P&O Cruises Ship, The Pacific Pearl, is Twice as Amazing with Projections!

Vivid Sydney 2013 just wrapped up in Sydney, Australia – I mean like on the tenth of June wrapped up.  Vivid Sydney 2013 is a celebration of light around the Sydney Operahouse, and really all around the city!

This year, P&O Cruises took their beauty of a sea vessel, the Pacific Pearl, out for a spin with one small exception — projections all over the boat.  You have GOT to see this!

First, some video:

P&O Cruises – Vivid Sydney 2013 from Romina on Vimeo.

and:

Then, from Alice at MyModernMet, who was apparently in attendance for this amazing visual occasion and makes me very jealous, posted some awesome shots from photog Craig Jewell.  Peep these photos:

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Here’s the Pacific Pearl without any lumen interference:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/craigjewell/with/8853297151/

Flickr user FlashFlyGuy — http://www.flickr.com/photos/9028007@N05/5421600846/in/photostream/

Awesome.  Stay tuned for more from Vivid Sydney 2013! 

 

Bruce Munro Makes Nature Better with Light, Again

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World-renowned light artist Bruce Munro is back on the scene with an installation at Cheekwood Botanical Garden & Museum, Nashville, Tennessee – and once again, he’s taken some color, a smidge of light, and improved upon the night time viewing of life in the park.  When asked about his experience in the park, Bruce Munro had this to say:

‘during my first visit to cheekwood earlier in the year, I had a visceral reaction to the scale and positioning of the estate’s buildings. they are at one with the landscape, breeding a sense of understated balance and harmony that truly inspired me and undoubtedly permeates the visitor experience,’ said munro. ‘this is the most perfect place to exhibit because it provides a variety of opportunities to respond to – each space varies in both scale and topographical character. in addition, cheekwood’s world class exhibition galleries are a veritable jewel in its crown. I feel lucky and privileged to install my work at this prestigious and beautiful estate.’

What do you think?  Leave a comment on the post, tell the world what you think about this installation!

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The Cheekwood site has a lot of great information about the installation, including the what-and-wheres of the pieces.  From the Cheekwood website:

Mansion Lawn and surrounding gardens/Field of Light
At the center of the exhibition’s many installations will be the Field of Light, which submerges the viewer within a landscape of 20,000 lighted glass spheres, each rising from the ground on a slender stem.This is the largest Field of Light expanse Munro has ever created in a rolling landscape, and is designed to utilise the existing pathways in the garden to allow people to wander through it and view it from various different perspectives.

Materials: Frosted glass spheres, acrylic rods mounted on stakes, bare optic fiber, halogen light sources with hand-painted color wheels

Japanese Bamboo Garden/Fireflies

Hundreds of cool white Fireflies will be installed throughout the bamboo leading into Cheekwood’s Japanese garden, creating a magical space of illuminated springs amongst the bamboo.

Materials: Copper tube, brass stakes, acrylic polymer fiber optic cable

Japanese Garden Pavilion/Candlelight
Visitors will have just exited the bamboo garden and the Fireflies when they arrive at the pavilion in the Japanese Garden. Candlelight will introduce something architectural in form and warm in color temperature. Hundreds of flickering LED candle luminaires will make the pavilion become an illuminated stage.

Materials: Treated timber, stainless steel fixings, LED candle luminaires

Japanese Garden Dry Lake/Blue Moon
The dry lake within the Japanese garden is an intimate space, set in a valley of rounded hills. The Blue Moon is 5’ in diameter and will appear as a giant hovering moon of flickering icy blues.

Materials: Clear acrylic spheres and acrylic polymer fiber, stainless steel

Robertson Ellis Color Garden/Water-Towers
Water-Towers is comprised of 40 structures built out of one-litre recyclable plastic bottles filled with water, laser-cut wood layers, and fiber optics connected to an LED projector and sound system. This installation beckons visitors to immerse themselves in the spaces between the towers to explore the spectacle of light and sounds.

