Complete Footage of the Dropping of Fat Man On Nagasaki

That’s kind of a hard title to write.  Ever seen the documentary White Light/Black Rain: The Destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki? It’s not an easy documentary to watch; it gives a face to the receivers of the Fat Man and Little Boy inventions.

FatMan

A user named RestrictedData on YouTube has uploaded this video — which is pretty much the whole shebang, from rolling Fat Man out of the garage to the bomb detonating on Nagasaki, Japan.  It’s eleven minutes, but it’s historically awesome, and awesome not in the thumbs up way but awesome in the way that it was meant — it will fill you with awe to see that thing detonate.  It’s frightening:

Crazy. The unbelievable power of those things; I find it amazing that we can’t out that kind of energy towards free energy for everyone.  Can you imagine if we had small dishwasher-sized devices in our homes that delivered all of the power needed for heat and electricity?  Nah, instead we have weapons that can erase all life in a 5-mile radius and ruin the next two or three thousand years for the next 5-10 miles.  That’s so much better.

Happy Birthday, James Watt! (and JimOnLight, too!)

WHOA!  It’s good ol’ Jimmy Watt’s birthday!!!  That must also mean it’s MY birthday!!!

James-Watt

Gaaa, can you imagine humping a bunch of 4/0 feeder in THAT jacket?!  Oh no I didn’t.

Check out a post I wrote about the Amazing James Watt over here at…  uh… on, uh, JimOnLight!

Also, also, how about a FREE KINDLE BOOK about James Watt, written by Andrew Carnegie?!

Happy Birthday, Jimmy Watt!

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, NIKOLA TESLA! You Were A BADASS!

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Who is THAT?!  Wait, is that — is that Nikola Tesla?!  HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Nikola Tesla!

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikola_Tesla

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikola_Tesla

Well, it’s birthday time for one of the most prolific inventory of humanity — Nikola Tesla’s 207th birthday is today (10 July 1856 – 7 January 1943)!  If he was still alive, I would definitely suggest we have a Tweet-up and buy that man a round!  A man who thought all human beings should have free energy, believed in the power of peace, and created more useful inventions than most people alive today — Nikola Tesla is one historical badass.  He also got legally fornicated by Thomas Edison, which is another post altogether, but still managed to do unbelievable work on alternating current electricity.

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We here at JimOnLight want to share your amazingness with the world:

The History of Nikola Tesla – a Short Story from Jeremiah Warren on Vimeo.

Also — from The OatmealMAD PROPS to our man Nikola Tesla!  I cross-post this with every positive intention possible:

nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-1 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-2 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-3 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-4 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-5 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-6 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-7 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-8 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-9 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-10

We celebrate your life here at JimOnLight.com — and here’s a toast to hoping someone makes your dreams of free energy generating devices and perpetual motion systems a reality!

nikolateslatime

Until next year…  HAPPY BIRTHDAY, NIKOLA TESLA!

Passing Through from Olafur Haraldsson on Vimeo.

Tesla’s obituary:

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Thanks to The Oatmeal, Wikipedia, The Daily Kos, EEP, and Brad DeLong!

Awesome Nerditude: GE Engineer Nick Holonyak Talks about Inventing LEDs

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Get ready for some historical awesomesauce — here’s Nick Holonyak, the GE engineer who invented LEDs, waxing poetic about the process, times, and history of the process of inventing light emitting diodes.  This is an awesome 3 minutes!

From an article at GE Lighting:

Holonyak got his PhD in 1954. In 1957, after a year at Bell Labs and a two year stint in the Army, he joined GE’s research lab in Syracuse, New York. GE was already exploring semiconductor applications and building the forerunners of modern diodes called thyristors and rectifiers. At a GE lab in Schenectady, the scientist Robert Hall was trying to build the first diode laser. Hall, Holonyak and others noticed that semiconductors emit radiation, including visible light, when electricity flows through them. Holonyak and Hall were trying to “turn them on,” and channel, focus and multiply the light.

Hall was the first to succeed. He built the world’s first semiconductor laser. Without it, there would be no CD and DVD players today. “Nobody knew how to turn the semiconductor into the laser,” Holonyak says. “We arrived at the answer before anyone else.”

But Hall’s laser emitted only invisible, infrared light. Holonyak spent more time in his lab, testing, cutting and polishing his hand-made semiconducting alloys. In the fall of 1962, he got first light. “People thought that alloys were rough and turgid and lumpy,” he says. “We knew damn well what happened and that we had a very powerful way of converting electrical current directly into light. We had the ultimate lamp.”

Holonyak left GE in 1963 and started teaching at his alma mater, the University of Illinois. Today he is the John Bardeen professor of electrical and computer engineering and physics. He’s collected dozens of top prizes for his work, including the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, theLemelson-MIT Prize, and membership in the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

The red LED “was just the beginning,” he says. “I knew that it was a very powerful thing and that these materials will become a source of white light. I thought it might be a decade. Little did I realize that it would take much longer than that.”

I freaking love Science.

Pink Floyd’s Lighting Designer, Arthur Max, Has A Bad Day on Headset – in 1973

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It’s the day before Independence Day off here in the USA.

There is nothing you’re doing right now that can’t wait for 11 minutes while you watch Arthur Max at the office while working a 1973 Pink Floyd show in Detroit — the venue ruled that Pink Floyd had to use the Union spot ops from the venue instead of the Pink Floyd crew, and with some animation, this is one of the best things you’ll see today!  Thanks to Cliff Port, a fan filmmaker that really got a good belly laugh out of me today!

You know who Arthur Max is, right?  He’s a production designer and artist who does a ton of movies now, but lit Floyd back in the day along with working for Bill Graham at the Filmore East.  From IMDB:

A native New Yorker who worked as a Stage Lighting Designer in the late 1960s and early 1970s in the music industry, and then, after studying architecture in England and Italy, went on to do several architectural design projects in London. He entered British film as an assistant to several British Production Designers in the mid-1980s. First for Stuart Craig on Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes and Cal (both 1984) and then for Ashetton Gorton on Revolution (1985). His Production Design career began withTV commercials during the years 1985-1995 for many different Directors, including Ridley Scott and David Fincher, with whom he would go on to collaborate on feature films.

This is so awesome, I think I may just watch it again.

HUGE thanks to Simone Kay’s YouTube channel!

PHISH! New Video Clips of the Hampton Coliseum Reunion Shows from March 2009

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I started digging my way through the 2 terabytes or so of uncut, backlogged video I have to process.  Behind every folder is something I have forgotten that I filmed, and I am uncovering some really fun stuff!

Here’s a handful of clips from when Greggity and I flew the famous mockingbird from Columbus, OH to Hampton, VA for the Phish reunion shows on March 6-8, 2009.  The clips I had sitting in a folder were, in order:

Army of One
Wilson
Down with Disease JAM
Contact
Tweezer Reprise

Enjoy! Also check out Greg and I chatting with Chris Kuroda, Phish’s lighting designer, during the Hampton 2009 run, all four parts:

Part 1:
http://www.jimonlight.com/2009/03/23/interview-with-chris-kuroda-lighting-designer-for-phish-part-one/

Part 2:
http://www.jimonlight.com/2009/03/24/interview-with-chris-kuroda-lighting-designer-for-phish-part-two/

Part 3:
http://www.jimonlight.com/2009/03/25/interview-with-chris-kuroda-lighting-designer-for-phish-part-three/

Part 4:
http://www.jimonlight.com/2009/03/26/interview-with-chris-kuroda-lighting-designer-for-phish-part-4/

Ready?  Get your coffee, have a seat, and rock out!

PHISH! 2009 Hampton Coliseum Reunion Shows from JimOnLight.com! from Jim Hutchison on Vimeo.

It’s James Clerk Maxwell’s Birthday! HAPPY BIRTHDAY, James Clerk Maxwell!!!

