Dallas PGA Golf Celebrity Party, InLight Gobos, and Absolute Lighting. PARTY. Part 2!

Yeah, I told you I had a metric ton of photos to put up for the party I went to with Rick Hutton on Monday.  That was an amazing time – I wanna party like that again soon!

BlissLight on the tree!

All photography C/O Jim Hutchison and Light Associated Media, LLC

Dallas PGA Golf Celebrity Party, InLight Gobos, and Absolute Lighting. PARTY.

I got invited to an amazing party on Monday night.  A “local Dallas PGA golf celebrity” who shall remain nameless, Rick Hutton from InLight Gobos, and a bunch of awesome techs from Absolute Lighting in Dallas and I hung out until the wee hours of the morning, partying and hobnobbing with some really excellent people.  An amazing time was had by all.

I met so many people.  I saw so much mind-blowing party lighting.  I rubbed elbows with really awesome men and women, and just had myself an excellent experience.  I will say this – when InLight Gobos is involved with anything I see, it is always absolutely visually stunning.  Yeah.  Rick’s stuff is the best in the industry, in my humble designer opinion.  He’s been rocking and rolling on top of this biz for many, many years.

Rick was the general contractor for the design, the templates, and the BlissLights, and he subbed out equipment to Absolute Lighting, who provided DL-2s, COLORados, and other general gear.  Control was on a Hog III, and the video content mixed with the LED wash on the “local Dallas PGA golf celebrity” house made this party one of the top 2 house parties I have ever attended.

Thanks for the amazing time, the sushi, the sushi display platforms (leave that one to your imagination), the mind-blowing party lighting, and the invite.  If you’ve not heard of Absolute Lighting, you need to check them out.  Great people, great work!

I have A LOT of pictures of this one, folks.  A lot.  Like over a hundred.  I’m gonna spread them out over a few days so as not to screw up your JimOnLight.com image loading experience, so get ready for days of excellent views!

A long-exposure of the space cannons at the entrance to the neighborhood:

Yours truly, Rick Hutton, and Flo the awesomeness at the end of the night – or beginning of the morning, however you want to look at it:

Laura and Austin rocking the DL-2 rig:

All photography C/O Jim Hutchison and Light Associated Media, LLC

Katy Perry’s Light Up Dress

So, those of you that follow Katy Perry – did you see her awesome light-up dress from the Met Ball recently? I tracked down some details on the dress itself – a company out of London called CuteCircuit produced the dress for Katy. That garment had over 3,000 LEDs mixed in with all that chiffon!

Below – a video of Katy in the dress, and below that, two images of Katy in the dress. Tres chic!
Sorry in advance for the 30 second ad at the top of the video, it’s from E!’s website…

Thanks, Go Fug Yourself!

An LED Surgical Headlight Camera System?

A good friend and emergency room doctor asked me one time – “can you design an LED high-output head-mounted fixture that I can use in the ER to look into areas of the body?”  My friend’s question came out of the fact that apparently the existing head-mounted illuminators used in hospitals and doctor’s offices across the world are not necessarily the most convenient of apparatus to use.  Most of them are also not made of LED sources, like this one:

Doesn’t this seem like a perfect opportunity for a high output cold white LED?

As I look at this image above that I got via a trade publication in the medical industry, I have to wonder what a high power source like Xenon is doing being used in an application like this when LED tech could easily be utilized.  LEDs are also being used in several facets of the medical industry, including some of the large medical tasklights found in operating rooms and examination rooms.

Looking at this design, I had to ask myself why an S-video connection and composite is being used to send camera data instead of something digital like DVI or HDMI.  Obviously there is no audio in this setup nor would there need to be.  My concern is detail – if you’re looking at parts of the body that need examining after the fact, wouldn’t the best idea be to have your device outputting something HD?  I’m probably looking at this medical technology and wondering how I could incorporate it into entertainment lighting or some effed up fascination like that.

My guess is that an LED source would make the cost of this device a hell of a lot less expensive, too.  It would certainly last a lot longer!

Don’t worry, Welch Allyn, I’m not picking on you!

Does This LED Middle Finger Count as Road Rage?

I get a metric ton of emails from LED manufacturing companies located all over the world.  You know the ones – if you’ve ever done a search on Google for “lighting” or entered your email address into a subscription list, you’ve probably gotten spammed with something like this:

Dear Sir:

It has been long time for communication with you.  at the beginning of 2010, we have launched some new led bulb and lightings.

You can visit our website to download our 2010 catalogue, [website address redacted]

If you want to download, please contact me to get the account to download the files.

[name redacted]
Dreamy Lighting Co., LTD

Normally these come with some kind of PDF full of blatant copies of good brands like Martin’s Mac 2000, along with LED striplights, wall washers, and other inexpensive LED lighting.  It’s been this way with manufacturers in this area for many years – when white LED manufacturing made its debut, companies bombarded the world with cheap quality and cost white LED products.  When CFLs got huge, same thing.

Sometimes the products (and English translations) are absolutely ridiculous, and sometimes it is overwhelmingly hilarious.  I just got one from a company (that I shall not name because they CONSTANTLY SPAM ME) that had a pretty funny product being advertised – an LED sign for the inside of your car that sends visual messages to the car behind you, up to and including the middle finger.  Meet the “CAR Emotion Light”:

What a phenomenally hilarious idea.  Note the middle finger  icon that you can display in gleaming red LED light for your already late for dinner angry road raging Hummer driver you just cut off.

Epic win.

Aron Altmark Rocks TheDailyCity.com’s Mobile Art Show

You see, Aron Altmark is a young guy I know – a lighting designer, student, and artist.  Aron is doing something right now that a pretty small handful of really talented young people are doing.  Aron is turning light, art, and his big geek brain into something that he can feel good about – and he’s involving the public in his exploits so that the world can see how great it is to be a geek.

