High End Systems has released a series of training videos for the new Hog 4!



From a press release at High End Systems:

Following the extremely successful HOG4 launch and due to incredibly high demand, High End Systems is today releasing a series of Hog4 training videos.

In tandem with the large number of worldwide training classes undertaken both by High End Systems and it’s extensive distributor network, the initial 12 videos will allow everyone to learn how to use a Hog.

The videos have been split into easy to watch segments meaning that beginners as well as experienced users will benefit from them. They are also in a logical order allowing for the user to move from one element of the Hog software to another with ease. The 12 videos means that users who only need to look at a specific area of the console may do this with ease.

“The addition of these videos to our already extensive training program is testament to our commitment to offer education at multiple levels” says Jeff Pelzl, VP, Technical and Marketing Services “and we are committed to ensuring that everyone has access to Hog training.”

“We realized that not everyone is able to attend training classes and also that users want the ability to brush up on certain areas of the platform’ says Chris Ferrante, Director of Product Management “so we partnered with Colin Wood of Pre Production Services and now have a brilliant suite of training videos”

These videos can be seen at the following location:  http://www.highend.com/support/training/Hog4Training/index.asp

As well as launching this suite of videos, High End Systems has recently launched version 1.2 for the Hog4 platform adding a host of new features including Command Keys, which continues the aggressive release schedule embarked upon on the platform’s launch.


The videos:

Lesson 1:  Starting a New Show

Lesson 2: Default Layout of a New Show

Lesson 3: An Introduction to Patching

Lesson 4: Basic Programming

Lesson 5: Cue Playback

Lesson 6: Using Palettes

Lesson 7: Basic Cue Timing and Editing

Lesson 8: Tracking

Lesson 9: User Kinds

Lesson 10: Command Keys

Lesson 11: Multi-Console Setup

Lesson 12: Configuring Art-Net

I hope to see more of these from MORE console manufacturers in the near future!!!



Who is THAT?!  Wait, is that — is that Nikola Tesla?!  HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Nikola Tesla!

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikola_Tesla

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikola_Tesla

Well, it’s birthday time for one of the most prolific inventory of humanity — Nikola Tesla’s 207th birthday is today (10 July 1856 – 7 January 1943)!  If he was still alive, I would definitely suggest we have a Tweet-up and buy that man a round!  A man who thought all human beings should have free energy, believed in the power of peace, and created more useful inventions than most people alive today — Nikola Tesla is one historical badass.  He also got legally fornicated by Thomas Edison, which is another post altogether, but still managed to do unbelievable work on alternating current electricity.



We here at JimOnLight want to share your amazingness with the world:

The History of Nikola Tesla – a Short Story from Jeremiah Warren on Vimeo.

Also — from The OatmealMAD PROPS to our man Nikola Tesla!  I cross-post this with every positive intention possible:

nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-1 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-2 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-3 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-4 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-5 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-6 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-7 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-8 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-9 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-10

We celebrate your life here at JimOnLight.com — and here’s a toast to hoping someone makes your dreams of free energy generating devices and perpetual motion systems a reality!



Passing Through from Olafur Haraldsson on Vimeo.

Tesla’s obituary:



Thanks to The Oatmeal, Wikipedia, The Daily Kos, EEP, and Brad DeLong!

Pink Floyd’s Lighting Designer, Arthur Max, Has A Bad Day on Headset – in 1973


It’s the day before Independence Day off here in the USA.

There is nothing you’re doing right now that can’t wait for 11 minutes while you watch Arthur Max at the office while working a 1973 Pink Floyd show in Detroit — the venue ruled that Pink Floyd had to use the Union spot ops from the venue instead of the Pink Floyd crew, and with some animation, this is one of the best things you’ll see today!  Thanks to Cliff Port, a fan filmmaker that really got a good belly laugh out of me today!

