Something Horribly Wrong is Going On at Wicked Lasers

A quick update on this post:  I did receive my laser after  a long wait.  But it took me getting ahold of the VP of Customer Service to do it.  I am, believe it or not, considering ordering a green laser from them.  I have been assured that the manufacturing and shipping problems have been corrected.  So, for what it’s worth, the laser is pretty awesome.

I’m not into libel or anything – these are hard facts for consumers to make up their own mind before they have to go through the experience that I am currently not enjoying.  However, I feel that with the research that I have, consumers can make up their own minds about future purchases from Wicked Lasers.

I’ve been into lasers for quite some time now, and back in August I decided to get one of Wicked Lasers’ 1W direct diode blue lasers from their China facility.  I am putting together a little laser studio, and I thought that their S3 Spyder Arctic 1W blue would be perfect.  Honestly, it would have been perfect, I think, and with the optics sets that I purchased and the laser shades that I ordered, I would have had a nice laser source to conduct some research!  HOW EXCITING!

Oh, contrare, mo frere.

I ordered the Spyder Arctic, along with their Expanded Optics set, the safety lenses (basically a low-power lens), and some laser goggles.  My order total came to $404.89, which was charged to my card the day I purchased the package, August 24.  On that day, Wicked Lasers’ website stated 3-5 days on shipping.  I had fully planned on rocking the heck out of that laser and optics set that weekend!

Well, here’s where the disappointment comes in – and it’s disappointing because, well, it’s a 1W direct diode blue laser, for under $400! I really, really wanted this for my research and work!

About 8 days after not hearing anything from Wicked Lasers about my purchase, I called the customer service center, apparently located in the United States.  At first glance, no one could locate my order number, so a message was taken to have a senior customer service representative call me back.  Another week went by, no contact, so I called again, got the same thing.  Then I went to the website and saw this – a “new” shipping schedule for the S3 Spyder Arctic:

Okay, suck.  So now 3-5 business days has turned into October 24.  Well, I really, really wanted this laser and optics set, so I put it out of my head and gave Wicked Lasers the benefit of the doubt – my order number was #66XXX, so October 24 it shall be.  However, October 24 had come and gone, and nothing.  I called customer service to find out if perhaps my laser package was stuck in US Customs, but once again, the customer service agent couldn’t locate my order number, so yet another message was forwarded to wherever they keep forwarding these messages that never get returned.

I’ve made a total of eleven calls to the US-based customer service department for Wicked Lasers.  I have had a total number of zero messages returned, even when the agent tells me that they’ve found my number, the status is still “backordered,” and a supervisor will call me within the day.

Starting to seem like a sham yet?  Well, it gets better.  Two days ago (October 26, 2010), I went to check the website to see if there was any more new information about my laser package.  I then find this – a new, revised shipping schedule:

The NEW SCHEDULE now says NOVEMBER 28 for shipping my S3 Spyder Arctic laser.  No one at customer service will return my calls.  Customer service agents keep passing me off, telling me that a supervisor will return my call.  Nothing – not even an email telling me that they’ll ship when they’re damned good and ready, nothing.  How about now?  Seem like a sham now?

So Wicked Lasers, since I’ve heard nothing from anyone, I’m filing a chargeback tomorrow and a fraud report with American Express.  Is anyone else who reads JimOnLight.com having this kind of trouble with Wicked Lasers?

OH – then there was this, on the Wicked Lasers Facebook profile:

Who knows what the hell this is about, but what it looks like is crap.  Shipping numbers posted out of order?  What’s that about?  Also, if this is a hack or something, wouldn’t you think that they’d take it down to stop confusing their customers?

Here’s what I know (which was true at the time of writing this post):

  1. Wicked Lasers let me order a laser and accessories that it seems like they have no intention of shipping to me.
  2. Wicked Lasers also took my money immediately for a product that it appears that they will never be shipping – were this a $5-10 dollar item, I’d just eat it and stop wasting my time, but it was over $400.
  3. I am not the only person dealing with this game of poop.
  4. Wicked Lasers CONTINUES TO ACCEPT ORDERS AND PAYMENT FOR LASERS THEY’RE NOT SHIPPING.
  5. Wicked Lasers will not contact me (or others) back with regards of why we don’t have our packages that were promised October 24.
  6. Customer service is a waste of a phone call, and emails are even worse.

 

 

Horrifying Statistics About Our United States Classroom Experiences

This is barely lighting related, but in my current state of mind, I had to share this with you.  Please join me in making this horrifying group of statistics go away.  Does it surprise you that American students rank among the lowest in the world?

This makes me want to f%$#ing puke.  If you imagine this is the case for general education, can you imagine what these stats must be for lighting education?  Holy crap.

Ugh.  Make it better.

