure for capturing artificial light.

Emerging from the concept of Netification; the reduction of physical mass through selective perforation across a pre defined form; the concept floats more as a diatomic sea creature in the free ocean of space. It floats in a state of apparent anti gravity, capturing its light within to graphically delineate a structural net as a soft external shadow of itself. The light that is emitted from its LED clusters is reflected back into itself via mirrors orientated to maximise their output and to freely distribute a very pure light. It becomes the source of ambient light within a room, vesting gentle forms like large roots onto adjacent surfaces to form extended relationships onto and into architectural dimensions.

The piece is moulded from a single material as a unified white Botanical, aquatic organism to softly implant a sense of nature into the spaces we inhabit.

Cool.  Nice work, Ross.

andromeda

Hideo Kawamura’s On-Off Lamps

on off

Wow, I really like these lamps – Japanese art director Hideo Kawamura’s On-Off Lamps are pretty awesome pieces of two-faced art, giving one look while off, and another while switched on.

From Hideo’s Coroflot bio:

I am an Art Director working in Tokyo, JAPAN. After graduated from Musahino School of Art & Design, joined Tanaka Noriyuki Activity Inc. in 1992 and I founded a design office, Kawamura Hideo Activity Inc. in 1997. Mainly do graphic & product design. An original product design label Rezon® started from 2006 and the first product lamp shade “ONOFF” won Good Design Award / Product Design Section. Our goal is making everyone’s life better with power of design.

These are really interesting fixtures – I dig em!  Also, check out Hideo’s Coroflot portfolio.

on off

on off

on off

Lindsey Adelman and Glass Light

I’ve written about Lindsey’s work once before lately – I just saw a post at Design Sponge talking about a few of her pieces, and announcing a show coming up for Lindsey this weekend.  Lindsey is going to be at booth #1942 at the International Contemporary Furniture Fair in NYC this weekend.  Check out a few pieces of her work:

lindsey adelman

lindsey adelman

Also, Lindsey’s Adelman studio website has great images of her work, too.