Are You Teaching Relevant Lighting?

Teaching is not just fundamental, it’s imperative to our industry.
If you get pissed off reading this, it’s meant for you.
What your anger means is that you’re guilty.
This can be fixed though, you CAN be an efficient modern lighting teaching instrument.  You just have to want it.

I spend a lot of time on the road, as is obvious from my Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter accounts.  When I am on the road talking to people, I often ask them a few questions, especially the younger guys and gals — I just met a super cool girl named Victoria that has no collegiate schooling at all; she was working Merchandise on the road before making her inrow as a lighting intern.  I asked her these questions:

  1. “Where did you go to school/Who did you study with?”
  2. “Was there anything that you found you learned better on the job?”
  3. “If you had the option, what would you rather have learned in the school setting?”

Now obviously she didn’t go to college, so a few of those didn’t qualify for her.  But one thing that is a constant throb in my f*cking head is the fact that a lot of teachers I speak to, especially the tenured ones, have pretty much the same tired ass fundamental excuse for why their kids don’t know about things that are very relevant in today’s working industry:

“But college is about teaching the fundamentals, not showing them about technology.”


I'm a water surfing elephant, bitch

Of COURSE teaching lighting fundamentals is important.  OF COURSE learning how to draft by hand is important, I teach it that way too.  In order for a student to know what the task is like on a computer means showing them how to do it when their computer is dead as shit.  To that effect, also important is operating a two-to-five scene preset desk so that they understand just what a blessing it is to have access to write a stack playlist somewhere, maybe trigger OTHER playlists from that single stack.  All modern console companies allow for this, it’s your responsibility to learn it well enough to teach it back to your kids.

College isn’t cheap.  At all.  For anyone.  Your old out-of-date lectures aren’t going to cut it anymore, and it makes your institution look lazy.

If you were on quarters for example and had ten weeks per class for four years, your excuse still blows, but at least you have a somewhat terrible excuse for your tenure review committee.  If you’re on semesters and have lighting students for four years, it’s time to start servicing the industry today.  USITT wants you to do it, I want you to do it, PLASA wants you to do it, LDI offers classes SO you can do it and the rest of the people in the industry who have to deal with your mediocre teaching methods want you to do it too.

Tenure Review Committees, pay attention.  You need to start judging your people harder.  Shouldn’t tenure mean more than “hell, I put up with this shit for four years and kissed enough asses?”  This industry is so chock full of technical equipment and necessary know-how that you need to start being a bit more hard on your lighting design professors and their success rate at placing kids in gigs in the real world industry.  Having a BA or BFA student leave your place without having at least SOME know-how on how to set up a lighting network, or how to operate something newer than your Express 250 or Strand 520i, is imperative.

Since so many people in this business get their panties in an uproar whenever their shit is mentioned, understand this — those two desks just referenced are absolutely awesome desks, and frankly I would play on one if they were still spec’d in the industry on the kinds of shows your students are going to find themselves in, especially if they journey outside of community theatre.  As a matter of fact, I’ve probably forgotten more about those two desks than a lot of you will be able to teach your students, and this is a problem.

I can't be bothered to learn more, I HAVE my degree!

Let’s take a look at some of the professor excuses I get to these comments:

  • “I have a lot of University meetings I am required to attend.”
  • “I just got into the Union!  That helps my students.”
  • “I’m preparing for my Tenure Committee review.”
  • “My students had rehearsal last night so I didn’t want to push them that hard.”
  • “Half of these students have NO future in our industry.”  [REALLY?!]
  • “These are [actors/dancers/singers] who have no interest in what I’m teaching.”  [WTMF?!!!]

Well, GUESS WHAT!  That’s all more bullshit that you can save your kids from by applying yourself.  I used to teach three courses of dancers in an intro lighting course.  What came out of my mouth frequently is that “this is relevant information for those times when you’re in between companies or auditions, so you can make rent.  And, this is WAY more fun than waiting tables.”

Was I a perfect teacher?  Most definitely not, I tried to maintain my career while I was teaching.  That causes a lot of jealousy and anger among non-supportive colleagues.  But I gave a shit about giving my students relevant, useful, and pertinent information they at least could use while they started their first gigs out there.  Perhaps my colleagues didn’t like me, but most of the students I taught are working, in their chosen field.  Suck on that.