Materials: LEDs, fiber optics, new one-litre PET bottles, audio system

Mustard Meadow/Light Reservation
Light Reservation is an assembly of tipi-like structures made from spent fluorescent tubes on an expanse of Cheekwood’s lawn by the ponds.

Materials: Redundant 60w fluorescent tubes, 12v electric fence modules, polymer filters, polycarbonate tubes

Reflection Pool/Fagin’s Urchins
Fagin’s Urchins are a site-specific installation created for the formal reflection pool at Cheekwood. Sap green spheres are positioned centrally in a line close to the water’s surface across the reflection pool. By night the surface of each sphere becomes an illuminated Lilliputian world of the night.

Materials: Polycarbonate, acrylic polymer fiber optics, stainless steel

Cheekwood’s Mansion Loggia/ Light Shower
The double height of the iconic Loggia in the Cheekwood mansion offers a wonderful opportunity for Munro to create a site specific installation of the Light Shower, an installation of 1,650 teardrop-shaped diffusers suspended from the ceiling by fiber-optic strands.

Materials: Acrylic diffuser drops, powder-coated mild steel, acrylic polymer fiber

Cheekwood’s Mansion Rotunda Staircase/Bell Drop Chandelier
The stunning rotunda staircase in the Cheekwood mansion will be transformed with the beautiful Bell Drop Chandelier. A cascade of fiber optic cables terminates in a miniature conical brass bell shade approximately seven feet from the ground floor level.

Materials: Brass, powder-coated mild steel, acrylic polymer fiber optic

Cheekwood’s Museum of Art Galleries/Exhibition
A gallery in the Museum of Art will be dedicated to small-scale works and videos from Bruce Munro.

 

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Thanks, DesignBoom!

LEDs, Lady Gaga Smell-Well, and Projections at Nuit Blanche 2012

Did you go to Nuit Blanche 2012 in Toronto in October?  Laura and I did, and we took some photos that I’m just now able to get to after the trade show season.  I spoke with lots of people on the street at Nuit Blanche this year, and everyone seemed to have a great time — the only thing that was a bit hard to manage was the influx of people that were present downtown for this event.  There were some awesome exhibits and light installations — but anything interactive was pretty much mobbed with people and hard to really get a sense of the artists’ messages.  Regardless, it was a lot of fun!  Check out some photos below, and experience my entire trip with the photo gallery at the bottom!

There were some fun words at the top of this post that describe how f*cked up some of the Nuit Blanche-goers got, it’s worth a quick peek.  It’s totally true — lack of organization, and a real lack of general community.  Read the post.

As we walked by the Hudson’s Bay Company in Toronto we noticed this freaky storefront window scene that we had to stop and check out — and it was Lady Gaga’s perfume on display.  That’s some pretty crazy perfume marketing, huh!  I definitely liked the design enough to take photos…

Lady Gaga's Smellwell

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Apparently this perfume makes you smell like a psycho mad scientist:

Lady Gaga Does Window Displays

Oh, officially of course Lady Gaga had nothing to do with Nuit Blanche, but her display was part of MY Nuit Blanche, so that’s why it’s here!

Something that we saw but didn’t really get a chance to experience was Beam of Underground Sun by Arezoo Talebzadeh and Kaveh Ashourinia — ostensibly, they had taken some very bright LED sources and put them down under the street at several meters down.  Arezoo and Kaveh also added some powerful fans and some silk cloth under the street to give the effect of waves of light being cast up through the grate they chose in the street.  Check this one out, it is beautiful, especially with the photos of no people around it:

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This, however, is what the real Nuit Blanche Beam of Underground Sun experience was, which was different than intended I assume but had its own jua de vive, if you will:

It was still beautiful, just mobbed with people standing directly in the way of the beam and the overall everything of the piece.

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You can kind of see down into the shaft with the fan, the fabric, and the LED units:

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It was pretty cool to be standing in an intersection of Bloor Street with no one trying to honk at me or run me down!

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Probably one of the coolest things I saw this year at Nuit Blanche was the installation called Planes by Tricia Brown Dance Company — and it was awesome!

