Knight of Illumination Awards IS A BLAST! You Going?

I saw this yesterday from awesome lady of lighting media Sarah Rushton-Read, about the upcoming Knights of Illumination Awards at the PLASA Show in October 2015 — seriously, if you’re going to PLASA and haven’t done a KoI, you’re missing out.  It is some seriously fun stuff, hands down!

I really really REALLY hope I get to PLASA this year…  it might be ruby slipper clicking time because I haven’t been able to see my UK peeps in so long.


The Knight of Illumination Awards 2015 has lift off 

UK – The 2015 Knight of Illumination Awards (KOI) has launched and submissions are already coming in for Television and Concert Touring and Events.

This year marks the 8th KOI Awards, which celebrates the creative talents of international lighting and digital content designers working in the UK in the sectors of TV, Theatre and Concert Touring and Events.

With a new award category in Concert Touring and Events for smaller club venues this year’s KOI will widen its reach to celebrate LDs from all stages and scales of touring. Concert Touring and Events is also welcoming a new member of the judging panel in the form of respected Total Production International Magazine editor, Kelly Murray,

Submissions are open for the Television and Concert Touring and Events categories and shows performed or broadcast between 1st August 2014 and 31st July 2015 in the UK are eligible. As with previous years the Theatre section can only be nominated by the judging panel.

Crucially, KOI continues to run as a pan industry event supported by the generous sponsorship of businesses operating across the industry. Award winning lighting designer and coordinator of the KOI awards Durham Marenghi explains: “In eight years KOI has established itself as a much coveted lighting and video industry award, respected for truly celebrating the art and creativity of lighting, video and show design. In fact so successful has the event been that last year it was referred to by the Guardian newspaper, in an article that detailed the creative value a lighting designer can bring to the overall production process.”

The KOI Awards was conceived and is organised by lighting manufacturer, Clay Paky, along with the STLD (Society of Television Lighting Designers), the ALD (Association of Lighting Designers) and Durham and Jennie Marenghi.

This year’s awards event will be produced and managed by The Fifth Estate Ltd, which also handles KOI’s marketing and PR. As in previous years the Awards will be generously sponsored by a broad spectrum of manufacturing and service businesses connected to the lighting industry and kindly supported by important industry organisations and the press.

Today, the KOI Awards continues to forge ever-closer ties between lighting and video designers – at all stages of their careers – and the lighting and digital content design industry as a whole.

A panel of industry experts assesses each sector of the awards and submissions can be made for TV and Concert Touring by visiting the KOI Website. The shortlists will be announced in early September.

In addition The Enrico Caironi Lifetime Recognition Award will be presented to an individual who’s passion for the industry has gone above and beyond the call of duty, in turn benefiting their colleagues, the industry and the wider world.

Last year’s winners included: Paul Keogan, Joachim Klein, Andy Purves, Adam Silverman, Ethan Wang for Theatre; David Higgs, Chris Rigby, Hugh French, Ben Cracknell, and Luke Halls for Television; Will Potts, Andy Hurst, Matt Button and Paul ‘Pablo’ Beckett, Blue Leach and Cate Carter for Concert Touring and Events. The winner for Lifetime Achievement was Brian Croft.

To find out more about the sectors and subcategories or information on how you can submit an entry for television, theatre or concert touring and event lighting and visual content please visit:

www.knight-of-illumination. com/categories

For more information and to make a submission for Concert Touring and Events or Television please visit the KOI website and social media sites at:

Facebook: knight.of.illumination
Twitter: KOIAwards

About KOI:

The Knight of Illumination Awards provides public recognition for outstanding achievements in Lighting Design by Lighting Designers working on productions in the UK.
The Awards for “The Knight of the Illumination” are nominated and judged by a panel of professional reviewers working in the specific categories and the ceremony takes place annually in the autumn in London. Recommends the ROGUE R2 Spot for the 2014 Parnelli Awards!


Ok, I’m blown away by this fixture, and I want to ask you, the readership, for your help in nominating this piece of lighting awesomesauce.  Meet the ROGUE R2 Spot from CHAUVET Professional, a fixture I’ve had the chance to rock on several occasions:

Check out the ROGUE R2 Spot microsite!

It has to be said, I work for CHAUVET Professional as many of you know, but no one asked me to do this or is paying me to do anything.  This is the first moving head I helped to get out into the world, and I am ever, ever so proud to work on this amazing team of engineers, developers, and industry experts.  I truly think that the ROGUE R2 Spot is one bad mamajama — it’s THE bright, quick, accurate, and fully-featured LED moving head gaining traction all over the world.  I’ve been fortunate enough in my career to see and play with pretty much every moving head out there, and the ROGUE series pretty much rocks my face.