LDI 2010: Candids and Show Floor Shots

Writing this really made my morning, and I hope it brings at least a smile to your face as you browse these candid shots from LDI.  I took about 1200 shots over the 4 days, and I am working on sorting these all out.  I have to say that this was one of the most enjoyable conventions ever – there was something about the vibe this year that was just unbelievably awesome.

Click on an image in the gallery below for a full-sized viewing experience!

LDI 2010: Coemar’s Booth

Another installment of LDI 2010 on JimOnLight.com for those of you who couldn’t attend this year’s show, or just wanted to remember that which you had forgotten because of tequila.

Normally Coemar has one of my favorite booths – it’s always big, bright, and full of moving beam goodness.  I still appreciated the heck out of the Coemar booth, but someone placed a booth right in front of the Coemar booth – so all of the grandioseness of the Coemar experience was kind of hindered by the big truss dodecahedron placed right in the way!

Check out the few shots I got of the Coemar booth at LDI 2010:

LDI 2010: Martin Lighting’s Booth

Sorry for the bit of delay in my first post of the day, I’ve been trying to get Wicked Lasers to tell me why I paid for $400 bucks’ worth of lasers and optics in AUGUST and still haven’t received any product.  Awesome, huh?

Anywho – check out the first post of LDI 2010 highlights – MARTIN LIGHTING’s booth!  It’s always one of my favorites – these booths are often works of art, and I love seeing the new designs each year.  Check out some pics – gotta love those Mac 301s!

Click on any thumbnail to hit the gallery view – each image opens up to full size!

RIP Rutherford the Brave, Super Lumen Kitty

one of the three patented "leia looks"

No one but me probably cares about this, but since it’s my website and all…

Today in 2007, my favorite cat passed away.  His name was Rutherford the Brave, and he was a total lighting designer’s kitty.  We went through a lot of rough and awesome times together. Somewhere I have video of Rutherford actually moving a fader up on a Hog 1000, but I can’t find it!

Thanks for being my pal, buddy boy. I miss you so much.

the cutest picture of Ruthman and his daddy

me and the ruthman:  an intimate portrait

rutherford sleeping

ruthman spills out of his bed

secret tool bag hiding spot with lazer eyes

lolmofo

sleepy little man

LDI 2010 – A Weekend That Kicked A Lot of Rear

I’m back from LDI 2010 in Las Vegas, Nevada.  I have to say that this year was one of my favorite LDI shows of perhaps my entire experience with going to LDI shows across the country.  Good people, good products, good experiences, and a lot of memorable moments.

This is kind of a teaser post -I wanted to say hi to the world, to tell you that I have eleventy katrillion pictures, videos, and other awesome LDI related stuffs to post this week for those of you who were out there rock-and-rolling and couldn’t make LDI.

I’ll elaborate more soon, but a short few of my highlights from this year’s show:

More to come, folks.  Get ready!

Happy Birthday, Edison’s Light Bulb!

Hey, is that a personified version of Thomas Edison’s commercialized incandescent lamp?  HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Edison’s commercialized tungsten incandescent lamp!

Technically, Edison’s patent was filed the following January 27 of 1880, but today in 1879 Edison got 13 hours and 32 minutes out of his lamp’s tests and experiments.  Regardless of Edison’s politics and behavior, you have to give it to him that he put the drive into inventing something that has revolutionized our lives.  One of my favorite quotes ever is Edison’s quote about his development of the incandescent lamp.  When a reporter asked Edison about the failures in experimentation in the process of inventing the lamp, he said “No!  I didn’t fail.  I found 1000 ways to not invent an incandescent light bulb.

It’s rumored that Edison’s incandescent lamp cost about $852,000 in today’s market to develop – about $40,000 in the late 1870’s.

I also found this great list of important relevant dates (years) in the timeline of the incandescent lamp!