You know who Arthur Max is, right?  He’s a production designer and artist who does a ton of movies now, but lit Floyd back in the day along with working for Bill Graham at the Filmore East.  From IMDB:

A native New Yorker who worked as a Stage Lighting Designer in the late 1960s and early 1970s in the music industry, and then, after studying architecture in England and Italy, went on to do several architectural design projects in London. He entered British film as an assistant to several British Production Designers in the mid-1980s. First for Stuart Craig on Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes and Cal (both 1984) and then for Ashetton Gorton on Revolution (1985). His Production Design career began withTV commercials during the years 1985-1995 for many different Directors, including Ridley Scott and David Fincher, with whom he would go on to collaborate on feature films.

This is so awesome, I think I may just watch it again.

HUGE thanks to Simone Kay’s YouTube channel!

PHISH! New Video Clips of the Hampton Coliseum Reunion Shows from March 2009


I started digging my way through the 2 terabytes or so of uncut, backlogged video I have to process.  Behind every folder is something I have forgotten that I filmed, and I am uncovering some really fun stuff!

Here’s a handful of clips from when Greggity and I flew the famous mockingbird from Columbus, OH to Hampton, VA for the Phish reunion shows on March 6-8, 2009.  The clips I had sitting in a folder were, in order:

Army of One
Down with Disease JAM
Tweezer Reprise

Enjoy! Also check out Greg and I chatting with Chris Kuroda, Phish’s lighting designer, during the Hampton 2009 run, all four parts:

Part 1:

Part 2:

Part 3:

Part 4:

Ready?  Get your coffee, have a seat, and rock out!

PHISH! 2009 Hampton Coliseum Reunion Shows from JimOnLight.com! from Jim Hutchison on Vimeo.

It’s James Clerk Maxwell’s Birthday! HAPPY BIRTHDAY, James Clerk Maxwell!!!


There’s a guy we all have everything to thank for, and his name was Maxwell…  JAMES CLERK MAXWELL, to be precise!  Today is the birthday of Mr. James Clerk Maxwell, the man who pretty much discovered the laws that drive our physical universe.  When we talk about “let there be light,” we’re talking about Mr. Maxwell.

I wrote a post on Maxwell’s accomplishments, check it out — and Happy Birthday, James Clerk Maxwell!!!  If you weren’t already dead, you’d more than likely have a different hairdo today:



But then again maybe not, the hipster/Steampunk thing seems to be working for you.


Wybron Closing Its Doors After 35 Years of Business


Wybron, the company that invented the Color Scroller back in 1980, is closing its doors for the last time at the end of June 2013, according to a company email sent to its dealer network last night.  From the email, sent to JOL from a source not authorized to comment – bolding is mine:

Dear Dealers,

After a long and pleasant relationship with you, Wybron is ceasing business at the end of June. A press release will go out on Friday to the public announcing  the same.

The text of the press release follows:
Wybron Closes Doors After 35 Years of Innovation in Stage Lighting Industry

COLORADO SPRINGS, CO – June 6, 2013 – Wybron, a leading stage lighting supplier announced today that the company will close its doors on June 30, 2013.

The company is best known for transforming entertainment, church and architectural industries with its innovation of cutting-edge lighting products.

For years, the stage lighting industry has been led by companies with three-letter names,” said President and CEO Keny Whitright.  “PRG, ETC, ELS, TMB, and BMI are just a few of these. For 35 years Wybron struggled through with the burden of a six-letter name,” Whitright said laughing, “We finally realized we have too many letters in the company name.  It was time to close the doors.

Whitright said that closing the Wybron manufacturing plant is bittersweet.  “I will miss the business that I know and love.  But, I am looking forward to scaling back and becoming an FTD man.  Fishing, Traveling and Driving my cars will fill most of my days,” said Whitright. “Notice that I am planning to carry the three letter theme into my retirement.”

Wybron will host an online garage sale starting June 14, 2013, in order to liquidate its remaining new and used products and spare parts.  It will offer amazing deals and extraordinary closeout pricing. Visit the Wybron website at www.wybron.com beginning June 14 to learn more about the garage sale offers.

Any pending orders are  being filled, but if you have registered a job past June, we will be unable to supply that gear.

Service on existing equipment is uncertain at this time. We are looking for a company to do service, but don’t have anything in place now.

Best Regards,

Keny Whitright
President, Wybron, Inc.