GO HERE to nominate the ROGUE R2 Spot for this year’s 2014 Parnelli Indispensable Technology Awards.  I’m hanging my reputation on this one folks, it’s one of the coolest things I’ve ever had the chance to work on, to see born right before my eyes.

GET OUT THE VOTE!  Thanks for playing, everyone!  If all else fails, tell ’em JimOnLight sent you!

2010 LIGHT AWARDS: the RENT-A-GOBO Program from InLight Gobos

I’ve decided to award some credit to where credit is due in my humble lighting opinion to some companies, products, and people across the year 2010 who have wow’ed me to no end.  I did a lot of work in 2010, and that work was made possible by fantastic companies and products that allowed me to create lighting without being hindered by poor workmanship or development.

The first of the 2010 LIGHT AWARDS goes to InLight Gobos for their RENT-A-GOBO program!

CONGRATULATIONS!  InLight Gobos, you saved my rear end by providing me with high quality custom glass gobos at a ridiculously awesome rental price for a production of The Light in the Piazza in the fall of 2010.  The problem I had was the need to incorporate some colored projections into a few of the scenes in The Light in the Piazza to accentuate a certain mood – at one point, Clara has a mental breakdown while looking for Fabrizio in a night time scene.

The InLight Gobos RENT-A-GOBO selection is colorful and vibrant – and I did not have the money in the budget to buy full-color patterns for the show.  As much of a bummer as this might have been at the time, this is why Rick Hutton created the idea of renting glass gobos for productions.  I have to believe that most of the people reading this blog have the same problem at one time or another, right?

InLight Gobos’ RENT-A-GOBO #BAB-003 – “Organism Color” – was my problem solver for this design challenge:

and the corresponding scene using the RENT-A-GOBO templates:

I also used InLight Gobos’ RENT-A-GOBO #BAB-128 – “Liquid” – for a nice textured breakup in several parts of the production:

I want to give a heart felt THANK YOU to InLight Gobos for allowing me to work within my budget and still produce art that I felt good about by renting glass gobos.  I could not have done this without your great glass rental gobos!

People, if you find yourself in this situation, I *highly* recommend checking out the RENT-A-GOBO Program through InLight Gobos in Dallas, Texas.  Rick’s work is the best on the market.  Now you can rent glass gobos to help your already tight production budgets.  Check out a capture from the InLight Gobos website of the RENT-A-GOBO selection:

Congratulations, InLight Gobos.  You’re the first winner of a 2010 LIGHT AWARD!

Check out my production photos from The Light in the Piazza – we toured this show to a venue in Arkansas as well, with rave reviews!  Click on a thumbnail below, and a gallery view pops up!

Tony Awards for Lighting Design in 2010 – Some Detail On the Designers

I have to admit that apparently since I didn’t watch the Tony Awards last night, I am apparently a bad theatre person.  Or so I’m told.  You see, I’m actually lighting a show and making a paycheck right now, so I didn’t have a chance to sit and watch the Tony Awards show.  Did you watch, or are you baaaad like me?

The big lighting design awards last night were Best Lighting Design for a Play, and Best Lighting Design for a Musical.  In the PLAY category, the Tony was awarded to Neil Austin for Red by John Logan; in the MUSICAL category, the Tony was awarded to Kevin Adams for American Idiot by Billie Joe Armstrong from Green Day and Michael Mayer.

Best Lighting Design for a Play: Red (Golden Theatre) by John Logan, lighting design by Neil Austin

Neil Austin – the LD behind the show:

Production images of Red:

(All images from Johan Persson, from the Neil Austin website)

About Red (from the Tony Award website):

Master American expressionist Mark Rothko (Alfred Molina) has just landed the biggest commission in the history of modern art. But when his young assistant (Eddie Redmayne) gains the confidence to challenge him, Rothko faces the agonizing possibility that his crowning achievement could also become his undoing. John Logan’s play is a searing portrait of an artist’s ambition and vulnerability as he tries to create a definitive work for an extraordinary setting.

Producers: Arielle Tepper Madover, Stephanie P. McClelland, Matthew Byam Shaw, Neal Street, Fox Theatricals, Ruth Hendel/Barbara Whitman, Philip Hagemann/Murray Rosenthal, The Donmar Warehouse

The images from the show are amazing.  From a few people who emailed me today to tell me about the show, it was also apparently equally amazing, and Austin’s work is stellar.