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There’s a guy we all have everything to thank for, and his name was Maxwell…  JAMES CLERK MAXWELL, to be precise!  Today is the birthday of Mr. James Clerk Maxwell, the man who pretty much discovered the laws that drive our physical universe.  When we talk about “let there be light,” we’re talking about Mr. Maxwell.

I wrote a post on Maxwell’s accomplishments, check it out — and Happy Birthday, James Clerk Maxwell!!!  If you weren’t already dead, you’d more than likely have a different hairdo today:

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But then again maybe not, the hipster/Steampunk thing seems to be working for you.

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Amazing Vintage Black and White NASA Project and Facilities Photos

Guide vanes in the 19-foot Pressure Wind Tunnel at Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, form an ellipse 33 feet high and 47 feet wide. The 23 vanes force the air to turn corners smoothly as it rushes through the giant passages. If vanes were omitted, the air would pile up in dense masses along the outside curves, like water rounding a bend in a fast brook. Turbulent eddies would interfere with the wind tunnel tests, which require a steady flow of fast, smooth air. (March 15, 1950)  - Courtesy of the awesomeness at Brainpickings.org

Guide vanes in the 19-foot Pressure Wind Tunnel at Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, form an ellipse 33 feet high and 47 feet wide. The 23 vanes force the air to turn corners smoothly as it rushes through the giant passages. If vanes were omitted, the air would pile up in dense masses along the outside curves, like water rounding a bend in a fast brook. Turbulent eddies would interfere with the wind tunnel tests, which require a steady flow of fast, smooth air. (March 15, 1950) – Courtesy of the awesomeness at Brainpickings.org

I saw this excellent article at a site I read called Brain Pickings regarding fear and the creative process a few nights ago as I bring to a close the entirety of the JimOnLight TV Episode 1 journey that has engulfed my life for the last year.  In the process of this, I discovered an amazing article that boasts a ton of vintage NASA project photographs from decades gone by, and I could not resist sharing these amazing pieces of history.

You have got to check out Brain PickingsMaria Popova is one of my heroes in this whole thing we call writing.

Maria, you’re awesome.  I hope you read my site sometime.

A September 11 Story from the Lighting Industry

I heard a really great story tonight.  It’s really hard to find a “good” story that has to do with September 11, 2001 — but I had dinner with a bunch of great folks tonight, and being that it’s September 11, it seemed appropriate.  It’s pretty weird to be sitting in another country on possibly one of the worst days in America’s history watching a different country play TV shows about the terrible day that was 9-11-01.  It’s also pretty eye-opening to be watching shows in a country that has considerably less anal attitudes towards what they show on television; talk about eye-opening.

So on September 11, 2001, many people were at the PLASA 2001 Show at Earl’s Court in London – afternoon was in full swing when 8am came and the planes started smashing into the World Trade Center.  News started passing around the show floor about what had happened, and the hubbub of the disaster began to make its rounds.  Across the show floor things continued, except for in one booth – High End Systems.  John Wiseman, the once Vice President of Worldwide Sales decided that HES wouldn’t be selling anything else that day while people in America were dying.  As I heard the story, the paraphrased John Wiseman said something along the lines of let’s shut it down for today, we’re going back to the hotel, no more for today.  One by one, following the High End Systems example, booths shut down one at a time.  I don’t know how many, but really who cares how many.

A year later on the first anniversary of the September 11 terrorist attacks on New York City, people were back at Earl’s Court in London for the PLASA 2002 Show.  It had been decided that a minute of silence would be held to commemorate those killed and lost on 9-11 during the PLASA show.  Brad Schiller from High End Systems at the time decided that, since we work in lighting and our silence is darkness, that HES would shut down the light and go dark to commemorate the moment.  Again, many booths followed suit, some did not, but it doesn’t really matter who didn’t — only that people followed Brad’s example and blacked out their lighting and sound to remember the dead and hurt.

As I go to these shows across the world, I am always remembered that we have one of the most awesome industries in all of the world, full of the world’s most amazing people.

To all of those killed, hurt, or heart broken on September 11, 2001 — this moment of silence is for you from JimOnLight.com.