“Oh but why aren’t you teaching anymore, Jim?  Can’t you handle it?”
Nope.  I got outta Shawshank.  In most places, the pay sucks — the administration either A) could give a shit about your little ‘Thee-Ate-‘Er plays’, B) has no money ever allocated to the furthering of your craft, or C) has no plans to allocate any more money than the couple of thousand a year Lighting gets for “lamps and gel.”  Besides, playing nice with people who feel like it’s their god-given right to be crusty and shitty is not my idea of a nurturing environment for professors.  I can’t even IMAGINE what the High School market is like.  I feel that I can frankly more effectively spread information across a wider group of people doing what I do right now than I ever could as a professor.  As a matter of fact, just recently an acquaintance of mine lost her job because the Tenured Boys Club at her specific institution didn’t think she fit in, regardless of the fact that she was a great prof and had more info for the students in the crack of her ass than most of them had combined.  It’s a crying shame that happens every day across the world.

Here’s a good place to start upping your game in the lighting classroom — if you can learn about these things, you will help your students all place in jobs and graduate schools once they leave your stead.  Do you understand how important this is?  Give your students the ability to actually speak and understand today’s lighting language.  Here’s eleven places to start, with another several thousand available:

  1. Artnet, Streaming ACN, and delivering DMX over something other than your stock 5-pin DMX cable, or even worse, your 3-pin MIC cable that is fed into some shitty 3-pin to 5-pin adaptor at your “tech booth.”  These things are what is running larger format shows anymore, and frankly, most shows in general.  Artnet is not quite as good as sACN, but you’ll learn why when you apply yourself.  I know money’s tight.  Rent something to expose the students to the same old DMX, but sent and received in a new way.  It really does blow minds.
  2. Get yourself in front of the budget committees, Dean, Provost, and anyone else who will listen about some kind of “rental budget.”  Maybe VL3500 spots are out of your price range to buy, but don’t you understand the importance of students just getting to take them out of the case and plug them in?  Patch them?  Learn why you TILT first and never PAN first?  Allow them to PLAY so that when they’re in the real world with people expecting them to deliver, they make good choices because you gave them the ability to play first.
  3. I understand you already have an ETC Express 24/48 or an Express 250, or maybe even something as lovely as a Leprechon LP-612.  Why not rent in a Hog 4, MA2 lite, Avolites Tiger Touch 2, or something larger format so that your students can understand why in the real world we use more than one playback for a reason?  While we’re on that subject, familiarize yourself with things like what TRACKING is and how to use it…  what a PART CUE is…  How to use Spreadsheet on an ETC desk you may have in your theatre… what split timings are…  inhibitive submasters and why they’re useful…installing profiles for multi-channel fixtures…  ALL of that stuff is included in your stack desk, it’s all basic programming.  All this costs you is time, and if you don’t have time for your students, you don’t deserve to be anywhere near them.  Sorry, that’s our industrial reality.
  4. Have you any idea how many free resources there are out there to get you at least somewhat more intelligent for your students than you are now?!  How about Control Booth, The Light Network, ESTA, Jim On Light, ProLightingSpace, and USITT just to name a few?  What the hell are you waiting for?
  5. Electrical — teach your kids how to read a meter.  Teach them about continuity checks, they’re not always gonna have a GamChek at their disposal.  Teach them how to meter power coming from a distro, SAFELY, and show them how it is to not get dead when doing something like that.  Ever handed a young stagehand a meter and watch them struggle to even plug their leads in?  Terrifying.  Teach them which holes NOT TO STICK THE PROBES IN, too.  Holy shit.
  6. Pay Richard Cadena to come to your school.  Take your happy ass over to the chair of your department and ask him or her to ask HIS or HER boss to find the small amount of money to do just that.  When he leaves, your students will know more about electricity than you’ve ever imagined.
  7. Start studying for the ETCP test, the NCQLP test, and anything that will help you have more learned information in your LD bag of tricks.  You don’t have to actually take or pass the tests if you’re not feeling confident, but just studying those exam prep guides will show you just what you DON’T know.
  8. Get your kids involved with USITT, ESTA, PLASA, and anything else that exposes them to people like me, like Richard Cadena, like Brad White, like Richard Belliveau, Berenice and Albert Chauvet, Ford Sellers, Matthias Hinricks, Rick Hutton, Eric Loader, and working LDs like Patrick Dierson, Sooner Routhier, Josh Schultz, BudRock, Benny Kirkham, Peter Morse, Anne McMills, Tharon Musser, Kevin Adams, Natasha Katz, Don Holder, Neil Austin, Jules Fisher and Peggy Eisenhower, Chris Ackerlind, and the other thousand and a half names that didn’t just pop in my head.  Get your kids around working people like Laura Frank, Sean Cagney, Loren Barton…  people who know what the f*ck they’re doing so that your students have positive role models.
  9. Have your students study modern lighting history.  Learning about 360Q’s and Strand Century 6X12’s is no longer applicable in today’s society of lighting, because they’re going to run into a Source Four ERS or Ovation LED ERS before they’re going to see a rental gig with 360Q’s on it.  Please do this.  It is so embarrassing for a student to ask how to run the barrel on a source four, for me, you, AND them…  because you bet your ass that information is going to get to someone you know that you don’t want to have know that your student had no clue.
  10. Do you know what RDM is?  Well, that’s a shame if you said no.  I’d learn it if you want students to be prepared.  OF COURSE they need to know what they are and where they came from, it’s our SM-58, essentially — they are used all over the world still.  But that’s also like saying that if you know how to use a hand saw, you’re good with a plasma cutter.
  11. Last but not least…  download some of the free MEDIA SERVER software available out there for use and abuse.  Teach your kids that we have these little computers that allow you to send console commands to them and play videos and images on video walls.  Can you believe that?!  If you’d have been keeping yourself relevant, you could.

One more thing:  getting “tenure” doesn’t excuse you from doing your job.  At all.  If anything, it SHOULD mean that you’re trustworthy of doing something GOOD and being better at it than the others in your faculty.  I yet to see a place like that.  Tenure in today’s society means that you have a harder time getting a tenured prof terminated.

Ok, I’m done here.  Pissed off?  Good.  Start making yourself a better teacher.  You’re sending out kids into a very complicated and dangerous world unprepared.  It’s time to put on those adult lighting undies and start kicking ass.  I’m counting on you, so are the rest of us.  Remember this:  we are all ineffective if we all don’t give a shit.  This may not be rocket surgery as Kirby Roberts always says, but to us, it’s our life and love and most favorite thing to do.

Now go get ’em, tiger.


The Challenge of Lighting America’s Ballroom Challenge


A great article from Lighting and Sound America on the show America’s Ballroom Challenge, written by LD Chas Norton.  Most definitely read this great article — PDF link below.


PDF link:

Do YOU Behave Like A Professional Lighting Designer?


Back for another month of Lighting Insights, the video series with teeth!  It’s really taken off, and it’s nice to see that our industry cares enough to learn more to make itself better.  I’m so glad to have been a part of this awesome series…  I have more dreamed up for the future, let’s see how it goes!

This month’s episode:
Do YOU behave like a professional lighting designer?

InfoComm 2014 – Creative Booth Design for CHAUVET Professional

I am unbelievably lucky to be here where I am right now:

  • I work for a lighting company that is doing awesome stuff
  • I have a supportive boss and team
  • I have an incredible production crew that makes the design happen
  • I have a crew who values the programming time needed to rock and roll

Could I be any luckier?!  Mike Graham, Danilo Oliveira, Lucciano Cabrera, Anthony ChiapponeCarmen Diaz — you guys are my absolute heroes.  Thank you for making this one happen while I was ralfing my guts out.  You truly made this one great for me, it was like a gift showing up and being able to start mashing buttons.  Thank you, team.

Check out the “creative” design video we made for InfoComm 2014!

Check out some photos of the booth — we had a blast!















LDI 2013 in Photos

A fun show happened this year in Las Vegas — lots of beams, lots of friends, and I met my goal to share hug karma with 20 new people!

I’ve heard a few people now call LDI something like “LED-I.”  After making me giggle like a dumbass like I’m known to do, it’s not like it’s far off the mark — the industry is dominated with LED wash fixtures, LED pixel mappers, LED moving head spot AND wash fixtures, and all kinds of other diode-powered light makers.  Strobes, too — LED strobes are intensely appropriate, but they deliver a different kind of stab than a Xenon strobe.  They’re not better or worse, just different!  The industry still has the gamut of discharge, incandescent, and other non-LED sources as well, but there is less push generally on these types of fixtures.

I find that such an interesting paradigm at the LDI show – lots of companies have non-LED stuff and they show it, but there is  definitely a large LED offering in our industry (as is the case in most industries of light right now).  Sometimes I wonder if there are less non-LED beams bouncing around because that’s what the industry wants or if it’s because of the cost savings of NOT having those non-LED sources en masse.  Power is expensive stuff at these shows, and so is drayage on all of the heavy gack that goes along with larger draw 208 gear and dimming.  Most LEDs anymore allow you greater flexibility with 208V power too, making the power linking possibilities even better.  I only had one 48-way PD for the CHAUVET Professional booth, and that powered everything I had designed into the rig, video panels and all.

