LEDs, Guys in the Snow, in the Dark, Not Porn.

Ok, I want to do this.  Wait, it’s 70 outside and the ocean breeze is outstanding.  Suck on THAT, Midwest!

I kid!

Watch:

WOO Productions made this.  WOO Productions has some pretty awesome projects under their belt, you should go over there and check out their catalogue of work.  BUT NOT RIGHT THIS SECOND, WAIT DAMMIT!

From the video:

Two Mountainbikers, fully equipped with a lot of LED’s, enlighten the trails as they ride in the dark.

There are so many action sports videos on the internet nowadays that it’s hard to mix things up. Pretty much everything has already been done by someone else. This concept has left us wanting to create something innovative for quite a while now. We just didn’t have the “big idea” until we talked to Phillippe. After a day of testing with the aerial drone in 2012 the actual plan was to produce a “normal” Enduro or Trailbiking video with WOOProductions this year. It all turned out a little differently, though. The filming for the Enduro video never happened, but we ended up getting this idea for a completely different project. Phillippe, the founder of WOOProductions, came up with the idea of using LED lights for a video- a lot of them. At a meeting he explained his concept or at least he tried to, as it was quite a complex idea. It was hard for us to imagine the outcome but we almost had to give it a try due to how intrigued he was with the idea. The goal was never to document a day in the life kind of thing or produce a video with logical content. We would definitely not go for a normal ride at night with hundreds of little lights spread all over our bikes and bodies while still not seeing anything. We just wanted to create something different that looked cool for your and our entertainment- simple as that.

How I should have started this article was something like “Do you want to see some outstanding light art in the snow with LEDs glowing on bicycles?

Nah.  Too tame.

Light-Trails-Teaser

Awesome Nerditude: GE Engineer Nick Holonyak Talks about Inventing LEDs

nick_holonyak

Get ready for some historical awesomesauce — here’s Nick Holonyak, the GE engineer who invented LEDs, waxing poetic about the process, times, and history of the process of inventing light emitting diodes.  This is an awesome 3 minutes!

From an article at GE Lighting:

Holonyak got his PhD in 1954. In 1957, after a year at Bell Labs and a two year stint in the Army, he joined GE’s research lab in Syracuse, New York. GE was already exploring semiconductor applications and building the forerunners of modern diodes called thyristors and rectifiers. At a GE lab in Schenectady, the scientist Robert Hall was trying to build the first diode laser. Hall, Holonyak and others noticed that semiconductors emit radiation, including visible light, when electricity flows through them. Holonyak and Hall were trying to “turn them on,” and channel, focus and multiply the light.

Hall was the first to succeed. He built the world’s first semiconductor laser. Without it, there would be no CD and DVD players today. “Nobody knew how to turn the semiconductor into the laser,” Holonyak says. “We arrived at the answer before anyone else.”

But Hall’s laser emitted only invisible, infrared light. Holonyak spent more time in his lab, testing, cutting and polishing his hand-made semiconducting alloys. In the fall of 1962, he got first light. “People thought that alloys were rough and turgid and lumpy,” he says. “We knew damn well what happened and that we had a very powerful way of converting electrical current directly into light. We had the ultimate lamp.”

Holonyak left GE in 1963 and started teaching at his alma mater, the University of Illinois. Today he is the John Bardeen professor of electrical and computer engineering and physics. He’s collected dozens of top prizes for his work, including the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, theLemelson-MIT Prize, and membership in the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

The red LED “was just the beginning,” he says. “I knew that it was a very powerful thing and that these materials will become a source of white light. I thought it might be a decade. Little did I realize that it would take much longer than that.”

I freaking love Science.

The Daily Lamp: Rich Brilliant Willing’s Monocle Lamp, Which Keeps an Eye on Everything

I’m hoping I’m not overselling this one, but I think the design is tight.  This is called Monocle, from design firm Rich Brilliant Willing.  It doesn’t look like much, but I think this product is outstanding — that’s why it made the Daily Lamp!

