Pink Floyd’s Lighting Designer, Arthur Max, Has A Bad Day on Headset – in 1973

arthur-max-has-a-bad-day

It’s the day before Independence Day off here in the USA.

There is nothing you’re doing right now that can’t wait for 11 minutes while you watch Arthur Max at the office while working a 1973 Pink Floyd show in Detroit — the venue ruled that Pink Floyd had to use the Union spot ops from the venue instead of the Pink Floyd crew, and with some animation, this is one of the best things you’ll see today!  Thanks to Cliff Port, a fan filmmaker that really got a good belly laugh out of me today!

You know who Arthur Max is, right?  He’s a production designer and artist who does a ton of movies now, but lit Floyd back in the day along with working for Bill Graham at the Filmore East.  From IMDB:

A native New Yorker who worked as a Stage Lighting Designer in the late 1960s and early 1970s in the music industry, and then, after studying architecture in England and Italy, went on to do several architectural design projects in London. He entered British film as an assistant to several British Production Designers in the mid-1980s. First for Stuart Craig on Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes and Cal (both 1984) and then for Ashetton Gorton on Revolution (1985). His Production Design career began withTV commercials during the years 1985-1995 for many different Directors, including Ridley Scott and David Fincher, with whom he would go on to collaborate on feature films.

This is so awesome, I think I may just watch it again.

HUGE thanks to Simone Kay’s YouTube channel!

Must Watch Short: Luminaris

Juan Pablo Zaramella’s stop motion short Luminaris has won my heart! The film effortlessly dives you in to a world controlled by light, and one man’s big ideas about that.

It is absolutely wondrous.

Below is the trailer. There are also two behind the scenes videos online showing the tests Zaramella performed with light and stop motion, but please watch the film first! If you won’t heed my spoiler warning, though… click here.

LUMINARIS (Trailer) from Juan Pablo Zaramella on Vimeo.

Beware! The Blob

While not a 1970s scifi horror flick, Sunday Paper‘s spectacular short film Light is certainly haunting. For a fascinating and beautiful minute and a half short film, it certainly carries an elegiac note.

 

 

Just watch it!

 

Light from Sunday Paper on Vimeo.

 

Curioser and Curioser

Curious Displays from Julia Tsao on Vimeo.

Julia Tsao’s Curious Displays are just plain neat! The proposal for a display that goes beyond set dimensions and aspect ratio is in itself fascinating, but then the augmented reality functionality shown in section 2 shows a whole new level of possibility. I would just LOVE to get my hands dirty programming some art on these little buggers!

My God, It’s Full of Stars! What You See When Your Eyes are Closed – Phosphenes

As much as I love light, I love to close my eyes and stare at the back of my eyelids.  Have you ever noticed how amazing, how beautiful the events that occur are when you rub your eyes and notice the instant star and explosion show that occurs in your vision?  I always imagine it as I’m looking into the birth of a universe – each time I stare at my eyelids I see little exploding stars that each take about 2-3 seconds to fully ignite, explode, and become part of the other stars waiting for me to focus my gaze on them.  Try it, it’s a lot of fun!  It is for me, at least.  Perhaps I’m nutso.  Still, AWESOME!

These little events are called entopic phenomena, meaning that they come directly from the eye itself.  I’m pretty sure everyone’s experienced the most common form of entopic phenomena, eye floaters.  Right?

 

Eye floaters, whether or not they have a sarcastic retort like the ones in Family Guy, are entopic phenomena.

The light that you see when you don’t see any light – whether it’s the random star birth and death that I see when I close my eyes, or if I rub my eyes, or any of a few things that trigger it for me – are called phosphenes.  That word is from two greek words, phos (light) and phainein (to show), and goes to explain most of the “hey there is light in my vision but there’s no source” mysteries.  The phrase “seeing stars,” like from getting whacked in the head or from being dizzy is phosphenic.  When people are deprived of light for long periods of time, phosphenes occur in the person’s vision as well – this is referred to as “the prisoner’s cinema.”  Isn’t that just creepy and horrible?  Apparently phosphenes can occur through several methods, from strong magnetic fiends, to just rubbing your eyes, to reports of astronauts seeing them when exposed to radiation in space.