Keny, I’m sorry to see Wybron close.  Some of my most enjoyable work was designed the right way because of your product.  From a grateful industry, JimOnLight.com says thank you for all you’ve contributed to the Industry.  I hope that you fill out your days with the happiness that you deserve, and that your roads are always clear and sunny.

The Daily Lamp – SLAMP Presents Avia and Aria from Zaha Hadid!

Please excuse the radio silence yesterday, I had to buckle down hard and put out another few dozen resumes and applications for some work!  Speaking of…  anyone in the market for a lighting designer and industry expert with 15 years of production design experience and 7 years of market writing and communications?  I’m your guy!  Email me!

Today’s Daily Lamp is AMAZINGLY BEAUTIFUL – world, meet the Avia and Aria Series for Slamp from Zaha Hadid, a genius of light:


I can only imagine what Avia or Aria would look like with a clear enveloped large filament lamp inside…  can you image what this beauty would do with that kind of lamp?  You’d have the most gorgeous shadows on everything in that room!






On Avia and Aria from SLAMP:

Aria by Zaha Hadid

Aria is a lamp designed by Zaha Hadid which combines dramatic architectural features with the intrinsic weightlessness of the materials, creating a sculpture of light and technology that fascinates and enchants observers.

The 50 individual layers of Cristalflex (a techno-polymer patented by Slamp) work together to make Aria seem as if is about to take flight, characterised by complex yet harmonic forms that embrace the light source in a veiled breath.

The large lamp is formed of a central structure capable of flooding the entire room with light, thanks to 6 light sources and a spotlight directed downwards.

With an 90 cm diameter and 130 cm high, Aria enhances any space, rendering it luxurious without losing any of its contemporary style.

The elegant black veiled finish lends a touch of mystery and seduction.

Avia by Zaha Hadid

Avia combines the majesty of great architecture with a lamp for day-to-day use, perfectly integrating large volumes with advanced lighting techniques and technology.

To give shape to such an ambitious project the designer used 52 different layers of Opalflex, a techno-polymer patented by Slamp, creating an effect of fluidity, dynamism and harmony resulting in a perfect architectural form that gently embraces the light source.

Avia captures the gaze of anyone who draws near, offering constantly changing perspectives and reflections, transforming itself from a simple light source into a genuine sculpture to be admired, making any space more suggestive.

The central structure is capable of providing 360 degrees light, thanks to its numerous light sources and a downwards-facing spotlight.

The lamp is available in 4 different sizes, making it capable of adapting to any kind of space: two smaller sizes, ideal for use at home and two larger versions for enhancing large-sized spaces. Two colour tones are available: the uncontaminated purity of total white and the absolute elegance of total black.

Fluid and dynamic, Avia is a miniature piece of architecture, perfect for adding stature to the home. 52 different layers of Opalflex® transform it from a source of light into an object of admiration with soft, amplified tones and reflections. The lamp is available in four sizes: two small and two large.

From DesignBoom, where this lovely beauty of a lamp originated:

presented at euroluce during salone del mobile 2013, ‘aria & avia’ lamps designed by zaha hadid for slamp combine dramatic architectural features with the intrinsic weightlessness of the materials from which they are made, creating illuminated sculptures that fascinate and enchant their observers.  Over 50 individual layers of a techno-polymer medium work together to make the hanging lights seem as if they are about to take flight, characterized by complex yet harmonic forms that embrace their brilliance in a veiled breath.  The large fixtures are formed from a central structure capable of flooding an entire room with 360 degrees of ample illumination, thanks to six lucent sources and a spotlight directed downwards.  The hanging pieces bring together the majesty of great architecture for day-to-day use, perfectly integrating large volumes with advanced lighting techniques and technology.  Available in four different sizes, they are capable of adapting to any kind of interior environment: two smaller sizes, ideal for use at home and two larger versions for enhancing large-sized rooms.

This might be my favorite lamp from the last few weeks.  Zaha, I think you are an amazing designer!

Readers, you have GOT to go check out more of Zaha Hadid’s work – Zaha Hadid Architects is one place, and also check out her vast collection at SLAMP.  Flip through the gallery below, click on any image and it opens up into a blackbox to get the full effect of this amazing design!