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…and behind the walls you can see a little behind-the-scenes action!  I almost didn’t want to see this — the movement of the dancers and the projections themselves were so riveting that seeing the how-to took away from it for me.  Ah, the life of making mystery for the audience!

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Check out the Gallery View below of the Nuit Blanche event in Toronto — and check out the official Scotiabank page on Nuit Blanche so you can see the intended (and actual) views of the art from this year’s show!

Late Night Excellent: Rain Room at The Barbican, 2012

This is absolutely great.  Before I say sh*t, watch this:

Rain Room at the Barbican, 2012 from rAndom International on Vimeo.

OK, no, wait, watch another video, it’s late anyway:

GAH!  This is too awesome!

First and foremost, THIS IS STILL GOING ON at the Barbican Gallery, and WILL BE until MARCH 3, 2013.  SO, this means you need to get out there and see it!  If you live in the London metro or are going to be there between now and March 3, 2013, you need to check this out.  Go to the Barbican Gallery visitor’s page and get some info on the what, when, where, how, by clicking here!

Rain Room was created by rAndom International –

From the Barbican Gallery’s page on rAndom International‘s Rain Room exhibit:

Random International invites you to experience what it’s like to control the rain. Visitors can choose to simply watch the spectacle or find their way carefully through the rain, putting their trust in the work to the test.

More than the technical virtuosity necessary for its success, the piece relies on a sculptural rigour, with the entire Curve transformed by the monumental proportions of this carefully choreographed downpour and the sound of water.

Random International are known for their distinctive approach to digital-based contemporary art. Their experimental artworks come alive through audience interaction and staged performance.

Random International are represented by Carpenters Workshop Gallery, London and Paris.

In order for visitors to enjoy the sensory experience of Rain Room, there is a limited capacity of 5 people at a time in the rain.

Please be aware that due to the popularity of Rain Room, the queue time currently stands at around two hours, at peak times including evenings and weekends up to three hours.

We advise visitors to arrive as early in the day as possible, a minimum of two hours before closing time. Entry to the queue is subject to the number of visitors already waiting. Anyone arriving later may not be allowed to join the queue as we are unable to admit visitors after the gallery closes. Thank you for your patience.

Sun 18 Nov, 2 Dec, 20 Jan, 24 Feb
12-5pm, The Curve
Wayne McGregor Random Dance, with a score by Max Richter

Experience a unique fusion of art and movement on four Sundays during the exhibition as dancers respond to Rain Room.

Admission is free and will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis from the queue. Please arrive early to allow for long queues due to a very limited capacity inside the Curve.

I also think this text from rAndom International’s website on Rain Room is pretty awesome too — but please check out the rAndom International website, it is absolutely a eye-stroking experience!

Water, injection moulded tiles, solenoid valves, pressure regulators, custom software, 3D tracking cameras, wooden frames, steel beams, hydraulic management system, grated floor 

Rain Room has been made possible through the generous support of the Maxine and Stuart Frankel Foundation for Art.

Video by Gramafilm, music by Max Richter

Rain Room is a hundred square metre field of falling water through which it is possible to walk, trusting that a path can be navigated, without being drenched in the process.

As you progress through The Curve, the sound of water and a suggestion of moisture fill the air, before you are confronted by this carefully choreographed downpour that responds to your movements and presence.

* PS I LOVE THIS! 

All of these images are directly from the rAndom International website, and I thank them for it!

Chris Fraser Has A Brilliant Mind

There is something about light emanating through a slit in a surface that just blows my mind.  As suggestive as that comment is, I ensure you it is not meant for that kind of thought, even though I know about half of you out there immediately went there.  What you’re seeing above is the genius of Chris Fraser, a light artist from San Francisco.  His work is definitely pretty awesome — this particular case above is a “line drawing” of his from Oakland, CA.  The one below is called Points, Lines, Planes from the Performance Art Institute:

Chris’ work is like a crazy slit spectroscope of whatever light source is in front of it — like in these below, he did them as on-site pieces of work, creating something magical at a given day and time, never repeatable again.  You have to see more of Chris’ work:

Excellent, and beautiful.  I have got to see some of this stuff up-close and personal.

PLEASE check out Chris Fraser’s portfolio site and his Experiments on Flickr — VERY cool stuff!

This is my Chris Fraser-esque work for the day, a la 2007:

light leaking through the main rag...

Thanks to Lost in e Minor and We Waste Time!

Vaseline Glass Chandeliers: A Response to Fukushima Daiichi

Some people call it Uranium Glass, insiders call it Vaseline Glass because its color and internal sheen resembles Vasoline as it was made around the 1930’s.  The long and short of it is that it’s glass doped with Uranium, fluoresces under ultraviolet wavelengths, and it is absolutely beautiful.  Check it out:

Vaseline Glass is some lovely, lovely stuff, isn’t it?  Just to show its awesomeness, let’s look at a piece from the Depression era, lit with long wave UV:

Most evidences of this glass come from between the mid-to-late-1700’s to current manufacturing, and yeah, it’s literally made with uranium, the radioactive element that we all have heard of in some form or fashion.  There are instances of this glass being located in a mosaic containing yellow glass with 1% uranium oxide found in a Roman villa, and the guy who discovered Uranium, Martin Klaproth, who was apparently also using the newly discovered element as a glass colorant.

That green color is eerie, yeah?  or as the Canadians say, “eh?”

Two artists took that idea of Uranium-doped glass and turned it into a statement on the horrific Fukushima-Daiichi disaster.  Meet Ken and Julia Yonetani‘s work, named Crystal Palace: The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nuclear Nations.  They took metal wire, Uranium glass, and some UV lighting and created twenty-nine chandeliers representing the twenty-nine nations using nuclear power.  Check it out:

From Ken and Julia’s website on the work:

In direct response to Japan’s 2011 horrific Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident and the phenomenon of leaking radiation, Crystal Palace: The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nuclear Nations comprises an installation of chandeliers made from vintage Uranium glass beads alongside glowing text based works made from vintage Uranium glass tubing shaped into words such as – ‘radioactive’, ‘meltdown’ and ‘electric dreams’.

Chandeliers are not only an item of luxury, but also an extravagant emblem of the beauty of electricity and the seductiveness of consumerism.The artists have reconfigured them to emanate UV light instead of standard light, and decorated them with specially sourced Uranium glass in place of traditional crystals.

“You can’t see, smell or perceive radiation with your senses, but it becomes visible in our works when illuminated with ultraviolet lights,” says Julia Yonetani. “Presented in darkness, the glass chandeliers and tubes glow with an eerie bright green light indicating the presence of radiation. We hope to prompt viewers to react in their own way to this radioactive presence.”

Commonly used in the 19th and early 20th centuries for sugar bowls, cake stands and other decorative objects, Uranium glass contains very small traces of Uranium within the glass, is legal and poses no health risks.

Crystal Palace references London’s Great Exhibition of 1851, which was intended as a platform to celebrate both modern technology and to enhance Great Britain’s role as a leading industrial nation of the time.

“The chandeliers in Crystal Palace represent the USA, Japan, Germany, Finland, France and various other countries. For the complete body of work we will ultimately make a total of 29 chandeliers, which represent each of the countries that operate nuclear power stations today,” says Ken Yonetani.

“The size of each chandelier correlates to the scale of each country’s nuclear output, with the chandelier representing the USA being the largest at 1.6m in diameter and 2m high.”

“My family lives in Tokyo, quite close to where the disaster happened,” he adds. “At the time of the tsunami, Japan had 54 operating nuclear reactors, relying on them for 30% its total electric power. The Fukushima accident shows Japan’s complacency around nuclear power and radiation and also asks questions of Australians, because Australia is the number one exporter of Uranium to Japan.”

That’s a heck of a statement, and Crystal Palace is one heck of an exhibit.  Ken and Julia’s work will be playing at the Artereal Gallery in Sydney, Australia from October 3 to November 4, 2012.  Check it out if you’re there, this has to be awesome!