I programmed the booth I designed on the Avolites Sapphire Touch, which has become my new favorite desk.  I finally found an interface that was designed the way that my brain wants to program.  This has been a joyous time in my programmer life!  It’s nothing like the old Avolites way, they’ve made the flow so unbelievably amazing that it is literally a joy to program.  I just had it again on the Concert Lighting Master Classes this last week, but I’ll be writing a separate post about that this week.

Check out some photos from the show, and I was glad to see you if I saw you at this year’s show!  If I didn’t see you, I’m sorry — we’ll see each other next go round or soon, you know how this business goes!  I was bummed that I didn’t get to see the Fox family.  This show kept me busy, I barely made it out of the booth except for about an hour to walk the floor.

Click on any photo below for the larger images in an *awesome* light box!


WICKED Talks About Their Lighting Design and Light Plot


I randomly ran across this really awesome video of the WICKED team talking about their light plot, lighting design, and lighting design team.  Pretty cool!  Check it out below:

From the video page:

It takes 650 lighting fixtures and a talented team of theatre artists and technicians to light up the WICKED stage. Meet the crew that illuminates Elphaba and makes Glinda glow to tell Oz’s most bewitching story.


Vintage Power and Light: The Coolest Thing to Happen to Tungsten Since Edison!


If you’ve been to an architectural lighting, entertainment lighting, or decorative lighting trade show lately, you should notice an interesting trend:  the lack of attention to incandescent light sources.  The light emitting diode has overtaken the world, and like myself, I miss the days of the warm tungsten filament in a room, bathing everything in its reach with a wider spectrum of color than its LED counterparts.  Tungsten filaments, at least decoratively, have become the fine wine of our lighting generation – only those with the intelligence and artistic knowledge in using tungsten and other incandescent sources have continued to do so.  The rest of the world is convinced, at the behest of excellent marketing and often regardless of price, that LED illumination is not only the way of the future but also today’s only way to appropriately design lighting.

It’s a fact that in many applications, including modern high bay methodologies and architectural applications, LED light sources are winning hearts and minds over their higher-energy-consuming incandescent cousins.  Sooner than later we’re going to see higher output automated fixtures giving their HID counterparts a run for their money, too.  ETC’s LED Source Four ellipsoidal, Chauvet’s Ovation LED ellipsoidal, Altman Lighting’s ME3 ellipsoidal, and Robert Juliat’s Tibo and Zep LED profiles have taken the market by storm – and have begun pushing back on the use of tungsten-halogen sources, arc sources, and even halogen sources!

On the whole, energy costs when dealing with a large facility or venue are where LED and non-incandescent sources make a monster difference in energy costs.  But what about where energy costs are negligible, like in your home?  If saving comparatively a few dollars here and there in your home is less important than the feeling and artistic appreciation that something like an incandescent lamp brings to you, can you put a price on your happiness?  I’ve owned many a compact fluorescent lamp-based fixture in my home, and frankly I replace every single CFL with its halogen or incandescent counterpart.  It’s my decision, and I do what makes my eyes and my brain happy.

best of 24-u3215

On that thought, I introduce to you the work of Vintage Power and Light out of Austin, Texas – creator Lowell Fowler (of High End Systems fame) has started a new hobby art venture based on utilizing the beauty and intrigue of vintage lighting and electrical equipment tied with the warm glow of incandescent sources.  Even better than just the sexiness of a glowing filament structure, Vintage Power and Light takes the beauty of an Edison filament wrap source and melds it to gorgeous finished old-world wood components, then adds stunning copper and brass connections and controls.  My favorite parts of Vintage Power and Light’s work are their use of Consolidated Design glass insulators – there is nothing quite like a multi-petticoat glass insulator on a fixture with an artistic incandescent filament turning that glass into a mystical piece of glowing jewelry.  GAH!  This stuff is amazing!!!

best of 4-u3462

Lowell and York Fowler have put an interesting new spin on the idea of Steampunk-esque design by bringing old-world components and combining them with early 20th century incandescence.  The result is a stunning and refreshing take on using incandescence as not only an artistic statement, but a comfortable, familiar, and heartwarming addition to your house, office, or anywhere else that LEDs just don’t cut it.