The Daily Lamp – Fellow Lamp from Yours Design

Today’s Daily Lamp reminds me of something that at any time could just hop out of its inanimate state and start running down the hall at my wife — ladies and gentlemen, the Fellow Lamp from New Zealand studio Yours Design:


From the pages of Yours Design on the Fellow Lamp:

Fellow Lamp provides any desk or with a sense of personality and companionship. With an undertone of elegance, beautiful hand turned wooden legs are angled to hold a specific posture. An adjustable head completes this piece and provides directional light.

Dimensions: Height 500mm
Materials: American Ash, spun Aluminium, Steel, Fabric Flex cable
Finish: Clear Satin wood lacquer, anodised Matte Black OR powder coat Gloss White

The Yours Design (or YS Collective, as they are now called), is made of three designers:

Y.S Collective is a contemporary design company based in Tauranga, New Zealand.

Founded by Daniel KampJames McNab and Samuel Griffin in 2012, Y.S Collective produces beautiful, innovative furniture and lighting as well as interior design solutions, for both residential and commercial settings.

All Y.S products are meticulously designed in our Tauranga studio and manufactured at different locations around New Zealand, using the combination of skilled labour, from some of the country’s best craftsmen, and modern manufacturing technologies. Our products then return to us for assembly and finishing touches before being sent out to our stockists, or direct to you.

The Y.S design process centres around quality and innovation. Each new project, to design a product or environment, is headed by one of our three designers and developed collaboratively, until it reaches perfection.

“We would describe our first collection as fresh and bold, almost basic, in the fact that the combination of simple forms and contrasting materials is consistent throughout. Exposed fixings and honest structural elements, give a clear insight into the assembly of all of our pieces. There is no design trickery here!” – our designers.


GAH!  I love this thing — it does seem to be saying “hey hey!  let me light this up for you!”  But just so you know, it’s telling you that to the tune of $695 bucks.






Thanks to Contemporist and The Design Home!


Getting to Know the LED Ellipsoidal Generation – A JimOnLight Series Introduction


I’ve done a lot of shows in my career so far. I’m lucky as hell, don’t get me wrong – but because of it, I feel like I have a real “bond” with incandescent and high-intensity discharge lamps (HIDs) that we use in this industry. It’s almost creepy sometimes – in my head, I know how a good ol’ no-color Source Four looks in a dark theatre. I know how an Altman 360Q looks in a theatre sitting next to it, too – and how it looks sitting with a Shakespeare, also uncorrected, next to a Source Four. As I close my eyes to write this, I can see how an old Strand 30-degree feels inside of a theatre or outside during an outdoor performance, and how a tried-and-true PAR64 can burns so beautifully bright and amber when it’s going through red shift during a nice slow fade-up during a song in an arena. Even awesome old Kliegl 6×8’s have a good beam still, as long as the optics are changed from those miserable step lenses!

As a side note, I listened to Vesa Honkonen tell a story when I was attending graduate study in Sweden about “trusting” the light from a certain type of reflector, and how that trust cost him time and money on a project.  So as a bit of an aside, with every statement is an equal anti-statement!

I have gotten to know the fixtures in our industry very well because I’ve been fortunate to use them in a real variety of performance situations and installations. When you get to know something like an ellipsoidal fixture with an incandescent lamp in it and you use it over and over and over again, you get to trust the fixture.  I can say with ease that I trust the light that comes from the business end of a Source Four; at the same time, I trust the light that comes out of an Altman 360Q as well, whether it has an HX601 lamp in it or an old FEL lamp.  As a designer, as an artist — I know what that light from an incandescent lamp in one of the “typical” variety of ellipsoidals is going to do for me in a scene on actors of any skin tone, or on a presenter during, or on film and video, and whether it has a chunk of R26 or L181HT in it.  I know that kind of light.  I trust that light.

In the world we live in now, incandescent lamps are slowly becoming forcefully shunned by a growing portion of the lighting industries as a whole (and politicians, sadly), with LED replacements becoming the forced norm by pretty much all of the companies that at one time were pushing an incandescent based fixture.  These companies are all now driving quickly on the road of a really good trend: to produce a fixture that provides the same kind of light or better than that of an incandescent lamp based fixture with a lot less power consumption and without losing any light quality.  Sounds easy enough, right?

