DECLASSIFIED – Over 750 Nuclear Weapons Test Videos. Unreal.

Operation Teapot nuclear test photo from 1955

Lighting designers and video content people, heads up.  An amazing trove of over 750 films from the late 50’s and early 60’s have just been declassified, and scientists have put these old nuclear test films, many of them nitrate films disintegrating from sheer age, up on Youtube.

Recently, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has released a HUGE amount of nuclear project test videos for the numerous operations that the US Government conducted in order to test their weapons design, weapons damage effects, radiation fallout and effect testing, as well as many other types of tests.  It’s actually kinda genius how they conducted these tests — an “operation” would consist of a number of tests around a certain thing they wanted to test.  For example, I found in my research that the 14 tests that the US conducted in Nevada around 1955 were called Operation Teapot — 14 tests over things like damage, power, design of the actual weapon, and how it was delivered.  Each of the payloads (explosions) themselves were also named within the operation — so you have an operation that has X amount of tests — and this test video below was from the explosion in Operation Teapot aptly called TESLA, the third explosion test of Operation Teapot, on the first of March, 1955 at 1pm.  Seriously, watch this — this explosion was from high up on a steel tower — and it worked by smashing the core of the weapon from both ends of a tube, called a Linear Implosion:

Unreal. Another video angle of the TESLA payload explosion, which was meant to test the weapon’s design:

Lawrence Livermore has released an entirety of these videos. The playlist is here, on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Youtube channel — if you work with light, I highly recommend you checking these out. This is light, all light, in its purest broken down form of photons, doing all the damage that photons can make happen. Learn light for all that it is.

One more…  This is Operation Hardtack 1, the Nutmeg explosion; Operation Hardtack 1 was a group operation that included surface tests and barge tests, at the famous Bikini Atoll location.  This was a 25.1 kiloton burst from a barge above a huge underground crater made from previous test detonations.  Watch the power of this monster we were unleashing:

And of course the entire playlist, totally worth a scroll:

Link hat tips

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Youtube channel

Lawrence Livermore Nuclear Films youtube playlist (also seen above here)

Funker530 — one of my favorite military blogs, pointed this out

Wikiwand — just an excellent information trove

 

Kodak Implodes the Iconic Building 53

kodak_building_53_imposion

Kodak has imploded the iconic Building 53 in the Eastman Business Park.  It’s not the first of the buildings to go, but it is definitely the one that everyone knows — the 9 stack sitting on top has been a landmark in the location since the building’s construction in 1923.  This isn’t the first building in Eastman Business Park that Kodak implodes, but it is one of the more well-known.  Watch the video below of the implosion, from a pretty decent close distance!

Here’s a bad ass DRONE VIEW of the demolition:

Another amazing view:

Ok, one more, plus an interview with some of the demo guys:

Demolition company Diacon was involved in the blast engineering; MB Glick was also involved in the demo, but I do not know the capacities.  Pretty cool videos, huh?

For another awesome demolition video, check out the Demolition of Texas Stadium, filmed by awesome person and dear friend Jessica Amspoker!

texas-stadium

 

More on KODAK and its life story here…  More on the demolition here, and an article on the destruction of Building 53 here, at Petapixel.

Joe Spira, Inventor of the Household Dimmer, Dies

Unfortunately, Joe Spira has passed.  Joe was the man behind Lutron, otherwise known as having a household dimmer in about every place you could imagine of their brand name.  We’re really sorry to hear of Joe’s passing.

Joe Spira brought the household dimmer to market — his patent could probably be praised as one of the most important lighting and interior design modifiers of the last 75 years.

joe-spira-lutron-website

Lutron’s tribute to Joe Spira on the main Lutron.com website

From an article at MyFox28:

COOPERSBURG, Pa. (AP) — Joel Spira, who brought the light dimmer switch to households across the nation and transformed his Lutron Electronics Company into a leading manufacturer of lighting controls, died of natural causes on Wednesday. He was 88.

The Coopersburg, Pennsylvania-based company, which confirmed the death, said he had been working with company engineers on a new product the night before he died.