Check out a series of gallery images below, click on any image for a light box of that gallery for your perusal!
Just make sure that you give credit where credit is due, and all of these photos are courtesy of Vintage Power and Light with photography by Tim Grivas.

First things first, Vintage Power and Light’s Table Lamps:

Vintage Power and Light’s Chandelier and Pendant series:

Got a Steampunk jones?  Vintage Power and Light does that too!

Last but not least, a gorgeous offering of sconces for your collection:





JimOnLight says HELL YES to Vintage Power and LightAwesome offerings, guys!  We hope that the whole world sees your work and loves it as much as we do!



High End Systems has released a series of training videos for the new Hog 4!



From a press release at High End Systems:

Following the extremely successful HOG4 launch and due to incredibly high demand, High End Systems is today releasing a series of Hog4 training videos.

In tandem with the large number of worldwide training classes undertaken both by High End Systems and it’s extensive distributor network, the initial 12 videos will allow everyone to learn how to use a Hog.

The videos have been split into easy to watch segments meaning that beginners as well as experienced users will benefit from them. They are also in a logical order allowing for the user to move from one element of the Hog software to another with ease. The 12 videos means that users who only need to look at a specific area of the console may do this with ease.

“The addition of these videos to our already extensive training program is testament to our commitment to offer education at multiple levels” says Jeff Pelzl, VP, Technical and Marketing Services “and we are committed to ensuring that everyone has access to Hog training.”

“We realized that not everyone is able to attend training classes and also that users want the ability to brush up on certain areas of the platform’ says Chris Ferrante, Director of Product Management “so we partnered with Colin Wood of Pre Production Services and now have a brilliant suite of training videos”

These videos can be seen at the following location:

As well as launching this suite of videos, High End Systems has recently launched version 1.2 for the Hog4 platform adding a host of new features including Command Keys, which continues the aggressive release schedule embarked upon on the platform’s launch.


The videos:

Lesson 1:  Starting a New Show

Lesson 2: Default Layout of a New Show

Lesson 3: An Introduction to Patching

Lesson 4: Basic Programming

Lesson 5: Cue Playback

Lesson 6: Using Palettes

Lesson 7: Basic Cue Timing and Editing

Lesson 8: Tracking

Lesson 9: User Kinds

Lesson 10: Command Keys

Lesson 11: Multi-Console Setup

Lesson 12: Configuring Art-Net

I hope to see more of these from MORE console manufacturers in the near future!!!

PHISH! New Video Clips of the Hampton Coliseum Reunion Shows from March 2009


I started digging my way through the 2 terabytes or so of uncut, backlogged video I have to process.  Behind every folder is something I have forgotten that I filmed, and I am uncovering some really fun stuff!

Here’s a handful of clips from when Greggity and I flew the famous mockingbird from Columbus, OH to Hampton, VA for the Phish reunion shows on March 6-8, 2009.  The clips I had sitting in a folder were, in order:

Army of One
Down with Disease JAM
Tweezer Reprise

Enjoy! Also check out Greg and I chatting with Chris Kuroda, Phish’s lighting designer, during the Hampton 2009 run, all four parts:

Part 1:

Part 2:

Part 3:

Part 4:

Ready?  Get your coffee, have a seat, and rock out!

PHISH! 2009 Hampton Coliseum Reunion Shows from! from Jim Hutchison on Vimeo.

Getting to Know the LED Ellipsoidal Generation – A JimOnLight Series Introduction


I’ve done a lot of shows in my career so far. I’m lucky as hell, don’t get me wrong – but because of it, I feel like I have a real “bond” with incandescent and high-intensity discharge lamps (HIDs) that we use in this industry. It’s almost creepy sometimes – in my head, I know how a good ol’ no-color Source Four looks in a dark theatre. I know how an Altman 360Q looks in a theatre sitting next to it, too – and how it looks sitting with a Shakespeare, also uncorrected, next to a Source Four. As I close my eyes to write this, I can see how an old Strand 30-degree feels inside of a theatre or outside during an outdoor performance, and how a tried-and-true PAR64 can burns so beautifully bright and amber when it’s going through red shift during a nice slow fade-up during a song in an arena. Even awesome old Kliegl 6×8’s have a good beam still, as long as the optics are changed from those miserable step lenses!

As a side note, I listened to Vesa Honkonen tell a story when I was attending graduate study in Sweden about “trusting” the light from a certain type of reflector, and how that trust cost him time and money on a project.  So as a bit of an aside, with every statement is an equal anti-statement!