Best Lighting Design for a Musical: American Idiot (Berkeley Rep) by Billie Joe Armstrong and Michael Mayer, Lighting Design by Kevin Adams

Kevin Adams, LD behind American Idiot:

Production images from American Idiot, from Kevin Adams’ website:

From the Tony Awards website about American Idiot:

American Idiot tells the exhilarating story of a new generation of young Americans as they struggle to find meaning in a post-9/11 world, in a journey borne along by songs of the band Green Day. The musical follows working-class characters from the suburbs to the city to the Middle East, as they seek redemption in a world filled with frustration. The cast of 19 is led by past Tony Award-winner John Gallagher, Jr.

Producers: Tom Hulce & Ira Pittelman, Ruth and Steven Hendel, Vivek J. Tiwary and Gary Kaplan, Aged in Wood and Burnt Umber, Scott Delman, Latitude Link, HOP Theatricals and Jeffrey Finn, Larry Welk, Bensinger Filerman and Moellenberg Taylor, Allan S. Gordon/Élan V. McAllister, Berkeley Repertory Theatre, Awaken Entertainment, John Pinckard and John Domo

You’ve probably heard of Kevin Adams, if not Neil Austin too.  Kevin Adams got some press on last year for his design for Passing Strange (which has become one of my favorite designs ever).  I ran across an article in Live Design that asked Kevin five questions – this was my favorite two – students and people wanting to break into the lighting design industry, pay attention:

Live Design:  What is the best career advice you’ve ever been given?

Kevin Adams:  I was never really interested in a “career,” so I never really asked for career advice. I realized early on that employment as a freelancer was always going to be up and down, so I’ve tried to make every day less about working and more about making things that, at the end of the day, satisfy me. And if other people respond to the work I make, then great.

Live Design:  And what’s the worst?

Kevin Adams: Probably telling myself that a “career” doesn’t matter.

Amazing.  I hope this gives a little bit of insight into the Best Lighting Design category of the Tony Awards.  It is so important to me that people know more than just who won the award!

Happy Birthday, James Clerk Maxwell!

Hey, is that James Clerk Maxwell?  HAPPY BIRTHDAY, James Clerk Maxwell (13 June 1831 – 5 November 1879)!

There’s just something about the people like James Clerk Maxwell and their crazy beards.  It’s like a birds’ nest for your chin!

So, Jimmy Max here is a pretty important dude.  James was a theoretical mathematician and physicist – If you’ve ever heard of or practiced the modern electromagnetic theory, you have heard of James Clerk Maxwell.  Many people consider James as important as Albert Einstein and Michael Faraday – besides his big ol’ brain, I’m jealous of his amazing chin coiffure.  GO BEARDS!

Jimmy Max’s life was quite interesting.  He was home schooled by his mother, he got tired of his toys when he was 6 or 7 and started playing with reflecting plates of metal and studied frogs’ life cycles, and unfortunately his mom died after an operation when he was 8.  James was raised by his dad and sister-in-law Jane, educated by an unknown 16-year old boy who treated James like a bother.  Since James was raised on his father’s country estate in solitude most of the time after his mother’s death, his school experiences were apparently harsh and full of ridicule.  James was more intelligent than his teachers and fellow students, which also probably didn’t help things much.

James’ scientific career began pretty early.  From Wikipedia:

Maxwell was fascinated by geometry at an early age, rediscovering the regular polyhedron before any formal instruction. Much of his talent went unnoticed however, and, despite winning the school’s scripture biography prize in his second year, his academic work remained unremarkable, until, at the age of 13, he won the school’s mathematical medal, and first prizes for English and poetry.

For his first scientific work, at the age of only 14, Maxwell wrote a paper describing a mechanical means of drawing mathematical curves with a piece of twine, and the properties of ellipses and curves with more than two foci. His work, “Oval Curves”, was presented to the Royal Society of Edinburgh byJames Forbes, professor of natural philosophy at Edinburgh University, Maxwell deemed too young for the task. The work was not entirely original,Descartes having examined the properties of such multifocal curves in the seventeenth century, though Maxwell had simplified their construction.