There is a strange, edgy, “new car smell” feeling towards the new strains of LED fixtures making their births into the industry.  We are inundated with them at the trade shows in our business, just like we were with the incandescent conventionals.  Manufacturers, this is perfectly acceptable, and I think that it’s one of your biggest assets in this industry.  It’s your job to make us trust your fixtures, through hands-on videos and “shoot-outs” between incandescent and LED fixtures out there.  My informal surveying of conference attendees over the last three years has seen many responses like “TOO MANY LEDS” and “If I see another crappy wannabe LED fixture at another trade show, I’m going to die.”  Believe it or not, this is a really good thing — it provides an opportunity for the exceptional equipment to rise to the top of the Diode Ocean, as I like to call it.  Lately, these exceptions are overcoming their inferior rivals, much to my happiness.

Users, we have a job to do, too — we have to give the manufacturers the chance to trust LED light.  We have to learn how it is different than its incandescent counterparts.  We’ve had all of these decades to learn how to work with incandescent light (and HID light too, for what it’s worth), and we know it.  We trust it, and we love it.  But why is that?  It’s because it’s what we know, and it really is that simple.  Once we give the LED ellipsoidal generation a chance, you know we’re going to trust that too.  This isn’t to say that LEDs are done developing, this obviously isn’t true.  But I am noticing some unbelievably incredible advances in LED engines and output technology lately, especially after LDI in October 2012, and I have to say that I am finally ready to learn to trust LED conventional ellipsoidals.  It’s hard not to at this point to see that LED ellipsoidals are becoming the obvious choice, with the color temperature tuning we see now and the low power requirement that they provide — and to argue against energy consumption and power conservation is just not in my DNA.

Over the next 2 weeks I’m going to be comparing the LED conventional ellipsoidals we see in Entertainment to their incandescent counterparts over the next month, starting with ETC’s new Source Four LED line first, followed by Robert Juliat’s Zep and Tibo ranges, then moving on to the RevEAL Profile from Prism Projection, and so on.  In the mean time, let’s take a look at the characteristics I’ll be examining that I find important to applying trust, at least on paper – you can argue that there are more to see, but for the sake of argument, let’s start with:

  • Cost Comparison:
    What kinds of costs are we looking at over the course of an LED Ellipsoidal lifetime?  How different is it, really?
  • Light Output, or Perceived Brightness:
    How does it compare to a comparable incandescent conventional?
  • Spectral Analysis:
    What is the white light in the beam comprised of with respect to wavelength?
  • Power Consumption:
    When you put an LED ellipsoidal up against an incandescent lamp at 575W, how does it perform?
  • Weight:
    I have to stick these in a truck and on a truss at some point, so what is the difference I need to know?
  • Controllable Properties:
    Obviously I have only a few with an incandescent fixture, so what comes stock in an LED ellipsoidal that makes a difference?

Let’s go on this journey together.  When we work on something together as an industry, we get to make it how we want it to be, and manufacturers listen.  Once we started to get involved with the ways that incandescent lamps were developed and lighting designers started demanding better control over design and engineering of incandescent lamps, they improved.  All we have to do now is learn what the LED Ellipsoidal generation can do for us, and we can really make a difference.


PLASA Made Their Technical Standards FREE FOR ALL!

PLASA_Standards ProSightLogo

Tobin from Barbizon posted this on the Barbizon Blog on Monday — in a move of complete awesomeness, PLASA (the Professional Lighting and Sound Association) has teamed up with the specialty insurance carrier ProSight Specialty Insurance to bring us all the PLASA Technical Standards, completely free, for instant download.

With everything that has gone wrong in the last few years in our industry, it’s awesome to see that an organization has dedicated itself to each and every one of us and our collective safety in Production.  Thank you so much for this, PLASA and ProSight!

Get downloading your FREE Technical Standards NOW!  GO!  GET OVER THERE!

Thanks, Tobin!  You rock!