1850:  Joseph W. Swan began working on a light bulb using carbonized paper filaments
1860:  Swan obtained a UK patent covering a partial vacuum, carbon filament incandescent lamp
1877:  Edward Weston forms Weston Dynamo Machine Company, in Newark, New Jersey.
1878:  Thomas Edison founded the Edison Electric Light Company
1878:  Hiram Maxim founded the United States Electric Lighting Company
1878:  205,144 William Sawyer and Albon Man 6/18 for Improvements in Electric Lamps
1878:  Swan receives a UK patent for an improved incandescent lamp in a vacuum tube
1879:  Swan began installing light bulbs in homes and landmarks in England.
1880:  223,898 Thomas Edison 1/27 for Electric Lamp and Manufacturing Process
1880:  230,309 Hiram Maxim 7/20 for Process of Manufacturing Carbon Conductors
1880:  230,310 Hiram Maxim 7/20 for Electrical Lamp
1880:  230,953 Hiram Maxim 7/20 for Electrical Lamp
1880:  233,445 Joseph Swan 10/19 for Electric Lamp
1880:  234,345 Joseph Swan 11/9 for Electric Lamp
1880:  Weston Dynamo Machine Company renamed Weston Electric Lighting Company
1880:  Elihu Thomson and Edwin Houston form American Electric Company
1880:  Charles F. Brush forms the Brush Electric Company
1881:  Joseph W. Swan founded the Swan Electric Light Company
1881:  237,198 Hiram Maxim 2/1 for Electrical Lamp assigned to U.S. Electric Lighting Company
1881:  238,868 Thomas Edison 3/15 for Manufacture of Carbons for Incandescent Lamps
1881:  247,097 Joseph Nichols and Lewis Latimer 9/13 for Electric Lamp
1881:  251, 540 Thomas Edison 12/27 for Bamboo Carbons Filament for Incandescent Lamps
1882:  252,386 Lewis Latimer 1/17 for Process of Manufacturing Carbons assigned to U.S. E. L. Co.
1882:  Edison’s UK operation merged with Swan to form the Edison & Swan United Co. or “Edi-swan”
1882:  Joesph Swan sold his United States patent rights to the Brush Electric Company
1883:  American Electric Company renamed Thomson-Houston Electric Company
1884:  Sawyer & Man Electric Co formed by Albon Man a year after William Edward Sawyer death
1886:  George Westinghouse formed the Westinghouse Electric Company
1886:  The National Carbon Co. was founded by the then Brush Electric Co. executive W. H. Lawrence
1888:  United States Electric Lighting Co. was purchased by Westinghouse Electric Company
1886:  Sawyer & Man Electric Co. was purchased by Thomson-Houston Electric Company
1889:  Brush Electric Company merged into the Thomson-Houston Electric Company
1889:  Edison Electric Light Company consolidated and renamed Edison General Electric Company.
1890:  Edison, Thomson-Houston, and Westinghouse, the “Big 3″ of the American lighting industry.
1892:  Edison Electric Light Co. and Thomson-Houston Electric Co. created General Electric Co.

Ah, the lamp.  HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Edison’s commercialized incandescent lamp!  Isn’t it funny that I’m flying out to Las Vegas for LDI today of all days?

Thanks Wired, Distributed Energy, Idea Finder, and Wikipedia!

GE Invents A CFL/Halogen Lamp?! Wait, What?

I just got a press release on a new upcoming lamp from GE.  This image was in the press release:

Everybody, I think we just saw the results of a drunken lamp party in which compact fluorescent lamps and halogen lamps learned how to be sentient and mate, producing the above (and below) results:

I am so confused and curious.  Let’s hope I see this at LDI.  Apparently the 15-20W CFL/Halogen hybrid lamp is supposed to replace the output from a 60W incandescent.  The halogen capsule inside?  It apparently only lights up until the CFL is at full output.  Oh, also – they claim a low percentage of Mercury (or HYDRARGYRUM, for those in the know).

The press release from GE – and since I don’t normally post press releases, you know that I find it interesting if it makes the site!

CLEVELAND, OH (October 20, 2010)—Consumers searching for the latest hybrid can soon look beyond their local car dealership. Starting in 2011, GE Lighting brings hybrid technology to the lighting aisle in the form of a unique, new incandescent-shaped light bulb that combines the instant brightness of halogen technology with the energy efficiency and longer rated life of compact fluorescent (CFL) technology.

The initial product launch will bring U.S. and Canadian consumers GE Reveal® and GE Energy Smart® Soft White varieties that offer significantly greater instant brightness than current covered CFLs, while preserving the energy efficiency and long life attributes that have elevated CFLs as a lighting staple in many households.

“When you look at our prototype incandescent-shaped bulb with that little halogen capsule nestled inside our smallest compact fluorescent tube, you’re seeing a byproduct of our intense customer focus and our innovation mindset,” says Kristin Gibbs, general manager of North American consumer marketing, GE Lighting. “We’ve constantly improved the initial brightness of our CFLs but customers haven’t been wholly satisfied. This is a giant leap forward.”

The halogen capsule inside GE’s new hybrid halogen-CFL bulb comes on instantly, allowing the bulb to operate noticeably brighter in less than a half a second. The capsule shuts off once the CFL comes to full brightness.

GE scientists engineered the bulb to operate with an exceptionally low level of mercury: 1 mg. Currently available CFLs range from 1.5 mg to 3.5 mg. The hybrid halogen-CFL bulbs will be RoHS compliant and offer eight times the life of incandescent bulbs (8,000 hours vs. 1,000 hours). Less frequent replacement due to longer light bulb life can reduce landfill waste.

First to launch will be 15-watt and 20-watt hybrid halogen-CFL bulbs that are considered viable replacements for 60-watt and 75-watt incandescent bulbs, respectively. Retail pricing and specific retail store availability will be announced in the coming months.