Here’s a good account of the Prisoner’s Cinema, which also happens apparently to truck drivers, pilots, and other folk who have to concentrate on something for very long periods of time:

It has been widely reported that prisoners confined to dark cells often see brilliant light displays, which is sometimes called the “prisoner’s cinema.” Truck drivers also see such displays after staring at snow-covered roads for long periods, and pilots may experience phosphenes, especially when they are flying alone at high altitudes with a cloudless sky. In fact, whenever there is a lack of external stimuli, these displays can appear. They can also be made at will by simply pressing your fingertips against closed eyelids. In addition, they can also be produced by an electrical shock. In fact, reportedly, it was high fashion in the eighteenth century to have a phosphene party. It is noted that Benjamin Franklin once took part in such an encounter where a circle of people holding hands would be shocked by a high-voltage electrostatic generator, so that phosphenes were created each time the circuit was completed or broken.

The earliest account of phosphenes is given by the Bohemian physiologist Johannes Purkinje in 1819. These subjective images are called phosphenes (from the Greek phos, light, and phainein, to show). Oster (1970) suggests that, because phosphenes originate within the eye and the brain, they are a perceptual phenomenon common to all mankind. The visual areas of the brain at the back of the head (occipital lobe) can also be stimulated to produce phosphenes.

I find these very fascinating, these entropic events.  Do you have them?  How would you describe them?  Please, leave a message in the comments, I am very interested in your phosphene experiences!

Check out this beautiful video representation of phosphene events portrayed artistically.  So pretty!

Thanks to Wikipedia, and again, and Multiple Sclerosis Info, WiseGeek, MadSci, and MotiFake!   

I Have No Idea Where I Found This, But It is Awesome.

Holy crap.  Have you got a few minutes to watch this video?

Do you have some speakers or headphones you can turn on to hear the music associated with the video?

Ok, GO:

Crazy!

About the video:

In Pissenlit, the materials repeatedly self-duplicate, reintegrate and rearrange. These replications, stemming from the original, undergo continuous transformation as units that branch out into infinite variations.
With Pissenlit we tried to show the regularity existing in these seemingly irregular fluctuations, which in time form into a fractural “ring”.

Created by Tsutomu Miyajima, Kouhei Nakama
Music by Jemapur

http://www.wowid.jp

Uppsala, Sweden – Projection Mapping

My good friend Gustavo Vasquez from Mexico City (and currently, Stockholm, Sweden – finishing his Master’s at KTH) sent me this unbelievably cool video of some architectural projection mapping in Uppsala, during the Lighting Festival that occurs in Uppsala, Sweden.

On the video:

“Uppsala castle courtyard is the place where past and future meet. With the help of today’s technology transforms the facade for something completely different. We asked the graphic artist Andrew Cutting Berg trying to get a part of the palace facade to release its centuries of history and for a moment transformed during the long, dark month of November .
The technology used is liquid-cooled encapsulated projectors on either 10 000 ansilumen mounted in heated sheds from Ramirent.

Stage Technologies AVL AB – idea, project management and project supplier
Grafala – animations
Ramirent – delivered the sheds

Happy Monday, folks!

Create Your Own Northern Lights! Ah, Aurora Borealis, You Make Good Web 2.0

Of all the things I didn’t get to do before I left Sweden, the one thing I have to go back to do is to see Aurora Borealis, or the “Northern Lights.”  The phenomenon occurs in our ionosphere when ionized gases (like oxygen and nitrogen) get excited from the solar wind particles coming in.  The result of the excitation of these gases is a photon of light.  So those crazy Star Trek V ribbons of light that you can see in the sky in the polar regions is excited gas bouncing around in the ionosphere.

What this post was actually about was the cool make-your-own-aurora generator that the Visit Norway website has up right now.  Go make your own Northern Lights – pretty cool!

Ludwig Von Drake Teaches About Light and Color – The Spectrum Song

Right off the bat, I have to say thanks to Dean Palmer Jr. on Twitter for tweeting this today – that was the most awesome start to my day in months!

Below is a video that you have to watch – it’s Ludwig Von Drake, the Disney duck who knew something about everything.  I also found another video of Ludwig talking about Color, so I posted that below, too.  Have a great morning, I know I will now!