I have gotten to know the fixtures in our industry very well because I’ve been fortunate to use them in a real variety of performance situations and installations. When you get to know something like an ellipsoidal fixture with an incandescent lamp in it and you use it over and over and over again, you get to trust the fixture.  I can say with ease that I trust the light that comes from the business end of a Source Four; at the same time, I trust the light that comes out of an Altman 360Q as well, whether it has an HX601 lamp in it or an old FEL lamp.  As a designer, as an artist — I know what that light from an incandescent lamp in one of the “typical” variety of ellipsoidals is going to do for me in a scene on actors of any skin tone, or on a presenter during, or on film and video, and whether it has a chunk of R26 or L181HT in it.  I know that kind of light.  I trust that light.

In the world we live in now, incandescent lamps are slowly becoming forcefully shunned by a growing portion of the lighting industries as a whole (and politicians, sadly), with LED replacements becoming the forced norm by pretty much all of the companies that at one time were pushing an incandescent based fixture.  These companies are all now driving quickly on the road of a really good trend: to produce a fixture that provides the same kind of light or better than that of an incandescent lamp based fixture with a lot less power consumption and without losing any light quality.  Sounds easy enough, right?

There is a strange, edgy, “new car smell” feeling towards the new strains of LED fixtures making their births into the industry.  We are inundated with them at the trade shows in our business, just like we were with the incandescent conventionals.  Manufacturers, this is perfectly acceptable, and I think that it’s one of your biggest assets in this industry.  It’s your job to make us trust your fixtures, through hands-on videos and “shoot-outs” between incandescent and LED fixtures out there.  My informal surveying of conference attendees over the last three years has seen many responses like “TOO MANY LEDS” and “If I see another crappy wannabe LED fixture at another trade show, I’m going to die.”  Believe it or not, this is a really good thing — it provides an opportunity for the exceptional equipment to rise to the top of the Diode Ocean, as I like to call it.  Lately, these exceptions are overcoming their inferior rivals, much to my happiness.

Users, we have a job to do, too — we have to give the manufacturers the chance to trust LED light.  We have to learn how it is different than its incandescent counterparts.  We’ve had all of these decades to learn how to work with incandescent light (and HID light too, for what it’s worth), and we know it.  We trust it, and we love it.  But why is that?  It’s because it’s what we know, and it really is that simple.  Once we give the LED ellipsoidal generation a chance, you know we’re going to trust that too.  This isn’t to say that LEDs are done developing, this obviously isn’t true.  But I am noticing some unbelievably incredible advances in LED engines and output technology lately, especially after LDI in October 2012, and I have to say that I am finally ready to learn to trust LED conventional ellipsoidals.  It’s hard not to at this point to see that LED ellipsoidals are becoming the obvious choice, with the color temperature tuning we see now and the low power requirement that they provide — and to argue against energy consumption and power conservation is just not in my DNA.

Over the next 2 weeks I’m going to be comparing the LED conventional ellipsoidals we see in Entertainment to their incandescent counterparts over the next month, starting with ETC’s new Source Four LED line first, followed by Robert Juliat’s Zep and Tibo ranges, then moving on to the RevEAL Profile from Prism Projection, and so on.  In the mean time, let’s take a look at the characteristics I’ll be examining that I find important to applying trust, at least on paper – you can argue that there are more to see, but for the sake of argument, let’s start with:

  • Cost Comparison:
    What kinds of costs are we looking at over the course of an LED Ellipsoidal lifetime?  How different is it, really?
  • Light Output, or Perceived Brightness:
    How does it compare to a comparable incandescent conventional?
  • Spectral Analysis:
    What is the white light in the beam comprised of with respect to wavelength?
  • Power Consumption:
    When you put an LED ellipsoidal up against an incandescent lamp at 575W, how does it perform?
  • Weight:
    I have to stick these in a truck and on a truss at some point, so what is the difference I need to know?
  • Controllable Properties:
    Obviously I have only a few with an incandescent fixture, so what comes stock in an LED ellipsoidal that makes a difference?

Let’s go on this journey together.  When we work on something together as an industry, we get to make it how we want it to be, and manufacturers listen.  Once we started to get involved with the ways that incandescent lamps were developed and lighting designers started demanding better control over design and engineering of incandescent lamps, they improved.  All we have to do now is learn what the LED Ellipsoidal generation can do for us, and we can really make a difference.