Monocle has two diffusing options — a flat diffuser that (I assume) spreads a little less than the dome diffuser, below:

Flat diffuser:

monocle-flat-lens-1

Dome diffuser:

monocle-dome-lens

 

Both Monocle styles are warm white LED, around 2700 Kelvin, and run around $425 USD.  That’s quite a jump up in price from your typical $10 Lowes or Home Depot styled monocle-esque fixtures, isn’t it…

monocle-lamp-1

monocle-lamp-2

monocle-lamp-3

monocle-lamp-4

monocle-lamp-5

monocle-lamp-6

 

About the Monocle lamp, from Rich Brilliant Willing:

With one eye on his subject, Monocle provides a strong yet warm beam of LED powered light. This rotating surface mounted fixture has been shaped from milled aluminum, resulting in a smooth and clean product perfect for any space where warm directional light is needed. In order to augment your view, Monocle enjoys placement above your shoulder or head..

Materials

Milled aluminum, braided cord

Specification

LED, warm white
2700K, 95 CRI
100-120V Input 60Hz
13W Power Consumption

Dimensions

5.25″ Dia. x 4″ Depth
133mm Dia x 101mm Depth
I just love this little guy!

 

monocle-lamp-7

monocle-flat-lens-1

monocle-lamp-9

monocle-lamp-8

Thanks to Rich Brilliant Willing for the greyish images, and DeZeen for the rest!

 

The Daily Lamp: Terrence Seah’s Cloudline Lamp – Sleek, Slim Uplight

Today’s Daily Lamp is a really minimalist but inventive take on uplighting in the home. Meet Terrence Seah’s Cloudline Lamp — a true uplighter with a sleek design and nice lines:

cloudline_03

cloudline_02

 

Cloudline, designed by Terrence Seah for seller Livdin, comes in white and red, and both are $239 bucks.  From the Livdin page on the Cloudline:

Enhance your room with warm diffuse light and set the mood with touch-sensitive dimming. The Cloudline lamp is simple to wall-mount, and takes up no floor space. Pleasing illumination in an equally pleasing package.

FEATURES

  • Bright light equivalent to a 60W incandescent light bulb
  • Energy efficient 13W power consumption
  • Long lasting 20-year lifespan LED bulb
  • Aluminum construction with glossy powder-coated finish
  • Oiled walnut accent
  • Long braided power cord

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Lamp, 21.5″(L) x 2″(W) x 3.25″(H)
  • Dimmer Switch, 5.5″(L) x 1.75″(W) x 0.75″(H)
  • Power Cord, 6′ plug-to-switch, 8′ switch-to-lamp

It sure is beautiful!  Can you imagine five or six of these around a large room?

cloudline_05

cloudline_06

cloudline_01

cloudline_04

 Thanks, Uwofo!

Bruce Munro Makes Nature Better with Light, Again

bruce-munro-cheekwood

World-renowned light artist Bruce Munro is back on the scene with an installation at Cheekwood Botanical Garden & Museum, Nashville, Tennessee – and once again, he’s taken some color, a smidge of light, and improved upon the night time viewing of life in the park.  When asked about his experience in the park, Bruce Munro had this to say:

‘during my first visit to cheekwood earlier in the year, I had a visceral reaction to the scale and positioning of the estate’s buildings. they are at one with the landscape, breeding a sense of understated balance and harmony that truly inspired me and undoubtedly permeates the visitor experience,’ said munro. ‘this is the most perfect place to exhibit because it provides a variety of opportunities to respond to – each space varies in both scale and topographical character. in addition, cheekwood’s world class exhibition galleries are a veritable jewel in its crown. I feel lucky and privileged to install my work at this prestigious and beautiful estate.’

What do you think?  Leave a comment on the post, tell the world what you think about this installation!

Bruce_Munro_cheekwood_colors

bruce-munro-at-cheekwood-01

bruce-munro-at-cheekwood-04

bruce-munro-at-cheekwood-02

The Cheekwood site has a lot of great information about the installation, including the what-and-wheres of the pieces.  From the Cheekwood website:

Mansion Lawn and surrounding gardens/Field of Light
At the center of the exhibition’s many installations will be the Field of Light, which submerges the viewer within a landscape of 20,000 lighted glass spheres, each rising from the ground on a slender stem.This is the largest Field of Light expanse Munro has ever created in a rolling landscape, and is designed to utilise the existing pathways in the garden to allow people to wander through it and view it from various different perspectives.

Materials: Frosted glass spheres, acrylic rods mounted on stakes, bare optic fiber, halogen light sources with hand-painted color wheels

Japanese Bamboo Garden/Fireflies

Hundreds of cool white Fireflies will be installed throughout the bamboo leading into Cheekwood’s Japanese garden, creating a magical space of illuminated springs amongst the bamboo.

Materials: Copper tube, brass stakes, acrylic polymer fiber optic cable

Japanese Garden Pavilion/Candlelight
Visitors will have just exited the bamboo garden and the Fireflies when they arrive at the pavilion in the Japanese Garden. Candlelight will introduce something architectural in form and warm in color temperature. Hundreds of flickering LED candle luminaires will make the pavilion become an illuminated stage.

Materials: Treated timber, stainless steel fixings, LED candle luminaires

Japanese Garden Dry Lake/Blue Moon
The dry lake within the Japanese garden is an intimate space, set in a valley of rounded hills. The Blue Moon is 5’ in diameter and will appear as a giant hovering moon of flickering icy blues.

Materials: Clear acrylic spheres and acrylic polymer fiber, stainless steel

Robertson Ellis Color Garden/Water-Towers
Water-Towers is comprised of 40 structures built out of one-litre recyclable plastic bottles filled with water, laser-cut wood layers, and fiber optics connected to an LED projector and sound system. This installation beckons visitors to immerse themselves in the spaces between the towers to explore the spectacle of light and sounds.

Materials: LEDs, fiber optics, new one-litre PET bottles, audio system

Mustard Meadow/Light Reservation
Light Reservation is an assembly of tipi-like structures made from spent fluorescent tubes on an expanse of Cheekwood’s lawn by the ponds.

Materials: Redundant 60w fluorescent tubes, 12v electric fence modules, polymer filters, polycarbonate tubes

Reflection Pool/Fagin’s Urchins
Fagin’s Urchins are a site-specific installation created for the formal reflection pool at Cheekwood. Sap green spheres are positioned centrally in a line close to the water’s surface across the reflection pool. By night the surface of each sphere becomes an illuminated Lilliputian world of the night.

Materials: Polycarbonate, acrylic polymer fiber optics, stainless steel

Cheekwood’s Mansion Loggia/ Light Shower
The double height of the iconic Loggia in the Cheekwood mansion offers a wonderful opportunity for Munro to create a site specific installation of the Light Shower, an installation of 1,650 teardrop-shaped diffusers suspended from the ceiling by fiber-optic strands.

Materials: Acrylic diffuser drops, powder-coated mild steel, acrylic polymer fiber

Cheekwood’s Mansion Rotunda Staircase/Bell Drop Chandelier
The stunning rotunda staircase in the Cheekwood mansion will be transformed with the beautiful Bell Drop Chandelier. A cascade of fiber optic cables terminates in a miniature conical brass bell shade approximately seven feet from the ground floor level.

Materials: Brass, powder-coated mild steel, acrylic polymer fiber optic

Cheekwood’s Museum of Art Galleries/Exhibition
A gallery in the Museum of Art will be dedicated to small-scale works and videos from Bruce Munro.

 

bruce-munro-at-cheekwood-03

bruce-munro-at-cheekwood-08

bruce-munro-at-cheekwood-06

bruce-munro-at-cheekwood-07

bruce-munro-at-cheekwood-05

Thanks, DesignBoom!

