AVOLITES QUARTZ! AVOLITES QUARTZ!! What-what?!

It’s dropping at PLASA in London in just a few short weeks, but we here at JimOnLight got the skinny on some masked detail photos of the upcoming Avolites Quartz from a secret source deep inside Team Avolites that we refer to as DEEPFADER, in an attempt to sound less like a porno than it already would have.

Check this out, I have to get my hands on this or I might just wilt into a crying ball of ridiculous:

avo-quartz

From my source…

The Quartz is the most cost-effective fully featured console in the Avolites Titan range. Offering all the power of Titan in a super-portable package. A bright built-in touchscreen, the latest on-board processing and all the flexibility of Titan Net connectivity mean the Quartz punches above its weight.

More details:
12.1” high brightness touchscreen (similar performance to that in TTII) 1 x Gigabit ethercon port
4 x 5-pin DMX connectors
ArtNet and S-ACN support
Compatible with Titan Net backup, multi-user and DMX expansion
Up to 16 universes from console alone
10 playback faders
3 optical encoder wheels
Front and rear-mounted USB ports
5-band sound to light support (implementation from v9 onwards) Expand control surface with Titan Mobile Fader Wing

…and from LSi Online:

UK – Avolites is going down the ‘size matters’ route at this year’s PLASA London, showcasing new wings to enlarge its industry-leading consoles, and unveiling a brand new, compact console aimed at the touring market.

The Avolites team will be on stands M10 and M20 at London’s ExCel for PLASA, which runs from 5-8 October 2014. First up, they will be offering hands-on demos of the new Quartz console.

“Quartz is the newest addition to the Titan Mobile family, complete with on-board processing and a bright, vibrant 12.1″ screen,” says Avolites sales manager, Stephen Baird Smith. “Super compact, measuring only 42.5cm wide, the Quartz is positioned as the ideal companion for lighting projects ranging from touring and festivals to clubs and one-offs. It is Avolites’ smallest fully-featured console.

“Featuring the same high quality faders and hardware you’ve come to expect from Avolites, the Quartz can go anywhere you can, ideal for life on the road.

“Offering full compatibility with Multi user, the Quartz is also perfect for use as a back-up or extra programming surface, cutting your programming time. Quartz is ready to benefit from multi band Sound to Light Triggering functionality, offered in Titan version 9.”

Also on stand will be the Avolites Tiger Touch Fader Wing, which has the same profile as the Tiger Touch II and features 30 playback faders all electronically labelled with an LCD screen.

Avolites will also be exhibiting its ‘ultimate in live control’ Sapphire Touch and new Wing, offering an additional 30 motorised faders and a third hi res touch screen.

The full Titan range is also available for demo and hands-on experience, running the amazing software features of the new Titan Version 8, packed full of the latest features to enhance the Titan experience and take your shows to the next level!

As well as the entire Titan range, Avolites will be showcasing the Ai S2 media server, which offers all the benefits of Avolites’ powerful hardware in a server drastically reduced in size and cost. Also on the stand will be latest Ai Infinity EX servers, and the Sapphire Media.

The team has spent 12 months listening carefully to what users felt they needed from the next installment of Ai. The results of this user led development process are illustrated in an impressive version 8 feature set and a more unified workspace that delivers ‘everything you always wanted’ in a media server. It’s truly a game changer.

Too.  Freaking.  Cool.

Super Bowl Halftime Show – Starring The Who, and THE LIGHTING!

I just heard on NPR last night that 106.5 million plus people watched the Super Bowl on Sunday – more people than any other event on TV in the history of the world.  The last thing that had that kind of viewers was the final episode of M*A*S*H*, back in 1983 – 105.97 million.

(for those of you kids who have no idea what M*A*S*H* is, it was a show about surgeons in a war zone)

One of the things that is still getting some major press is the big spectacle half time show, starring The Who:

For those of you who are like me, I paid more attention to the lighting design for the Super Bowl half time show than I did The Who – I mean, don’t get me wrong, I think they rock.  They did at least when they were younger.  Who did rock this time was the lighting design team and suppliers for one of the biggest shows of the year – and the rumor is that the entire rig had a total of six minutes to get on the field and working.

Oh – and pre-viz/lighting design for the Super Bowl Half Time Show?  It was done in Cast Software’s wysiwyg Suite!  OH YEAH!  (That’s right, I love it, you love it, and it is the epic awesome.)

The Super Bowl XLIV Lighting Team – definitely not an exhaustive list, and my apologies for the hundreds of people who got left off the list:

Lighting Designers:  Al Gurdon
Designer:  Bruce Rodgers of Tribe
Lighting Directors:  Bob Barnhart and David Grill of Full Flood
Programmers:  Mike “Oz” Owen, rocking the Vari*Lite Virtuoso, and Pete Radice
Rental Company:  PRG USA and PRG Europe
Lighting Crew Chief/Gaffer:  Richie Gorrod
Media Programmer:  Jason Rudolph

An update from Jason Rudolph himself – thanks a lot, Jason!

Lee Lodge was the creative producer handling content, which was made by Loyal Kaspar out of NYC.
XL video was the video vendor. The stage was made of 3000+ MiStrips, driven by 2 HD hippos provided by VER, Matt Waters was the server tech.

From XL Video, Ken Gay and Bob McGee were the project managers. Mike Spencer was the system engineer. Luke Pilato was the head system tech. Led techs were Rodrigo Azuriz, Trace Deroy, Douglas Eldredge, David Imlau, Fernando Gutierrez Llama, Curtis Luxton, Stephen Otten, Eric Petty, Rod Silhanek and Don Stevens.

An update from Margaret, who sends the URL of Loyal Kaspar, the company who did the video content – http://www.loyalkaspar.com

Update - Jason Rudolph writes back (Feb 11, 2010) [Thanks, Jason!]

I can tell you this, the LED fixtures in the rig were Color Blocks, most of the fixtures were VL3500 wash units with the clear lens installed, on the stage were Color Blasts, and Iwhite color blasts.  Atomic strobes all over, and a few lightning strikes for good measure.  There were also a few Alpha Beam 1500s in the rig, but I’m not sure where they were.

Oz programmed on a Virtuoso VX, I was on a DX2.

We had 2 HD hippos, and one HippoCritter for pixelmapping the Color blocks, which we only used for one song, its output was merged with the console output so that we had both as an option.

If you know any people who worked the crew, give them a shout out in the comments – what a terrific job they did!

I am expecting an equipment list soon – I will update this post as soon as I get it from my source.  But for those of you who didn’t get to see this amazing lighting feat, below are two videos, part one and part two, of the half time show.  Enjoy!

(Thanks, Times Online, for the image of The Who!)

Setting Up Pixellage – Cat West’s Video

One of the people I follow on Twitter – a gal named Cat West – has published a video on using the Echo software to collage across pixelation luminaires (ie, StudioPix and ShowPix).  It’s a good video – please check it out!


Setting up Pixellage from Cat West on Vimeo.

Also, check out Cat’s blog at Console Trainer.  Thanks, Cat!

ETC Unveils The Element Console

What’s that you say?  Electronic Theatre Controls (ETC) has released a new series of consoles!  So, to the huge family of consoles at ETC – from the Microvision FX way back in the day to the Expression line, the Express line to the Obsession line, the Congo, Eos, Ion, SmartFade, and architectural controls Unison and Pharos – welcome to the market, ETC Element!

People at USITT 2009 today will be seeing the new console.  I had a plane ticket to USITT, and I’m supposed to leave tomorrow – but I am too sick with this bronchitis crap, and I’ll be missing this year’s conference.  Someone take a picture for me?

element-angle1

ETC unveils new ElementTM lighting control consoles, USITT 2009

Middleton, WI (20 March 2009) – When customers demand, ETC listens. Users have been asking for an ETC lighting control console designed expressly for modest rigs and maximum hands-on fader control. In response, ETC is introducing their new ElementTM consoles at USITT 2009 in Cincinnati. ETC Controls Product Manager Sarah Clausen explains: “ETC defined the basic lighting controller when the Express console was introduced in 1995. We’ve seen over time that the basic lighting rig has changed. With Element, we’ve redefined what ‘basic lighting console’ means, without losing the ease of use of Express.” Element comes in two hardware versions, based on fader count (the Element 40 or the Element 60). Each supports either 250 or 500 channels and a full two universes of DMX output.

Element is directed at smaller venues like schools and houses of worship who depend on single console operators or volunteer staffers. It is designed to handle rigs outfitted predominantly with conventional fixtures (spotlights, PARs, fresnels, and their accessories – scrollers, mirror heads, gobo rotators, etc.), while also accommodating some LED fixtures and/or a small number of simple moving lights. “We based Element on our Eos® control system but with a simplified feature set in a stand-alone console,” says Clausen. Integral faders, a single cue list and command prompts echoing those of the Express console make operation of an Element console simple and direct.

ETC addressed a number of special requirements in this new console. Users asked for channel faders. ETC engineered Element with true LTP channel faders for handling simple shows directly or for building up looks for use as submasters or cues, or for editing levels live. Users wanted submasters. By turning a switch, Element’s channel faders become 40 submasters for simple playback of live shows. When submasters are needed all the time, the Element 60 console provides 20 additional dedicated submaster faders. Users wanted the simplicity of one-button operation if needed: Element records cues and fade times into a single cue list for simple playback of more complex shows using a GO button. Or, when users are ready to move up, they can access more complex timing functions like cue parts and follows to create more intricate lighting transitions.

Element also opens the realm of special effects to basic operators by recording effects directly into cues or loading them into submasters for more dynamic lighting looks.

Element even navigates basic accessory, LED and moving-light control. At the press of a button, the console’s On Demand ML Controls appear on screen with tools designed to control smaller numbers of non-intensity equipment like scrollers, gobo rotators and mirror heads for conventional fixtures. Element’s color and gel-picker tools simplify the control process further, applying appropriate colors to LEDs and color-mixing accessories and fixtures.

Smaller-scale venues like schools will appreciate the deep customer and technical support behind Element — from its on-screen prompts, Help system, and video tutorials, to ETC’s online Community Forums and standard expert 24/7 phone support.

ETC plans to begin shipping Element this summer 2009.

For more on Element, see product page: www. etcconnect.com/element

Weekly WYSIWYG: WYSIWYG and Hog 3 PC

If youi’re a Hog 3 user and a WYSIWYG user, you might already know this, but I just started using Hog 3 (being a lifetime Wholehog 2 guy, figuring it was time), and I do lots of pre-viz stuff offline.  As you’re setting up WYSIWYG Perform to connect to the virtual console, in this case, Hog 3 PC, you might notice that you’re only able to bind 4 DMX universes at a time to the Hog 3 PC through WYG.

This, at first, might seem like a real problem – especially if you’re using more than the alloted 4 bindable universes in Hog 3 PC.  For example, I’m designing a rig right now with 5 universe of DMX – my fifth universe has a bunch of VL3500 Spots on it.  So what do you do when you need to have to use more than the alloted 4 universes?  Simple – add another Hog 3 PC and connect!

So, you might recognize the image above as the patch screen on a Hog 3.  At the bottom I have my 8 VL3500’s patched into what appears to be a second DP-8000.  Yeah, that’s right.  A second DP-8000.  How this needs to work is that since WYSIWYG needs to bind four universes of 512 at a time, you have to add a second DP-8000 digitally to the mix.  SO:  universes 1-4 on the first DP stay labeled as 1-4, but universe 5 will appear as universe 1 on the second DP-8000.  Simple.

The next step is to add another DP-8000 in Hog 3 PC.  After clicking the “Patch @” key in the patch you’ll arrive at the Fixture Patch screen.  Once you’re there, click “Add” to add a second DP-8000.  Make sure that you number it 2, and that the first DP is number 1.  Click OK.

The way I have mine set up is that the first DP is using the first 4 universes, and the second DP is mapping the fifth universe to the first output on the second DP.  Confusing yet?  It’s not really.  I have my addresses labeled A-E in WYSIWYG, so 1-4 on DP1 are A-D, and E is on DP2’s first output.  Like below – this image below is DP2’s first output.

What you have to remember is that when you’re patching whichever fixtures you wanted in those universes above 4, you’ll need to make sure to select the second DP, like I have done here.  Only after you patch, obviously, will the data show up on the second DP.  The next step is to tell WYSIWYG that there are two DP’s.

Once you add your two “Wholehog III DP” devices in WYSIWYG, you need to bind to universes and number them.  Mine, just like in the patch, are labeled 1 and 2, with 1 being bound to universes A-D, and 2 being bound to universe E.

Here’s the second DP, numbered, bound, and ready to go.

As in the image above, once you have both of your DPs numbered and bound to universes in WYSIWYG, click each one and click “Connect.”  If you’ve done everything correctly, you should be right as rain and ready to go.  If stuff is still funky, check your settings on DPs in both WYSIWYG and Hog 3 PC, which is usually where the problem lies.

This is repeatable for more than ive universes as well.  If you were using 8 for example, A-D and E-H, A-d would still be on DP1 and E-H would be bound in DP2.  Easy as cake – no, it’s easy as pie.

Mmmm, pie.