In addition to, you know, developing the theory of electromagnetism, James Clerk Maxwell developed some other pretty interesting scientific developments.  From above, his work with geometry and multi-focal curves lead to developments in optics and color vision.  One area that I found particularly interesting was his work with photographic images and color.  A photograph of a tartan ribbon was taken three times with the first single-lens reflex (SLR) camera developed by Thomas Sutton, each photograph with a different color filter placed in front of the lens – red, blue, and green.  Then, by projecting each of these colored images on top of one another with three separate projectors, James created a full-color image.  Check it out:

Another pretty interesting development that James brought about was the Maxwell Disc.  James’s color wheel disc was very similar to James Forbes’ spinning color discs – you know, the ones that have three colors on them, and when you spin the disc, the color appears as a single color?  James Maxwell’s color disc had three very tuned colors (vermillion red, emerald green, and ultramarine blue).  This is a very simple explanation of Jimmy Max’s color wheel top – however, his work helped to develop the 1931 CIE color space.  He had his hands in all kinds of stuff!

Maxwell, as a young pup, with his color wheel:

Maxwell’s Color Triangle – look familiar?

Maxwell’s Equations and Electromagnetism

James Clerk Maxwell developed the theory of electromagnetism, and Maxwell’s Equations are the basis of this theory:

Classical Electromagnetism, which is these four laws plus Lorentz’ Law (the law that can be applied to make a current-carrying object levitate between two magnetic fields), is what James Clerk Maxwell is credited with developing.  Of course others helped in this work, but Maxwell is credited with the bulk of the development.

Have you seen these laws?  They are freaking beautiful, especially if you like math like me:

Or, if you like humor:

One last thing – our man James was a poet!  He wrote all kinds of poetry, but my favorite was his mathematical poetry.  Here’s one for the road:

Energies through the ether flow,
Waves travel to and fro,
And with a ratio
Their speed you measure.
Colours yield their secret hue,
And Saturn’s rings subdued by you
Suggest that gases
Might be measured too.

Science you freed
From cramping mechanistic creed,
And by your theory brought
The elastic solid ether to naught,
And changed the axiomatic basis
Of scientific thought.

Oh Maxwell! How can I declaim
On such a genius, such a fame,
And speak of one so very wise
Who saw the world through splendid eyes,
And though of such a subtle mind
Was yet so humorous and kind?
Yours was a mind unique and rare
That, nurtured in a northern air,
Struck out new paths in many ways
Through all too short, yet fruitful days.
How can one capture in a line
Something so great, so pure, so fine?

Give thanks,
That such a man drew breath,
And lament with all the world
His early death.

Happy Birthday, Jimmy Max!

Thanks Wikipedia, St. Andrews, and Sonnet Software!

The Live Design Excellence Awards – Voting is Open!

Live Design Online is hosting the 2010 Live Design Excellence Awards, as in previous years.  The award governs a selection of genres of individual design, and voters have been given an array of projects on which to vote.  The Live Design Online website has information on each of these projects – check them out before you vote!  I think I know people on at least half of these projects – which makes my vote even more difficult!

From Live Design Online’s Excellence Awards website (which is where you need to go to vote!):

The following pages contain the nominees for outstanding individual achievement in design for projects occurring from September 2008 to October 2009. These awards represent an opportunity for industry professionals to be recognized among their peers.

One winning project will be chosen in each of the following categories; please select one project in each category below. Winners will be featured in the May issue of Live Design and will be honored at the Broadway Master Classes that same month.

Grand Opening Of Atlantis
Pretend City’s Children’s Museum

Exile Perfect Live 2008 Tour
Essence Awards 2009

Corporate Event:
Rolex Mentor And Protégé Gala At Hamlyn Hall Royal Opera House
Two Millennia Of Heroism

Live for Broadcast:
Junior Eurovision Song Contest
Grant Park Election Night Rally

Theatre Production:
Swan Lake At San Francisco Ballet
Rooms, A Rock Romance

Venues (Club or Lounge):
Freight & Salvage
Blaze Nightclub On Royal Caribbean’s Oasis Of The Seas

Venues (Theatre or Performance):
The Joint By Rouge
Jerome Robbins Theatre At Baryshnikov Arts Center

Check out last year’s Excellence Awards winners – some amazing works!

Lady GaGa’s Brit Awards Performance

Okay, to be honest, I’ve not really heard much of her music until I saw this video.  Lady GaGa performed her tunes “Telephone” and “Dance in the Dark” at the Brit Awards recently.  It’s the one where she gave thanks to Alexander McQueen, the fashion designer who just passed away.

Al Gurdon (Super Bowl LD) designed the lighting for that performance, and Miguel Ribiero from PRG created the wysiwyg for the performance.  Gentlemen, what a kick-ass job you did.  Congratulations on that work.

Check this out:


Honey, where’s my car ke-OMG, IS THAT THOMAS ALVA EDISON?  HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Thomas Alva Edison!  DUDE!  It’s the “Wizard of Menlo Park!!!”

(actually Tommy’s birthday was yesterday, but I had a gig and I was gone all day so don’t say anything) TOMMAAAAAY!

So, those of you who know Tommy A. Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) probably know him for, um, INVENTING THE LIGHT BULB and all.  Tommy Boy and Joseph Swan actually battled it out death-match style on the invention of the light bulb (we all know who it really was), but it turned out that Mr. Edison here was the better businessman and capitalist.  I mean, look at that face – doesn’t it just scream “you can make all the rules you want, I will make money in spite of them” on his face?

Tommy Edison was actually quite the inventor.  He started out as a telegraph operator (apparently termed “brass pounder”) and persevered through some tough times financially to become the holder of almost 1100 patents.  The motion picture camera, the “quadruplex” telegraph, the carbon microphone (in the first telephones) and, among many others, a patent for the “carbonized bamboo” filament.  Joseph Swan was the first actual inventor of the electric lamp, but Edison’s design and research actually turned out a better, more efficient version.  Edison’s bamboo filament was said to burn for over 1,200 hours.  That’s more than some lamps I’ve bought at the store this year!

Big Tom Edison’s also accredited for the invention and design of the phonograph – the “record” player, for any of you crazy kids who don’t actually know what this is.  (I wanted to cry when a young student in Arlington, TX asked me “what this thing is” while holding a turntable in her arms)

Check out a video of Edison reciting his first recording, a voicing of “Mary Had A Little Lamb” in 1927:

Also, another very, very hip video is Edison talking about his invention, the “electric light bulb” and its development:

One thing that Thomas Edison did that is essential to our development as a technically adept species was to implement and develop a mass-production system for industrial operations.  That bit of knowledge he imparted to the industrial trades is revolutionary.  He is also credited with creating the first industrial research laboratory, in Menlo Park, New Jersey.  This place had a little bit of everything – Edison wanted to store some of “almost every conceivable material” in this place so that he and his people could invent freely with no inhibitions.  The Menlo Park facility took two city blocks to house.  Holy geekfest – that must have been almost as awesome as the Mythbusters Studios!

Edison’s Menlo Park lab:

To be fair, there are a couple of pretty un-awesome things that Edison did that are noteworthy, one of which led to the development of the electric chair.  George Westinghouse was one of Edison’s competitors, and probably most well known for alternating current.  Edison and Westinghouse had a pretty fierce and nasty battle over whose invention was better – direct current (Edison) or alternating current (Westinghouse).  In the “War of Currents” that ensued, Tom Edison was so persistent on proving that Westinghouse’s AC was unsafe (regardless of the fact that it was actually better than his DC for long-distance distribution).  Edison and his people publicly electrocuted animals to show that AC essentially killed them quickly.  Yeah, Tommy, that wasn’t very cool of you, dude.  One notable execution was Topsy the Elephant – a Coney Island attraction that killed three abusive handlers over the course of three years.  Edison filmed this event – I didn’t feel good about embedding it in this post, so here’s a link to it, via a post about Topsy the Elephant.  That video on the site is not terribly graphic or anything, but it’s freaky in its own right.  I’d kill somebody that was abusing me like they did you, Topsy.

Topsy was electrocuted with a 6,600VAC source.  Maybe AC triumphed over DC in the long run because of some bad karma Thomas brought on with his war on alternating current.

Thomas Edison was attributed with the following quote, which kinda cracks me up after reading the above research:

The dove is my emblem…. I want to save and advance human life, not destroy it…. I am proud of the fact that I never invented weapons to kill…

So, enough pointing out a man’s flaws on his birthday – thanks for all of the good things you did, Thomas Alva Edison!  Just a few more things we can thank Tommy Boy here for (a non-exhaustive list):

  • the fluoroscope (an x-ray that takes radioscopic images)
  • the stock ticker (well, okay, but really who needs that?)
  • the Lackawanna Railroad’s electric trains (Hoboken to Gladstone, Montclair, and Dover, NJ)
  • Edison General Electric
  • the printing telegraph
  • Typewriting machines (and all kinds of associated parts and pieces)
  • the magnetic ore separator
  • brakes for electromagnetic motors
  • a patent for preserving fruit
  • governors for electric motors
  • the telephone (and other related stuff)
  • the arc lamp
  • a gold extracting process from sulphide ores (random…)
  • wireless telegraphy

Thanks Tommy!  If you ever come back to life, I’m buying the first beer.  If you come back to life as a zombie, I ain’t promising nothing.

Just as something to watch that explains a little more about Edison’s involvement with the Electric Chair, here’s a copy of The Pinky Show – “Thomas Edison Hates Cats.”  There is a tiny clip of Topsy’s execution in there, so just be warned.  The video is, however, presented by a talking cat:

Thanks, Wikipedia, Worldwide School, and Thomas Edison!

ETC Wins A PLASA 2009 Award for Innovation for the Selador Line!


Electronic Theatre Controls, maker of the Source Four line of luminaires and the Ion, Eos, Congo, and Express lines of control consoles, won a PLASA 2009 Award for Innovation at this year’s conference for the Selador line of LED fixtures.  Congratulations, ETC!

The press release from the ETC newsroom:

Lighting, dimming and controls manufacturer ETC is celebrating after winning a coveted Innovation Award for the Selador LED range of fixtures at this year’s PLASA.

The award judges congratulated the ETC Selador fixtures for “taking a significant step towards the ultimate goal of energy efficient incandescent replacement lighting.” They continued by pointing out that “ETC has developed this LED fixture with a colour output that gets close to the spectral curve of traditional incandescent source, thereby making LED technology a step closer to wider use in theatres and similar applications.”

Outside of the awards, the PLASA show was, says ETC’s Promotions & Advertising Manager for Europe, Rosi Marx, a complete success, with product specialists giving demonstrations throughout the four days. “Although visitor numbers seemed to be down, in general we had a very busy stand,” she adds.

The Selador demonstrations weren’t the only ones grabbing visitors’ attention: ETC’s Unison Mosaic architectural control system, SmartBar 2 portable dimming and Element lighting control console were all extremely popular.

Element is ETC’s newest lighting desk and is designed with smaller theatrical venues and schools in mind. This no-fuss system targets conventional lighting control in smaller venues. Perfect for student and volunteer staff, Element redefines the basics of lighting control. When conventional accessories, LED fixtures or moving lights are added to the rig, the press of a button accesses the On Demand ML Controls, giving direct control of complex devices via a mouse or touch screen.

I’m looking forward to what’s next with Selador!


WYSIWYG Wins A PLASA 2009 Award for Innovation!


Our beloved WYSIWYG won a PLASA Award for Innovation at Earl’s Court in London this last weekend – a well-deserved win for both Cast Lighting (and everyone who busts their rears there) and all of us WYSIWYG users.  WYSIWYG Release 24 has amazing real-time viz.  Amazing.  Render-quality amazing.  I am a fan after all, but I’ve used so many software suites over the years (from MiniCAD to Vectorworks to AutoCAD to SoftPlot to AGI32 to DiaLUX to Sketchup to you name it, I think I’ve used it), and as a lighting designer in no matter what genre of lighting, I still love my WYSIWYG.

From the PLASA Show website:

Cast Group of Companies, for the WYSIWYG R24. The plethora of LED display technology caused Cast to re-evaluate its design and visualisation software which has led to a significant redesign of the graphics engine and fixture attributes. It now allows the full visualisation of modern display technology including video and LED screens and their content.

From Entertainment Technology News:

From among 62 products entered, last night CAST Software walked away with a coveted PLASA09 Award for Innovation at Earls Court in London. The Award “recognises products which advance the industry by demonstrating a new style of thinking, improving technical practice, or taking a key step forward in terms of safety,” according to the Professional Lighting And Sound Association.

The Award was presented by Adam Afriyie MP, Shadow Minister for Innovation, Universities and Skills and was judged by a panel of eight independent judges drawn from across the industry. In making the Award, the judges explained: “the plethora of LED display technology caused CAST to re-evaluate its design and visualisation software which has led to a significant redesign of the graphics engine and fixture attributes. It now allows the full visualisation of modern display technology including video and LED screens and their content.”

Bruce Freeman, chairman of CAST Software and Gil Densham, president, accepted the Award at which time Freeman said, “WYSIWYG R24 is a total bottom-up rethink that delivers advances so revolutionary that they are ahead of the leading-edge! To assure that the system demands of the new features and visualisation in R24 are met with the same WYSIWYG speed and dependability, CAST designed and built a brand new proprietary engine. Now production professionals can model all the hottest new LED fixtures on a per diode basis and display them running in realtime. R24’s new visualisation incorporates the inverse square law feature and volumetric beams so WYSIWYG’s realtime Shaded View is really virtually real!”

Congratulations, Cast!