The Daily Lamp – It’s Only A Paper Moon!

Really now, all you need is an element, some paper, and a clip.  What happens then is called It’s Only A Paper Moon from London-based designer Kazuhiro Yamanaka.  Like so:

its-only-a-paper-moon-kazuhiro-yamanaka-2

its-only-a-paper-moon-kazuhiro-yamanaka-3

its-only-a-paper-moon-kazuhiro-yamanaka-1

For the ultra-low-materialists out there, It’s Only A Paper Moon is pretty much nothing but a chunk of paper, a clamp base with a lead, and light source.  And, in case you were wondering, yes you can use your own paper:

The lamp simply consists of only three elements, a wooden peg, a piece of paper and a light bulb. A fan shaped paper can be rolled up to be clipped by the large peg to wrap around the bulb. Any type of paper, different colors, shapes, can be used for showing distinct appearances with different lighting effects. The lamp is carefully designed in order to balance the weight.

For all of you Saturday readers out there, here’s another version on the paper lamp from Kazuhiro, a paper tube with an LED inside, attached to the inside.  Clever?  Simple, that’s for sure!

kazuhiro-yamanaka-paper-led-torch-light-1

kazuhiro-yamanaka-paper-led-torch-light-2

kazuhiro-yamanaka-paper-led-torch-light-3

kazuhiro-yamanaka-paper-led-torch-light-4

Thanks, DesignBoom!

The Daily Lamp – The Peel Light, from Naoki Ono and Yuki Yamamoto

Today’s Daily Lamp rocks harder than others I almost picked for today.  Meet the Peel Light from Japanese designers Naoki Ono and Yuki Yamamoto:

yoy-jp-peel-2

From Naoki Ono’s product page on the Peel Light:

A wall light that looks as if a corner of a wall were peeling and light was leaking therefrom. OLED is used to make the light source as thin as possible and the electric cable is let to stay along a corner of walls so that it doesn’t stand out. It can be fixed to the wall with a hook.

Category : Wall light
Material : OLED, PMMA
Dimensions : H430 W335 D63 mm
Year : 2012

I love this thing!  Now I want one in all four corners of my studio, each with independent color control and intensity!

yoy-jp-peel-3

yoy-jp-peel-4

yoy-jp-peel-1

Therefrom indeed.  Therefrom indeed.

Friday Facts – 20 Really Awesome Facts about LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes) Everyone Should Know

LED_family

20 facts on LEDs?!  Jim, are you CRAZY?  I just might be!  With the new Daily Lamp series and the upcoming JimOnLightTV, I’m all about having regular series spots on JimOnLight!  Let’s call it Friday Facts!

Happy Friday everyone — I am going absolutely LED nuts around here lately, as I’ve replaced most of the incandescent lamps in our house with their LED A-lamp equivalents.  Surprisingly enough, I haven’t lost my hair, found the need to eat bugs, or lost any sleep because of screwed-up circadian rhythms, as some claim are side-effects of LED A-lamps.  Ask my wife, it really annoys me when people claim false facts, like Fox News.  Oh, that burns me brighter than an Alpha 18K in Dallas in the summer!

Friday Facts time!  25 Really Awesome Facts about LEDs, or Light-Emitting Diodes!