It’s a shame – there are fewer true “geeks” in the world right now, and today’s college-age people as a majority are becoming less geekified.  What’s with that, people?

Aron just turned TheDailyCity.com’s “Mobile Art Show” into an interactive piece of art.  The Mobile Art Show is a pretty cool thing that The Daily City is doing around Orlando.  Think of it as a portable studio so that artists can sell their work – a U-Haul bobtail truck, parked in different places in the city.  Aron thought totally differently than the norm on this – instead of thinking inside the box[truck], Aron decided to literally go outside the box – turning the truck’s exterior into a projection surface for his real-time “Laser Graffiti.”  Aron’s work is an interactive light projection that tracks the movement of a laser on a surface.  That’s right.  What did you do today?

Aron’s work is forging himself a place in the future – this is what happens when you apply yourself.  Aron, we’re expecting pretty big stuff outta you, kid!  Great work.  I wanna see you conquer OpenFrameworks and Processing.

Check out the rest of Aron’s work on his Picasa account.  Thanks, Aron!

Super Bowl Halftime Show – Starring The Who, and THE LIGHTING!

I just heard on NPR last night that 106.5 million plus people watched the Super Bowl on Sunday – more people than any other event on TV in the history of the world.  The last thing that had that kind of viewers was the final episode of M*A*S*H*, back in 1983 – 105.97 million.

(for those of you kids who have no idea what M*A*S*H* is, it was a show about surgeons in a war zone)

One of the things that is still getting some major press is the big spectacle half time show, starring The Who:

For those of you who are like me, I paid more attention to the lighting design for the Super Bowl half time show than I did The Who – I mean, don’t get me wrong, I think they rock.  They did at least when they were younger.  Who did rock this time was the lighting design team and suppliers for one of the biggest shows of the year – and the rumor is that the entire rig had a total of six minutes to get on the field and working.

Oh – and pre-viz/lighting design for the Super Bowl Half Time Show?  It was done in Cast Software’s wysiwyg Suite!  OH YEAH!  (That’s right, I love it, you love it, and it is the epic awesome.)

The Super Bowl XLIV Lighting Team – definitely not an exhaustive list, and my apologies for the hundreds of people who got left off the list:

Lighting Designers:  Al Gurdon
Designer:  Bruce Rodgers of Tribe
Lighting Directors:  Bob Barnhart and David Grill of Full Flood
Programmers:  Mike “Oz” Owen, rocking the Vari*Lite Virtuoso, and Pete Radice
Rental Company:  PRG USA and PRG Europe
Lighting Crew Chief/Gaffer:  Richie Gorrod
Media Programmer:  Jason Rudolph

An update from Jason Rudolph himself – thanks a lot, Jason!

Lee Lodge was the creative producer handling content, which was made by Loyal Kaspar out of NYC.
XL video was the video vendor. The stage was made of 3000+ MiStrips, driven by 2 HD hippos provided by VER, Matt Waters was the server tech.

From XL Video, Ken Gay and Bob McGee were the project managers. Mike Spencer was the system engineer. Luke Pilato was the head system tech. Led techs were Rodrigo Azuriz, Trace Deroy, Douglas Eldredge, David Imlau, Fernando Gutierrez Llama, Curtis Luxton, Stephen Otten, Eric Petty, Rod Silhanek and Don Stevens.

An update from Margaret, who sends the URL of Loyal Kaspar, the company who did the video content – http://www.loyalkaspar.com

Update - Jason Rudolph writes back (Feb 11, 2010) [Thanks, Jason!]

I can tell you this, the LED fixtures in the rig were Color Blocks, most of the fixtures were VL3500 wash units with the clear lens installed, on the stage were Color Blasts, and Iwhite color blasts.  Atomic strobes all over, and a few lightning strikes for good measure.  There were also a few Alpha Beam 1500s in the rig, but I’m not sure where they were.

Oz programmed on a Virtuoso VX, I was on a DX2.

We had 2 HD hippos, and one HippoCritter for pixelmapping the Color blocks, which we only used for one song, its output was merged with the console output so that we had both as an option.

If you know any people who worked the crew, give them a shout out in the comments – what a terrific job they did!

I am expecting an equipment list soon – I will update this post as soon as I get it from my source.  But for those of you who didn’t get to see this amazing lighting feat, below are two videos, part one and part two, of the half time show.  Enjoy!

(Thanks, Times Online, for the image of The Who!)

Imogen Heap’s Tweeting Dress – The Twitdress

Do you remember Moritz Waldemeyer?  He’s the guy who built Bono his crazy laser jacket for the 360 Tour. Moritz is an amazing designer – he’s designed illuminated clothing and all kinds of crazy stuff for many famous people – Rihanna, the band OK GO, Michael Jackson, and the Black Eyed Peas to name a few.

His newest “thing” is a dress made for Imogen Heap to wear at the Grammy Awards – LED flexible fabric, with an interface designed by MSA Visuals that displays tweets and photos in real time coming from the web.  Awesome!

From the Times Online:

Heap, who composes her songs at home in Essex, attended the ceremony in a “Twitter dress”. At first sight her self-made outfit consisted of an oversized necklace studded with flashing lights and a transparent handbag that doubled up as a television. In fact, the necklace was a digital sign displaying messages that her fans were writing on to her Twitter profile. Those tweets were relayed to her jewellery through a wireless router — equipment that provides an internet connection — embedded inside her black dress.

Check out some images and a video:

A video of Imogen and her dress a-tweeting: