TESLA: The Race to Zero Point Free Energy

Looking for something awesome to watch tonight?  Laura and I are going to watch the documentary Sirius again in the next few days, but this next submission is on the list right after.

free-energy-device

For all of you out there that believe like me that we can have free energy in our lifetimes — check this out!  This movie is called TESLA: The Race to Zero Point Free Energy, and it’s fantastic.  Produced in 1997, get ready for some of the science-fiction-est transitions and video effects that 1997 had to offer, but the content of this film is of immense importance.

Cue this up for later tonight, make sure you’ve given YouTube enough time to buffer through the movie, grab the popcorn and settle in for some awesome documentary action.

From Google Videos
Lightworks Video&Audio
Directed by Chris Toussaint

Hosted by Bill Jenkins, formerly of ABC Radio, this comprehensive documentary features physicists and inventors who are challenging orthodox science to bring this non-polluting technology forward despite ridicule and suppression. See actual working prototypes that defy classical physics including phenomenal experiments in anti-gravity and the transmutation of metals.
http://www.lightworksav.com/
http://www.freespiritproductions.com/
http://www.tewari.org
http://www.lutec.com.au/
http://www.calphysics.org/zpe.htmlhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero-poi…

free_energy_at_home

Editor’s Note:
You’d be surprised how many times I get an email or a Facebook message about posting information relating to the idea of free energy here on JimOnLight.com.  Most of them are friendly stabs and jabs about how nothing of this sort could ever work, how it defies the fundamental laws of thermodynamics, and that I should be ashamed of myself for promoting this kind of fantasy.  I have only one thing to say to all of the naysayers of free energy, the zero point field, perpetual motion, and electrogravitics in general:  In our world today, where income disparity is at its absolute most disgusting and the banking cartels control now even the price of aluminum cans, would it be such a bad thing if people paid attention to making their own free power instead of wasting their lives watching brain destroying trash like Honey Boo Boo and reruns of Jersey Shore, among other unbelievably high rated and worthless fodder?  

I don’t think so either.  We have to take back our world, and do it now.

Bill Nye the Science Guy Explains Climate Change

climate-change-101

This is an awesome video — Bill Nye the Science Guy takes on the science vs. the myth of climate change.  What do you think?

CLIMATE 101 from Climate Reality on Vimeo.

AND, as a special Friday bonus, here’s Reggie Watts talking about the Price of Carbon, courtesy of Climate Reality!

CLIMATE 101 from Climate Reality on Vimeo.

Happy Friday, July 5!

ISS Star Trails TRON-IZED

This is astronaut Don Pettit.  Don’s got a whole bunch of cameras on board the International Space Station, or at least he did on missions Expeditions 30 and Expedition 31 to the ISS.

Don took a whole bunch of awesome photos that were turned into one cool time lapse video, but given a crazy Tron-like twist.  Watch this, it’s well worth a few minutes:

ISS Startrails – TRONized from Christoph Malin on Vimeo.

Now this guy, this is Christoph Malin, he is responsible for the video above.  He’s also awesome.

From the video:

Do you remember 1982’s “TRON” movie? The plot: A computer programmer (epic: Jeff Bridges) is digitized inside the software world of a mainframe computer, where he interacts with various programs in his attempt to get back out. I loved the light cycle races and strange solar wind ships…

Back in the real word the ISS is in a way one of these solar ships, constantly rotating around us. A tiny white spot, as it can be seen racing over the sky from time to time, when illuminated by the sunset (and sunrise ;).

This Video was achived by “stacking” image sequences provided by NASA from the Crew at International Space Station (see alsofragileoasis.org/blog/2012/3/on-the-trails-of-stars/). These “stacks” create the Star Trails, but furthermore make interesting patterns visible. For example lightning corridors within clouds, but they also show occasional satellite tracks (or Iridium Flashes) as well as meteors – patterns that interrupt the main Star Trails, and thus are immediately visible.

The many oversaturated hot pixels in some of the scenes are the inevitable result of ultrahigh ISO settings the Nikon D3s in ISS-use are pushed to for keeping exposure times short by all means (owed to the dramatic speed the ISS travels). As there are no dark frames or RAW data currently available, hot pixels are not easy to remove.

After the initial stacking, all images have been sequenced with Apple Motion and the Video cut and edited with Final Cut Pro X. Stacking done with StarStaX, get it here: markus-enzweiler.de/software/software.html

This Video would also not have been possible without that great minimal soundtrack “Eileen” by Lee Rosevere (members.shaw.ca/happypuppyrecords/index.html) that totally nailed the mood, as well as a short clip of “Window #3″ by Two Bicycles (freemusicarchive.org/music/Two_Bicycles/Beko_Crash_Symbols_1/07_Window_3). VIMEO MUSIC STORE ROCKS!

All sequences and images courtesy “The Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth”, Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center, eol.jsc.nasa.gov/Videos/CrewEarthObservationsVideos/
Closing sequence © Christoph Malin / ESO.org / filmed at Cerro Paranal.

Thanks a lot to my favourite bad Astronomer, Phil Plait at BadAstronomy for first posting the film (blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2012/10/16/my-god-its-full-of-star-trails/) and many many thanks to Vimeo for the Staff Pick!

A truckload of thanks go out to NASA astronaut Don Pettit (petapixel.com/2012/06/25/astronaut-don-pettit-floating-with-his-huge-camera-collection-on-the-iss/) and his colleagues for taking these images, and making films like this one reality!

Finally, please also be aware of the growing issue of light pollution (plightwithlight.org/index.php?id=49&L=1) one can see in many of these scenes! Support IDA (darksky.org) on their challenge to preserve the night sky for us and our children, on reducing energy waste! And don’t forget, it is your tax money that lights up the sky!

Oh, and visit my friends at the UNESCO Project TWAN (twanight.org) for some of the coolest nightsky images and videos on our planet! One people, one sky!

Always believe in your dreams and make it possible!

All the best,
Christoph Malin
christophmalin.com

PS: At about 1:42 you see Comet “Lovejoy” rising…

PS2: Be sure to check out my other Movies:

“Astronomer’s Paradise”, vimeo.com/36972668 – featured on National Geographic
“The Island – Teaser”, vimeo.com/27539860 – featured on NG
“Urban Mountain Sky”, vimeo.com/40969904 – featured on Discovery Channel
“Black Hole Sun”, vimeo.com/24149087, featured on NG

facebook.com/christoph.malin
twitter.com/#!/christophmalin
twanight.org/cmalin

Indeed. I love the world, humans are awesome.

Thanks to PetaPixel for the Don Pettit photo!

Quadrotor Light Show

What happens when you take a four rotor helicopter and some photons?

 

With the help of mirrors… ONE TOTALLY RADICOOL LIGHT SHOW:

So what did you just see? The production by University of Pennsylvania’s GRASP (General Robotics, Automation, Sensing and Perception Lab) uses 16 quadrotors both as lighting devices, but also the mirrors they’re equipped with to manipulate light.

If anyone has more information about how the quadrotors, mirrors, and fixtures are controlled and their interactions programmed, I would love to know! Please post a comment, or you can always reach me via my bio in the footer, the contact form, or daphne (at) jimonlight (dot) com!

Congratulations to the team: Jonathan Santana & Xander Smith (event concept), Juliette Larthe (producer), Marshmallow Laser Feast (Memo Akten, Robin McNicholas, Barney Steel, Raffael Ziegler, Rob Pybus, Devin Matthews, James Medcraft), KMel Robotics (quadrotor design and development), Oneohtrix Point Never (sound design), Sam & Arthur (set design) Holly Restieaux (production supervisor), and Farrow Design (typography and design).

Thanks to Peter Kirkup for directing me to the topic on Blue Room!

Moonlight Mini-Lesson

The above photo by Andrew Tallon was taken at 10:30 pm! What I love about this image is it perfectly exemplifies that our moon is just a reflector for sunlight.

So why don’t we see our night landscape this way, if a camera can capture it?

A number of fascinating factors!

Our moon’s albedo (the measurement of amount of light reflected by astronomical objects) is 0.12, which means about 12% of light which hits the moon is reflected. This amount is subject to fluctuation by numerous factors, including the phase of the moon. The amount which hits the earth’s surface can be–and frequently is–significantly less.

To capture the above image, the shutter was open for 30 seconds. Our eyes have our own tricks for seeing in low-light scenarios, which involve our fantastic friends the rods and cones. The outer segment of rods contain the photosensitive chemical rhodopsin (you might know this as visual purple). Cones contain color pigments in their outer segment. Our rods predominantly help us in low light level environments, which means that we have significantly decreased color perception in moonlight.

Cones are located in the center of the eye and are high-density. Rods meanwhile are located around the cones, so in extreme darkness, a 1° blind spot is developed in the central region of the eye where there are only cones. Rods reach their maximum concentration around 17° each direction from the center line, so sneaking some sideways glances actually improves your nighttime perception.

Our rods are not equally sensitive to all wavelengths of light. They are far more sensitive to blue light, and at around 640 nm, are pretty much useless! Click this graph from the University of New Mexico to check it out:

This means that the color of light the moon is actually reflecting appears significantly different to us because of its low intensity.

A neat example I found on the American Optometric Association’s Website which caught my interest was:

For example, in a darkened room, if one looks at two dim lights of equal illumination (one red and one green) that are positioned closely together, the red light will look brighter than the green light when the eyes are fixating centrally. If one looks to the side of the dim lights about 15-20 degrees, the green light will appear brighter than the red.

If you’re planning on shooting your own moonlight landscapes, be a light geek! It is hard to find focus at night, so place a luminous object near your focus, whether it’s a lantern, or a friend with their cell phone! If you want to be super geeky, tape a laser pointer to the top of your camera, then manually focus on the dot.

 

So, with all of this science in mind, how would you replicate moonlight now, vs how you did previously?

DIY 8 X 8 X 8 LED Display – You Bet Your Tukus I’m Building One of These

One of the Duluth Crew, Alex Rugowski from Twitter, posted a tweet about this crazy 8x8x8 LED display this morning.  This thing is driven with MatLab – remember that crazy thing?!  You have to see this video – the fades are pretty smooth for an 8 pixel square 3D display!  The engineer of this awesome project is a guy named Nick Schulze, and he runs a blog called How Not to Engineer.  I highly recommend taking a look around Nick’s site, he is a true nerd in every sense of the world.  So glad to hear of you, Nick!

Check out the video of Nick’s monster in action:

Dave Jones Talks About Thermal Design for Electronics

I’ve talked a lot about Dave Jones from time to time on JimOnLight.com – Dave is in Sydney, Australia, and he is one of my favorite nerds.  Like, way up there, near Collin Cunningham.  Yeah.  Dave knows his stuff.  It also doesn’t hurt that he’s a lot of fun to listen to, which makes me watch his spot regularly!

Dave just did another segment of his Electronics Engineering Video Blog – this time on some basic theory on calculating for thermal heatsinks for electronic gear – like LEDs and other opto-semiconductors.  Really, just put this on and go about your work.  I guarantee you’re gonna learn something awesome over your lunch hour.

Dave, you rock.  Next time I’m in Sydney, I’m SO buying you a pint, mate.