  1. When LED light is used in delicatessen displays and in places with fresh food, it has been proven to breed significantly less bacteria than their halogen or fluorescent counterparts.  Consider that next time you’re getting stuff for sandwiches!  I would say that significantly NO bacteria is the right amount for my sandwiches!
  2. Remember the name Nick Holonyak, Jr. – he is the father of the visible light LED.  Nick invented the LED while working for General Electric in 1962.  This “new thing” that’s come onto the retail market over the last 5 years has been around since the mid-1960s!
  3. Next time you see a blue LED, think of Shuji Nakamura, the inventor of the blue LED, back in 1994.  Nakamura, who was working for Nichia Corporation at the time, got a $200 bonus for his discovery – while Nichia made more money than is in Scrooge McDuck’s swimming pool!  Nakamura never signed a non-disclosure for Nichia, and in 2001 he sued  for $189 million.  The Japanese courts awarded him more money than any other Japanese company ever had to pay in court:  $8.1 million.  So the inventor of the blue LED got $8,100,200 for his invention that we all use everywhere!
  4. Most blue and green LEDs use a mixture of Gallium Nitride and Indium Nitride to get the blue, called Indium Gallium Nitride (InGaN).  By varying the amount of Indium in the mix, the color of blue varies.
  5. Most red, orange, and yellow LEDs use variants of Gallium Phosphide (GaP) Gallium Arsenide Phosphide (GaAsP) to get their hues.
  6. White LEDs work quite like fluorescent lamps work with respect to color; a blue or ultraviolet LED is coated with a phosphor that emits photons from the ultraviolet frequencies when the LED is energized.
  7. The Monsanto Corporation was the first company to mass-produce red LEDs for the industry, mostly as replacement lights for indicators and seven-segment displays.
  8. An incandescent lamp converts about 9-10% of the energy fed to it into light, whereas LEDs convert nearly 100% of the energy they consume as light.
  9. The lighting industries as a whole are pushing LEDs to replace incandescent sources in a variety of applications, but the first time that LEDs actually did displace incandescent lamps was in vehicle brake lights, signal lights, and traffic lightsback in 1987!
  10. If the entire United States would replace only 50% of the existing incandescent Christmas lights around the holidays, the potential energy cost savings starts around $17.2 billion dollars.
  11. Heat generated by an LED source is a real enemy to the quality of that LED source.  LEDs are subject to the cooling method designed into the lamp or fixture — if the cooling is good, the LED will maintain a decent output over its lamp life.  If the cooling is poor, the lamp is subject to considerably higher lumen depreciation over its lifetime, or even total failure over time.
  12. If you’ve ever had a porch, you’ve had a porch light, and you’ve had bugs all over that porch light.  Switch to LED in the porch light and you’ll notice considerably fewer bugs, if not a complete decrease in your porch bug population!  Why, do you ask?  It’s because incandescent lamps and CFLs produce copious amounts of ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) radiation, which bugs love more than Kim Kardashian loves mascara!
  13. LED headlights might be one of the most annoying, blinding things on the road, but they’re actually quite safe for driving – LED headlights render colors you see in their beams better, which gives you better awareness of your surroundings on the road.  They’re totally worth it!
  14. Due to the physics involved, LED lamps have what we call Instant On — unlike their incandescent and compact fluorescent (CFL) counterparts.  What this means is that you can switch an LED lamp on and you get the full brightness of that light instantly.  Think about this next time you need to place a lamp in a part of your house or office that gets turned on and off frequently — incandescent lamps and CFLs experience significantly less lamp life from being switched on and off frequently, and CFLs in particular can experience greatly reduced lamp life if they are switched off and back on within 15 minutes of heating up!
  15. Most LED A-lamp replacement bulbs are relatively cool to the touch, whereas their incandescent and halogen counterparts will most definitely leave you with a first or second degree burn.  Maximum operating temperature for most residential A-lamp type bulbs is around 135-140 degrees Fahrenheit, where halogen lamps run around 600-700 F to the touch and their incandescent cousins run around 375-400 F to the touchOUCH!
  16. If you think about incandescent lamp life (around 1000 hours) and compact fluorescent lamp life (around 10,000 hours),  It’s not hard to see how LEDs are making the grade in retail markets.  A majority of residential/commercial LED A-lamp manufacturers claim a whopping 50,000 hours lamp life on average, with newer models claiming up to 100,000 hours.  If this sounds impressive, it is!  Consider your usage on just the 50,000 hour varieties:
    If you use your LED bulb for 24 hours a day, every day, that bulb is rated to last 6 solid years!
    If you use your LED bulb for 8 hours a day, every day, that bulb is rated to last 17 years!!
    If you use your LED bulb for only 4 hours per day, that bulb is rated to last 17 years!!!
  17. LEDs contain NO MERCURY at all — and over 95% of an LED is recyclable.  Compare this to the wasteful design of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), which not only contain Mercury, but also create a large portion of electronic waste due to their design — the fluorescent tube portion of a CFL ceases to work long before the ballast inside the CFL or its other electronic components are ready to die.  This alone creates tons of waste every month.
  18. LED lamps on average are not subject to serious damage from external shock – which translates into “oops, I dropped my LED lamp onto the floor while I was changing it!”  If you try this with an incandescent lamp, you’re going to be cleaning up glass at least — and if it’s a CFL, not only will it break, but you will also need to follow Mercury decontamination procedures recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency.  Yikes!
  19. The U.S. Department of Energy estimates that the widespread adoption of LEDs in residential and commercial applications over the next 20 years will save about $265 billion, prevent the need for constructing 40 new power plants, and reduce the electricity demand of lighting by 33 percent.
  20. Ever wonder why non-chip form LEDs have that little plastic bubble (or lens) around them, like in the picture at the top of the post?  It actually has three distinct functions, and the process of adding the diode to the plastic is called potting:
    * The plastic protects the tiny wires and components that make up the diode from physical damage, and protects the diode from open air
    * The plastic makes mounting the LED inside of devices and equipment considerably easier
    * That plastic lens allows the light from the LED to have a variety of properties, like different beam angles and diffusions