Ken and Julia Yonetani:

Thanks 1st Glass, Spoon and Tamago, United NuclearWe Waste Time, and Wikipedia!

Luminous Field – A Projected Reality in Chicago

You might have been to Chicago, and you might have seen Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate.  But you’ve never seen Cloud Gate in Chicago like this before…

Luftwerk is the firm who designed and coordinated this work — a husband/wife team of Sean Gallero and Petra Bachmaier.  From Frame Mag’s website:

Luminous Field comprises of 10 video projectors mounted on four towers; the projectors are pointed onto and below Cloud Gate, a giant bean-shaped sculpture built by Anish Kapoor in 2006. 

A series of 5-minute-long video shows play on a loop, covering the sculpture and its surrounding territory (about 25-by-9m). Videos range from a funky disco dance floor to colourful geometric patterns.

‘We really perceive it as something that people can interact with,’ says Petra Bachmaier, who forms Luftwerk alongside husband Sean Gallero. ‘We really want people to go in and play with it. Like the whole concept of the video, we built it for people to move with the light.’

The result is a virtual ‘playground’ for people to follow and engage with light. Meanwhile, a special music soundtrack plays, as composed by Owen Clayton Condon of Chicago’s Third Coast Percussion.

From Luftwerk’s website:

Inspired and informed by Italian floor mosaics, the urban grid, pedestrian crosswalks and geometric tessellations.

“If anything could possibly top the interactive experience of Anish Kapoor’s monumental Cloud Gate sculpture in Millennium Park – then this could be it. This stunning site-specific video and sound installation brought more than 65,000 Chicagoans and out-of-town visitors to the Park over a ten day period in the middle of the winter. Luminous Field by Luftwerk became a viral sensation and photos of the beautiful lights and geometrical forms that enveloped ‘the Bean’ were seen throughout the world.” – Dorothy Coyle, Executive Director – Chicago Office of Tourism and Culture

“Playground” projection field dimension 80′ by 30′ consisting of 384 tiles, underneath projection reflecting within the sculpture.

This piece of mastery of light closed February 20 — but if you saw it, please drop a comment below and give me the skinny!

A 4D Theme Park?! Oh Yes.

It’s too bad we can’t buy tickets to one of THESE kind of parks at the gas station like you can places like King’s Island and Six Flags Over, uh, Wherever:

Whoa!

This place is called Live Park, and it was on some kind of a “world tour” for three months in South Korea recently:

Live Park was created by a firm called d’Strict — who has some pretty huge projects under their belt, check them out!

 

Yvette Mattern’s Global Rainbow

Alright, so Fox posted about this yesterday, but I had to know more.  I mean, this is Rick Hutton crazy laser sh*t here!  Remember this?

Alright, now check THIS out!

That, my friends, is Yvette Mattern’s installation, Global Rainbow, that is on display in the night time sky until March 4 in the UK.  Yvette took seven parallel laser beams, one of each color of our pal Roy (G. Biv of course), and blasted them across the sky.  The images are stunning.  You must see this exhibition, because it is freaking outstanding.

Check out some pics, courtesy of the BBC.  Also, check out a bunch more pics at Yvette’s Flickr, and then take a moment and read Yvette’s blog!  She’s all over the web!

LASER WIN:

55,000 LEDs Make A Cathedral

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Jeff Waful initially posted this on Twitter from Colossal Design, but I can’t not repost.  This thing is spectacular, even the pictures make it look like it was a spiritual sight.

First, check out this quick video of the cathedral – this entire thing was for the 2012 Lichtfestival in Ghent, Belgium.  The cathedral kinda stole the show, dontchathink?

That thing is UNBELIEVABLE!

it’s just…  captivating.  I don’t know what else to say about it.  SHOULD HAVE…  SENT A…  A POET…

There is an unbelievable set of photos of the 2102 Lichtfestival on DJ.271’s Flickr album.  I highly recommend checking that out!