Spira, who patented an electronic light dimming device, developed the company into a worldwide distributor of motorized shades and lighting and temperature controls. He led the company for 54 years and most recently was chairman and director of research.

The Morning Call said Lutron currently employs 1,100 people in the Lehigh Valley.

“Someday I’ll be gone,” he told the newspaper in 2012. “But dimmers will be with us forever.”

The privately held company said Spira is credited with more than 300 design and utility patents in the United States. The company now holds 2,700 patents across the globe.

A company history posted on its website said that by 1959, Spira had developed a solid-state dimmer for incandescent lighting that was practical for home use. He and his wife, Ruth, incorporated Lutron two years later, and set out to mass-market the product.

“His innovations not only save energy, but also make people’s lives better by creating residential and commercial spaces that are more comfortable and more pleasant,” Lutron president Michael Pessina said in a statement.

Spira graduated with a bachelor’s degree in physics from Purdue University in 1948.

Update, from the Washington Post:

The death was confirmed by his company, based in Coopersburg, Pa. The cause was not disclosed. Mr. Spira had reportedly been working with company engineers on a new product the night before he died.

Mr. Spira, who patented an electronic light-dimming device, developed Lutron Electronics into a worldwide distributor of motorized shades and lighting and temperature controls. He led the company for 54 years and most recently was chairman and director of research.

The privately held company said Mr. Spira is credited with more than 300 design and utility patents in the United States. Lutron holds 2,700 patents across the world.

A corporate history posted on the company’s Web site said that by 1959, Mr. Spira had developed a solid-state dimmer for incandescent lighting that was practical for home use. He and his wife, Ruth, incorporated Lutron two years later and set out to mass-market the product.

Mr. Spira was born in New York City and served in the Navy during World War II. He received a bachelor’s degree in physics from Indiana’s Purdue University in 1948.

Lutron employs 1,100 people in Pennsylvania’s Lehigh Valley, according to the Morning Call newspaper in Allentown, Pa.

Happy Birthday, James Watt (and JimOnLight)!

WHOA!  No way.  It’s January 19 again, and that means that it is the birthday time celebration for good ol’ James Jim-Jim-Jimmy-Jarooni Watt, the man we have to thank for several different and awesome inventions like the steam engine and the first copy machine.  Yeah, that’s right.  He’s awesome — or at least was while he was alive!

James-Watt

Check out a post I wrote about the Amazing James Watt over here at…  uh… on, uh, JimOnLight!

Also, also, how about a FREE KINDLE BOOK about James Watt, written by Andrew Carnegie?!  Everyone likes free, it’s a proven fact — now tie FREE and LEARNING and you’re on fire!!!

Happy Birthday, Jimmy Watt!

Paul Gregory of Focus Lighting Talks Times Square Ball History

I love to remember how the Times Square ball has changed over the years.  It’s one of my first memories, seeing that thing lit up on television as a very little lighting designer of 5 or 6 years old.  I always wonder if my mom and dad knew that was one of my first memories.

Check this out — a video of Paul Gregory of Focus Lighting talking about the history of the Times Square Ball and how it has changed over the years.  Very cool video!

Complete Footage of the Dropping of Fat Man On Nagasaki

That’s kind of a hard title to write.  Ever seen the documentary White Light/Black Rain: The Destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki? It’s not an easy documentary to watch; it gives a face to the receivers of the Fat Man and Little Boy inventions.

FatMan

A user named RestrictedData on YouTube has uploaded this video — which is pretty much the whole shebang, from rolling Fat Man out of the garage to the bomb detonating on Nagasaki, Japan.  It’s eleven minutes, but it’s historically awesome, and awesome not in the thumbs up way but awesome in the way that it was meant — it will fill you with awe to see that thing detonate.  It’s frightening:

Crazy. The unbelievable power of those things; I find it amazing that we can’t out that kind of energy towards free energy for everyone.  Can you imagine if we had small dishwasher-sized devices in our homes that delivered all of the power needed for heat and electricity?  Nah, instead we have weapons that can erase all life in a 5-mile radius and ruin the next two or three thousand years for the next 5-10 miles.  That’s so much better.

Happy Birthday, James Watt! (and JimOnLight, too!)

WHOA!  It’s good ol’ Jimmy Watt’s birthday!!!  That must also mean it’s MY birthday!!!

James-Watt

Gaaa, can you imagine humping a bunch of 4/0 feeder in THAT jacket?!  Oh no I didn’t.

Check out a post I wrote about the Amazing James Watt over here at…  uh… on, uh, JimOnLight!

Also, also, how about a FREE KINDLE BOOK about James Watt, written by Andrew Carnegie?!

Happy Birthday, Jimmy Watt!

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, NIKOLA TESLA! You Were A BADASS!

tesla-free-energy

Who is THAT?!  Wait, is that — is that Nikola Tesla?!  HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Nikola Tesla!

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikola_Tesla

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikola_Tesla

Well, it’s birthday time for one of the most prolific inventory of humanity — Nikola Tesla’s 207th birthday is today (10 July 1856 – 7 January 1943)!  If he was still alive, I would definitely suggest we have a Tweet-up and buy that man a round!  A man who thought all human beings should have free energy, believed in the power of peace, and created more useful inventions than most people alive today — Nikola Tesla is one historical badass.  He also got legally fornicated by Thomas Edison, which is another post altogether, but still managed to do unbelievable work on alternating current electricity.

Tesla-life

bitch-please-nikola-tesla

We here at JimOnLight want to share your amazingness with the world:

The History of Nikola Tesla – a Short Story from Jeremiah Warren on Vimeo.

Also — from The OatmealMAD PROPS to our man Nikola Tesla!  I cross-post this with every positive intention possible:

nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-1 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-2 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-3 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-4 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-5 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-6 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-7 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-8 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-9 nikola-tesla-the-oatmeal-10

We celebrate your life here at JimOnLight.com — and here’s a toast to hoping someone makes your dreams of free energy generating devices and perpetual motion systems a reality!

nikolateslatime

Until next year…  HAPPY BIRTHDAY, NIKOLA TESLA!

Passing Through from Olafur Haraldsson on Vimeo.

Tesla’s obituary:

tesla-death-new-york-times-1943-small

 

Thanks to The Oatmeal, Wikipedia, The Daily Kos, EEP, and Brad DeLong!

Awesome Nerditude: GE Engineer Nick Holonyak Talks about Inventing LEDs

nick_holonyak

Get ready for some historical awesomesauce — here’s Nick Holonyak, the GE engineer who invented LEDs, waxing poetic about the process, times, and history of the process of inventing light emitting diodes.  This is an awesome 3 minutes!

From an article at GE Lighting:

Holonyak got his PhD in 1954. In 1957, after a year at Bell Labs and a two year stint in the Army, he joined GE’s research lab in Syracuse, New York. GE was already exploring semiconductor applications and building the forerunners of modern diodes called thyristors and rectifiers. At a GE lab in Schenectady, the scientist Robert Hall was trying to build the first diode laser. Hall, Holonyak and others noticed that semiconductors emit radiation, including visible light, when electricity flows through them. Holonyak and Hall were trying to “turn them on,” and channel, focus and multiply the light.

Hall was the first to succeed. He built the world’s first semiconductor laser. Without it, there would be no CD and DVD players today. “Nobody knew how to turn the semiconductor into the laser,” Holonyak says. “We arrived at the answer before anyone else.”

But Hall’s laser emitted only invisible, infrared light. Holonyak spent more time in his lab, testing, cutting and polishing his hand-made semiconducting alloys. In the fall of 1962, he got first light. “People thought that alloys were rough and turgid and lumpy,” he says. “We knew damn well what happened and that we had a very powerful way of converting electrical current directly into light. We had the ultimate lamp.”

Holonyak left GE in 1963 and started teaching at his alma mater, the University of Illinois. Today he is the John Bardeen professor of electrical and computer engineering and physics. He’s collected dozens of top prizes for his work, including the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, theLemelson-MIT Prize, and membership in the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

The red LED “was just the beginning,” he says. “I knew that it was a very powerful thing and that these materials will become a source of white light. I thought it might be a decade. Little did I realize that it would take much longer than that.”

I freaking love Science.