led-diagram1.jpg

The Daily Lamp – SplitLamp, from Predrag Vujanovic

splitlamp-by-predrag-vujanovic4

Today’s Daily Lamp is a pretty cool concept lamp called SplitLamp from designer Predrag Vujanovic — this design is really cool to me, as it alleviates the problem of only having one source on your desk.  Often times I find myself needing a second angle to take the shadow or contrast away from something I’m working on, and Predrag’s SplitLamp is quite the design for just that!

splitlamp-by-predrag-vujanovic2

splitlamp-by-predrag-vujanovic1

splitlamp-by-predrag-vujanovic5

splitlamp-by-predrag-vujanovic3

Thanks Yanko and Crosby Press!

Getting to Know the LED Ellipsoidal Generation – A JimOnLight Series Introduction

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I’ve done a lot of shows in my career so far. I’m lucky as hell, don’t get me wrong – but because of it, I feel like I have a real “bond” with incandescent and high-intensity discharge lamps (HIDs) that we use in this industry. It’s almost creepy sometimes – in my head, I know how a good ol’ no-color Source Four looks in a dark theatre. I know how an Altman 360Q looks in a theatre sitting next to it, too – and how it looks sitting with a Shakespeare, also uncorrected, next to a Source Four. As I close my eyes to write this, I can see how an old Strand 30-degree feels inside of a theatre or outside during an outdoor performance, and how a tried-and-true PAR64 can burns so beautifully bright and amber when it’s going through red shift during a nice slow fade-up during a song in an arena. Even awesome old Kliegl 6×8’s have a good beam still, as long as the optics are changed from those miserable step lenses!

As a side note, I listened to Vesa Honkonen tell a story when I was attending graduate study in Sweden about “trusting” the light from a certain type of reflector, and how that trust cost him time and money on a project.  So as a bit of an aside, with every statement is an equal anti-statement!

I have gotten to know the fixtures in our industry very well because I’ve been fortunate to use them in a real variety of performance situations and installations. When you get to know something like an ellipsoidal fixture with an incandescent lamp in it and you use it over and over and over again, you get to trust the fixture.  I can say with ease that I trust the light that comes from the business end of a Source Four; at the same time, I trust the light that comes out of an Altman 360Q as well, whether it has an HX601 lamp in it or an old FEL lamp.  As a designer, as an artist — I know what that light from an incandescent lamp in one of the “typical” variety of ellipsoidals is going to do for me in a scene on actors of any skin tone, or on a presenter during, or on film and video, and whether it has a chunk of R26 or L181HT in it.  I know that kind of light.  I trust that light.

In the world we live in now, incandescent lamps are slowly becoming forcefully shunned by a growing portion of the lighting industries as a whole (and politicians, sadly), with LED replacements becoming the forced norm by pretty much all of the companies that at one time were pushing an incandescent based fixture.  These companies are all now driving quickly on the road of a really good trend: to produce a fixture that provides the same kind of light or better than that of an incandescent lamp based fixture with a lot less power consumption and without losing any light quality.  Sounds easy enough, right?

There is a strange, edgy, “new car smell” feeling towards the new strains of LED fixtures making their births into the industry.  We are inundated with them at the trade shows in our business, just like we were with the incandescent conventionals.  Manufacturers, this is perfectly acceptable, and I think that it’s one of your biggest assets in this industry.  It’s your job to make us trust your fixtures, through hands-on videos and “shoot-outs” between incandescent and LED fixtures out there.  My informal surveying of conference attendees over the last three years has seen many responses like “TOO MANY LEDS” and “If I see another crappy wannabe LED fixture at another trade show, I’m going to die.”  Believe it or not, this is a really good thing — it provides an opportunity for the exceptional equipment to rise to the top of the Diode Ocean, as I like to call it.  Lately, these exceptions are overcoming their inferior rivals, much to my happiness.

Users, we have a job to do, too — we have to give the manufacturers the chance to trust LED light.  We have to learn how it is different than its incandescent counterparts.  We’ve had all of these decades to learn how to work with incandescent light (and HID light too, for what it’s worth), and we know it.  We trust it, and we love it.  But why is that?  It’s because it’s what we know, and it really is that simple.  Once we give the LED ellipsoidal generation a chance, you know we’re going to trust that too.  This isn’t to say that LEDs are done developing, this obviously isn’t true.  But I am noticing some unbelievably incredible advances in LED engines and output technology lately, especially after LDI in October 2012, and I have to say that I am finally ready to learn to trust LED conventional ellipsoidals.  It’s hard not to at this point to see that LED ellipsoidals are becoming the obvious choice, with the color temperature tuning we see now and the low power requirement that they provide — and to argue against energy consumption and power conservation is just not in my DNA.

Over the next 2 weeks I’m going to be comparing the LED conventional ellipsoidals we see in Entertainment to their incandescent counterparts over the next month, starting with ETC’s new Source Four LED line first, followed by Robert Juliat’s Zep and Tibo ranges, then moving on to the RevEAL Profile from Prism Projection, and so on.  In the mean time, let’s take a look at the characteristics I’ll be examining that I find important to applying trust, at least on paper – you can argue that there are more to see, but for the sake of argument, let’s start with:

  • Cost Comparison:
    What kinds of costs are we looking at over the course of an LED Ellipsoidal lifetime?  How different is it, really?
  • Light Output, or Perceived Brightness:
    How does it compare to a comparable incandescent conventional?
  • Spectral Analysis:
    What is the white light in the beam comprised of with respect to wavelength?
  • Power Consumption:
    When you put an LED ellipsoidal up against an incandescent lamp at 575W, how does it perform?
  • Weight:
    I have to stick these in a truck and on a truss at some point, so what is the difference I need to know?
  • Controllable Properties:
    Obviously I have only a few with an incandescent fixture, so what comes stock in an LED ellipsoidal that makes a difference?

Let’s go on this journey together.  When we work on something together as an industry, we get to make it how we want it to be, and manufacturers listen.  Once we started to get involved with the ways that incandescent lamps were developed and lighting designers started demanding better control over design and engineering of incandescent lamps, they improved.  All we have to do now is learn what the LED Ellipsoidal generation can do for us, and we can really make a difference.

Image